Size

A room ten by twelve feet is usually sufficient for the purpose. Opinions differ greatly concerning the details of the kitchen. Some women prefer a very small kitchen and a large pantry with provision for doing the pastry work and much of the preparation of the food other than the cooking. Others prefer a large kitchen with a space quite removed from the range for this preparation. If the woman does her own work the first plan has much to commend it, and the amount of travel is not greatly increased if the working pantry be well placed.

Closets

However much opinions differ as to the size of the kitchen, all women appreciate the value of closets and cupboards. It may be desirable for the cook in hotel kitchens to have his utensils hung on the walls over his work table. His interest does not lie in making as little work at possible for those who are to wash the soiled utensils and keep the room in good order. He wishes everything at hand that he may work quickly. In the average home the woman who cooks also cleans and it is to her interest to have as few things as possible exposed to the dust and steam of the kitchen. Utensils do not need to be exposed to be easily accessible and the care of them is greatly lessened if cupboards are abundant and roomy.

The Ice Box

The location of the ice-box is a fruitful source of annoyance in many houses. It should be so placed that it can be filled from the back porch and thus avoid the necessity of having the iceman's boots and dripping ice leave their marks in the kitchen.

See ice-box in Plan No. 2.

KITCHEN PLAN WITH LARGE PANTRIES.

KITCHEN PLAN WITH LARGE PANTRIES.

Sink in Butler's Pantry. Refrigerator in Working Pantry. Servants' Room.

Closets

Before leaving the first floor I wish to emphasize the comfort and convenience afforded by plenty of closets in addition of those destined for kitchen uses. Beginning in the front entrance a useful piece of furniture is a box seat which may hold the rubbers. A closet under the front stairs for wraps is most desirable. Reference has already been made to their use in the living room.

We have come by a somewhat circuitous route to the second floor plan. Just at this point is where the real fun in house planning begins, when one begins to devise a means of getting to the second floor. It is said that most women plan houses without putting in any stairs, and then wonder what the architect means by the "well hole," since they understood that the "water supply was to be brought from the outside".