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The Architectural History Of Exeter Cathedral | by Philip Freeman, M.A.



The following pages are an expansion of two Lectures delivered at Exeter.

TitleThe Architectural History Of Exeter Cathedral
AuthorPhilip Freeman, M.A.
PublisherGeorge Bell & Sons.
Year1873
Copyright1873, George Bell & Sons.
AmazonThe Architectural History Of Exeter Cathedral

By Philip Freeman, M.A.,

Archdracon And Canon Of Exeter.

A New Edition,

From the Fine Arts Library

Fogg Art Museum Harvard University

Edited, With Additional Matter, By Edward Vere Freeman, M.A.,

Vicar of West Anstey.

Exeter: Henry S. Eland, High Street. London : George Bell & Sons.

Notice To Second Edition

In preparing a new edition of my father's Monograph, the portion relating to the early history of the Nave has been recast and somewhat extended, in order to incorporate the results of the discovery of Norman remains which have come to light since the issue of the original edition. With the exception of trifling corrections, the original text is in other respects unaltered.

A brief survey of the recent Restoration is added.

E. V. F.

Preface

The following pages are an expansion of two Lectures delivered at Exeter.

My best thanks are due, and are hereby offered, to Stuart A. Moore, Esq., for valuable assistance in deciphering the Fabric Rolls and other documents; and to the Rev. Mackenzie E. Walcott, author of "Sacred Archaeology," for placing at my disposal the rich stores of his ecclesiastical and antiquarian erudition.

Exeter,

August, 1873.

-The Architectural History Of The Cathedral Church Of Exeter
I propose, in the following pages, to speak of the Architectural History of Exeter Cathedral; noticing by the way some of the characteristic features, or peculiar merits, of the structure. What then,...
-Second Period - Norman And Transition Cathedral 1112 - 1200
But it is not until the days of the third Bishop, William Warelwast, a nephew of the Conqueror, that the ascertainable history of our present Cathedral begins. In the year 1112, says the Short Chroni...
-Second Period - Norman And Transition Cathedral 1112 - 1200. Part 2
At the same time, the interior is freed from one serious difficulty, that of providing support for a central tower; - a difficulty, which Winchester, and Wells, and Salisbury, though in different ways...
-Second Period - Norman And Transition Cathedral 1112 - 1200. Part 3
Outside the South wall of the Nave, several consecration crosses, agreeing in character with Marshall's time, (c. 1200) are carved at intervals. These harmonizing with the great South-eastern Transiti...
-Third Period - Early English Chapter House Choir Stalls 1200 - 1280
Taking leave now of our Norman-Transition Cathedral and its builders, we come upon a period of comparative repose. One noble accession was indeed made to the building at this time, viz., the Chapter H...
-Fourth Period - Decorated Cathedral 1280 - 1370
And now, with Quivirs accession, the 90 years' interregnum comes to an end. The Early English period, not unfruitful in accessories, but barren of operations on a large scale, closes; and the glorious...
-Fourth Period - Decorated Cathedral 1280 - 1370. Part 2
An interesting parallel to the transformation of our Lady Chapel, by Quivil and Bitton, is furnished by that of the Chapel attached to the palace at Wells. The original builder of that Chapel, as of t...
-Fourth Period - Decorated Cathedral 1280 - 1370. Part 3
We thus establish, as I conceive, with absolute certainty, the date of the completion of the eastern half of the choir - the sanctuary or presbytery; a point entirely misconceived hitherto. To Bit...
-Fourth Period - Decorated Cathedral 1280 - 1370. Part 4
And it cannot be too strongly insisted upon, that our supreme, and often our sole authority, in these matters, is the contemporary evidence of the Fabric Rolls, Registers, or other original documents....
-Fourth Period - Decorated Cathedral 1280 - 1370. Part 5
The interest of these details, for our present purpose, lies in the confirmation afforded by them of the choir having been treated in two portions. It is at the same time always interesting to trace t...
-Fourth Period - Decorated Cathedral 1280 - 1370. Part 6
These details, - which to some readers may seem to require an apology, - are not without their ecclesio-logical interest, as adding to our exact information about the proceedings of Church builders fi...
-Fourth Period - Decorated Cathedral 1280 - 1370. Part 7
The transformation of the Choir, with its transeptal chapels, into the Decorated style, was now complete. I have throughout spoken of the work as a transformation, and not a re-building in the strict ...
-Fourth Period - Decorated Cathedral 1280 - 1370. Part 8
Another curious phenomenon in our Cathedral can only be accounted for, I believe, on the transformation hypothesis. I mean the tiny pair of arches (they cannot otherwise be characterized), forming a v...
-Fourth Period - Decorated Cathedral 1280 - 1370. Part 9
Our stalls of the thirteenth century were no doubt devoid of canopies, as these seem not to have come in so early. But the presumption is that canopies were now provided by Stapledon. For it is very d...
-Fourth Period - Decorated Cathedral 1280 - 1370. Part 10
Now, too, we obtain light upon some of our Fabric Roll entries. It seems to be absolutely certain that there were two structures in the Cathedral, both of which were called the Bishop's Seat: one of...
-Fourth Period - Decorated Cathedral 1280 - 1370. Part 11
It should not be omitted here, that the triforium arcading (also the work of Stapledon) immediately above the sedilia, contains a manifest repetition, in form of hood-terminations, of the royal and ep...
-Fourth Period - Decorated Cathedral 1280 - 1370. Part 12
As to the purpose of this screen, it should be explained that it was not, as is commonly supposed, a rood-screen at all - that is, it did not carry the rood. That was placed - viz., a crucifix, of l...
-Fourth Period - Decorated Cathedral 1280 - 1370. Part 13
Two features in this great enterprise of glazing call for especial notice. The windows of the Lady Chapel had been left by Quivil, as far as we are informed, plain. And it required a special effort to...
-Fourth Period - Decorated Cathedral 1280 - 1370. Part 14
On the other hand there are one or two splendid exceptions, and those, too, covering a great deal of ground, to this lack of documentary evidence: and to those I proceed to direct the reader's attenti...
-Fourth Period - Decorated Cathedral 1280 - 1370. Part 15
This very interesting and useful document is not, as Dr. Oliver represents (p. 383), an agreement or contract to furnish marble, but a reckoning concerning marble already contracted for, and in part f...
-Fourth Period - Decorated Cathedral 1280 - 1370. Part 16
Such is the curious confirmation which this document, joined to architectural considerations, supplies of the views advocated in this volume as to our Cathedral's history. It will also be perceived th...
-Fourth Period - Decorated Cathedral 1280 - 1370. Part 17
The bearing of this erection of the gallery (supposing it correctly dated,) upon the date of the Nave at large, is this, that it was evidently an afterthought. In Canon's agreement the whole of the tr...
-Fourth Period - Decorated Cathedral 1280 - 1370. Part 18
And the next year, 1350-51, may well have witnessed the actual dedication of the New Work. The entries towards the close of 1350 indicate all sorts of busy preparation, as if for such an event. Joh...
-Fifth Period - Perpendicular Western Screens, Etc. 1370 - 1520
The first of any importance, in this period, was the completion of the Cloisters, hitherto extending round but two or three sides. They were finished and glazed in 1380-81, and paved with marble in 13...
-Restoration
It will have been apparent to the reader of the foregoing pages that the account they give of the Cathedral was in some measure derived from a study of the building during its restoration. But for thi...
-Restoration. Part 2
Such then was our Cathedral, - robbed of early splendours, extensively crumbled by decay, unworthily furnished, bare with monotony of yellow-wash - when its restoration was entered upon, under the gui...
-Restoration. Part 3
A kindred work to the restoration of the Sedilia is that of the Episcopal Throne. Buried in brown paint and varnish and in other respects impaired, this magnificent structure had long concealed the fu...
-Restoration. Part 4
Among the various fittings provided for services in the Nave only the Pulpit calls for special remark. This Martyrs' Memorial, for such it is, though essentially modern in touch, will rank for beauty ...
-Illustrations
It only remains to give a brief account of certain illustrations accompanying this volume. One of these is a photograph of the Foundation Charter of Exeter Cathedral, placed by Edward the Confessor, ...
-Illustrations. Continued
The day on which these memorable things were done is not named; but it is a permissible conjecture that it was on the Feast of St. Peter in cathedra. This derives some countenance from the fact that...
-Cathedral Church Of Exeter - Notes
1 There was a Monastery here in the 7th century, since Bp. Boniface of Crediton, who was martyred in 755, ast. 75, received his early education in it under Wolfhard, the Abbot, In Exanchester, quod m...
-Cathedral Church Of Exeter - Notes. Part 2
17 Oliver, p. 51. 18 Our authorities as to the exact nature of Quivil's work about the Transepts, are, I apprehend, solely and exclusively, the Fabric Rolls. It was from these, no doubt, that Hoker a...
-Cathedral Church Of Exeter - Notes. Part 3
30 Fabric Roll 1301-2 In 1271 pedibus vitri ad sum-mas fenestras frontis novi operis, cum duabus formis in utraque parte, œ29 2s. 5 1/2d. For 1271 feet of glass for the upper windows of the fron...
-Cathedral Church Of Exeter - Notes. Part 4
34 Fabric Roll 1303-4 In 18 magnis petris ap. Portland ad clave, (i.e. claves, keys, or keying stones for each compartment of the vaulting, carved into bosses on the under surface), empt. una c...
-Cathedral Church Of Exeter - Notes. Part 5
52 Fabric Boll 1418 Pro scriptura lapidis Dominis Leofrici, primi ecclesia Exoniensis Episcopi. 53 By Robert Garland, Architect {Winkle's Cathedrals, 1838.) 54 Fabric Boll 1316-17 In 38 col. m...
-Cathedral Church Of Exeter - Notes. Part 6
2. The Great Transept Windows - Ibid Item vitreario pro 240 ped. vitri de proprio vitro faciendo 52s. 64, videlicit pro quolibet pede de albo..... In illis 240 ped., 66 ped. colons. Memorandum quod...
-Cathedral Church Of Exeter - Notes. Part 7
5. The Windows In The Eastern Bay Of Nave - Fabric Boll 1318-19 Et in duab. magn. form, in navi eccles. que continent 440 ped. unde de colore 112 ped. œ4 6s. 3d., pro pede ut supra. And for two l...
-Cathedral Church Of Exeter - Notes. Part 8
75 Au Bailiff Et Provost De Chuddelegh Saluz Parceo que le Dean et Chapitre d'Excestre nous sunt ore tard (i.e. ad horam tardam? lately; v. Brachet, Dictionnaire Etym in v. Desormais) requis, que nou...
-Cathedral Church Of Exeter - Notes. Part 9
One of these is a grant of a manor in Doflisc (i.e., Dawlish) from Edward to Leofric, then his chaplain only, in 1044 (six years before); it is signed Eadsinus Xti eccl. Archi prsesul. (This has bee...









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