Sliding Doors

Perhaps in this connection a mild protest may be entered against a too generous use of sliding doors between the parlor, library, living room and dining room. They may prove useful when one wishes to "open up" the house for a large company, but for daily living they certainly detract from the privacy and singleness of use for which the separate rooms were planned. In feudal times the hall was the place where the people lived, ate, worked, and slept. The introduction of separate rooms for sleeping and eating were regarded as improvements. The introduction of a distinct passage way was a still further improvement. A too generous use of sliding doors seems to convert the floor space into a large hall. Sounds and odors then penetrate to all parts of the house. The reader in the library is apt to be disturbed by the chatting in the parlor. The odors from the dining room are wafted into the living room. It seems much more desirable to have a hall serve as a means of communication and the rooms allowed to fulfill their particular function.

Sitting Room Or Study. The Library

This term may mean a study chiefly for some one member of the family or it may be a kind of sitting room in which most of the books of the family are kept. If it is the former, the privacy and quiet which the worker seeks is often more easily obtained on the second floor.

The Kitchen

There yet remains for consideration that all important room, the kitchen; out of which issues so much that makes or mars the health and comfort of the family. A visit to the kitchen of the Deanery of Durham Cathedral helped the author to realise as never before how the purposes of the kitchen had changed in the centuries. That was an octagonal room with eight fireplaces and a stone floor. The guides explained that perhaps only two or three of the fireplaces would be used in the preparation of the daily food; that in the others were hung the quarters of beef or the pork destined for future use and preserved by the smoke which was kept beneath them.

Use Of The Kitchen

The modern kitchen is not supposed to be either a store room, a laundry, or a sitting room, but it is a place for the preparation of food, a workshop. For that purpose it should be well lighted, ventilated preferably by a cross draft, and of such materials as can be cleaned easily. It should be so planned that its chief articles of furniture - the range, sink, work table - should be near together and in line with the pantry, that its working space may be as compact as possible. (See Kitchen in Plan No. 7).

AN ATTRACTIVE SMALL HOUSE.

AN ATTRACTIVE SMALL HOUSE.

In One of the Newer Styles, Wide Eaves and Torches. Generous Fireplace Forms Screen Between Dining and Living Room. Walter Burley Griffin, Architect, Chicago.

Use Of The Kitchen 77CONVENIENT PLAN OP KITCHEN, DINING ROOM AND PANTRIES.

CONVENIENT PLAN OP KITCHEN, DINING ROOM AND PANTRIES.