It is perhaps simpler to make the entrance the chief factor in the first planning, since it is such an important factor in all house plans. Quite unconsciously our impression of the house is greatly influenced by our ideas about the front entrance. There are entrances that repel, that invite, that show the owner's love of display, that leave the visitor in doubt because there are apparently three front doors.

A SIMPLE COLONIAL ENTRANCE.

A SIMPLE COLONIAL ENTRANCE.

OLD COLONIAL ENTRANCE. NORWALL, MASS. Leaded Glass Top and Side Lights.

OLD COLONIAL ENTRANCE. NORWALL, MASS. Leaded Glass Top and Side Lights.

Plan of a House Showing the Use of Cross Section Paper.

Plan of a House Showing the Use of Cross-Section Paper. Each Small Square Equals One Foot.

Essentials

What then are the essentials in a front entrance? First, it should be so placed as to leave no doubt that it is the principal entrance. To that end it should be easily accessible and have some distinctive character. It is a source of considerable profit and diversion to study the front entrances of the dwellings on a particular street to see the character or lack of it which they convey to the passer-by.

Let us consider the different types of entrances. The first, simplest, and least desirable is that in which the caller steps directly from a stone or a plank into one of the principal rooms of the house.

Simplest Entrance

There are many disadvantages about such an arrangement. Whatever of cold or heat or storm is on the outside is taken directly within to the living room. In winter the frequent admission of these blasts of cold air increases the expense of heating the house. It also means additional labor for the housekeeper because of the snow and dirt that are brought into the living room. The addition of even a small porch on the outside large enough to hold a mat on which the muddy boots can be wiped, and a roof over the door will add not only to the appearance of the house, but afford much protection to the front door.

Porch And Reception Hall Entrance

Another form of entrance consists of porch and reception hall with the stairs leading from it. This form is sometimes used to economize space; that is, to make the hall serve the purpose of a reception room.

PLAN No. 1, Shows Reception Room so Arranged as to Avoid Drafts and to Give Space for Chairs.

PLAN No. 1, Shows Reception Room so Arranged as to Avoid Drafts and to Give Space for Chairs. Combination Stairs.

Scale 1/16 inch=l foot.*

A fireplace adds to the comfort and attractiveness of this hall. Care must be exercised as to the relative position of the doors, fireplace and stairway or the room may be a drafty place. With the proper precautions it can be a useful and attractive room. This plan is improved by making a vestibule of part of the hall. (See Plan No. 1).

In this plan the danger of drafts is lessened by the fact that so large a part of the reception room is beyond the opening into the hall and also removed from the staircase.

* In all of the house plans shown one-sixteenth of an inch in the drawing represents one foot in the house.

PLAN No. 2. One Type of Central Hall. Large Porch on the East. House Faces South.

PLAN No. 2. One Type of Central Hall. Large Porch on the East. House Faces South. Notice Position of Ice Box.

An Attractive Upstairs Hall. Scale 1/16 inch = 1 foot.

PHOTOGRAPH OF THE HOUSE GIVEN AS PLAN No. 2. View from the Southeast, showing Front and Side Porches.

PHOTOGRAPH OF THE HOUSE GIVEN AS PLAN No. 2. View from the Southeast, showing Front and Side Porches.

ANOTHER VIEW OF THE EXTERIOR OF HOUSE NO. 2.

ANOTHER VIEW OF THE EXTERIOR OF HOUSE NO. 2.

PLAN No. 3. Shielded Entrance at North Side. House Facing West.

PLAN No. 3. Shielded Entrance at North Side. House Facing West.