Thoroughfares

The thoroughfares, too, may be classified as those intended for the family or for the servants and the family ones may be intended for public or private use; the servants' thoroughfares may be private or service, that is, used by servants in performance of their duties.

- We give, then, as most suggestive and helpful the "analysis of the house plan" outlined by Osborne in his little book on house planning;

Public.

Reception Room (Pu.).

Parlor (Pu , Pi ).

Drawing Room (Pu., Pi.).

Library (Pu , Pi ).

Family.

Billiard Room (Pi.).

Picture Gallery (Pu).

Dining Room (Pi., S.).

Verandas.

Rooms

Etc.

Private.

Study (Pi).

Boudoir (Pi.).

Bed Rooms (pi.).

Dressing Rooms (Pi., S.).

Bath Rooms (Pi.).

The House

Verandas.

Etc.

Service.

Kitchen (S., Sp.).

Pantries (S).

Servants

Laundries (S.).

Dairies (S)

Store Rooms (S.).

Etc.

Private.

Servants' Hall (S., Sp)

" Bed Rooms (Sp).

" Bath " (Sp.).

" Verandas.

Public.

Principal Porches.

Family.

Vestibule.

Entrance Hall.

Inner Hall.

Thorough-

FARES

Etc.

Private.

Family Stair Hall.

Family Corridors.

Etc.

Servants.

Service.

Between Family and Ser vice Rooms.

Private.

Bet. Servants' Rooms, or Servants' and Service Rooms.

Note. - Letters in brackets indicate, the proper thoroughfares upon which the room should be found; where two thoroughfares are indicated the room may or should be upon both; Pu, public family; Pi., private family; S., service; Sp., servants' private thoroughfares.

It is to be hoped that the statement about the difficulties of house-planning will not discourage anyone from undertaking it. Women especially should learn to express on paper the mental picture they have of the house that seems to them comfortable and convenient. At the same time they learn to understand and to think in the terms of the architect and so to interpret his plans. Very many disappointments about the "new house" are due to the fact that the housekeeper "did not understand from the plan that it was going to be that way." Some bedrooms are made with no desirable place in them for the bed because they were considered as rooms in the abstract without thinking of their particular use and the furniture which would be re-ouired.

Use Of Cross-Section Paper

House-planning if entered into in the right spirit, can furnish to the family quite as much interest and more profit than a game of cards. A good pencil, a ruler, an eraser, some cross-section paper and a problem are all that one needs to begin the game. The spaces in the paper, usually one-eighth inch, can stand for' a foot and thus aid to accuracy and proportion of the several parts. Or the engineering paper in which the spaces are smaller may be used.