Kitchen Floor

No entirely satisfactory finish for the kitchen floor has yet been found. The time honored way of scrubbing with soap and water makes the whitest and cleanest looking floor, it is true - but the work required! It does not seem to be an economic condition to have the floor of the work shop such that nothing may fall upon it. Linseed oil, frequently applied, makes a finish in every way good if it were not for the unsightly darkening.. When the wood is thoroughly filled with oil, nothing will produce a spot on such a floor, not even grease. It may be wiped up with a wet cloth but should not be scrubbed with soap and water.

Linoleum

A good grade of linoleum makes a floor covering most easily cared for. When this is to be used there is no necessity of laying an expensive hard wood floor in the kitchen. This does not mean, however, that the floor need not be carefully laid, for if any of the boards warp the linoleum will be quickly worn through in the raised parts.

Oiling

The clear boiled linseed oil is applied hot. The first essential in the care of any finished floor is that it should be perfectly clean and dry before oil, wax or varnish is applied.

The floors of pantries, back hall and stairs may well be finished in oil.

Expense Of Finished Floors

The expense so often urged against a hard wood floor does not seem to be borne out by the following statistics - carpets to look well must be frequently removed while waxed or oiled floors may be kept in order for years with slight additional expense.

The utmost care should be used in securing well dried material for floors, and eternal vigilance is required to prevent new floors from being ruined by careless workmen before the house is finished.

Comparative Cost Of Floors

The following table compiled from, recent estimates will answer some of the questions concerning the cost of new floors per square foot.

I. Cost Of Soft Pine Floor

Laid unfinished ................5 cents.

Stained ...................... .

Total cost of floor............5 cents.

2. Cost Of Soft Pine Floor

Laid unfinished ................5 cents.

Painted two coats, cracks not puttied..........................2 ".

Total cost of floor.............7 cents.

Painted.

3. Cost Of Hard Pine Floor

Planed and scraped..............7 cents.

Oiled with one coat of hot linseed oil ..........................2.

Total cost of floor.............9 cents.

Oil.

4. Cost Of Hard Pine Floor

Planed and scraped..............7 cents.

Stained and two coats of shellac.5.

Total cost of floor...........12 cents.

Shellac.

5. Cost Of Soft Pine Floor

Laid unfinished ............... 5 cents.

Cost of ingrain carpet at 90c per yard .......................10 ".

Total cost of floor...........15 cents.

Carpet.

6. Cost Of Soft Pine Floor

Laid unfinished ............... 5 cents.

Cost of plain linoleum at $2.50 per yard, 6 ft. wide..............14 ".

Total cost of floor...........19 cents.

Plain Linoleum.

7. Cost Of Straight Oak Floor

Planed and scraped..............9 cents.

Stained, filled and two coats of shellac ......................5 ".

Total cost of floor............ 14 cents.

Oak.

8. Cost Of Straight Oak Floor

Planed and scraped.............9 cents.

Stained, one coat of shellac and wax........................5 ".

Total cost of floor............14 cents.

Oak and Wax.

9. Cost Of Soft Pine Floor

Laid unfinished ............... 5 cents.

Cost of Brussels carpets at $1.25 per yard ...................15.

Total cost of floor............20 cents.

Brussels Carpet.

10. Cost Of Soft Pine Floor

Laid unfinished ............... 5 cents.

Cost of inlaid linoleum at $3.00 per yard (6 ft. wide).........16.6 ".

Total cost of floor............21.6 cents.

Inlaid Linoleum.

11. Cost Of Quarter Sawed Oak Floor

Planed and scraped.............14 cents.

Stained, filled and three coats of varnish ..................... 6.

Total cost of floor............20 cents.

Quartered Oak.

At present writing, 1919. prices are so very high and unstable that it is hardly worth while to correct these pre-war figures given, but they serve to give some idea of relative costs. The only way to get more accurate figures is to consult with a local carpenter or contractor.