Conditions On The Farm

The usual distribution of the first floor space into kitchen, dining room, living room, and parlor or reception room with hall and vestibule which has been suggested in these plans has been worked out in many attractive ways for the city or village house, but is not so well developed for the average farm house. The necessities for farm dwellings differ somewhat from town houses. For example, there is little formal calling on the farm, but frequent short calls that have more or less of a business character. It is not desirable to bring these strangers into the privacy of the family life and apparently not suitable to receive them in a formal reception room. It seems as if a reception hah with desk, fireplace and one or two easy chairs, with the daily paper or new magazine might serve a useful purpose here.

Men's Sitting Room

Another room that is much needed in some farm houses is a sitting room for the men who work for the family. It should be on the first floor, easily accessible from the side or rear of the house, and have in it or near it a lavatory in order that the workers may be able to make themselves clean and comfortable before they pass to the dining room.

Large Dining Room

Another requirement of the average farm house is a large dining room to accommodate the large number of men that are needed on threshing and wood sawing days. It is quite desirable also that the dining room shall have an outside door, that it may not be necessary for workmen to pass through the kitchen and pantries or sitting room to reach the dining room.

Plan No. 7, shows a plan for a farm house that has many desirable qualities. The men's sitting room is well placed. The bedrooms for the "help" are separated from the family bedrooms as is also the bathroom. A bedroom downstairs is often a great convenience, particularly if the mother does her own work and has little children. A great lack in most farm houses is water brought into the kitchen. It seems to be easy enough to have the wind pump and the pipes to carry the water into the barn, but "so much trouble" to put it into the kitchen. In no place is the need greater for water in the kitchen and for a good bath room than on the farm.

The plan for a farm house is capable of many variations. The outline of the parlor may be made less rectangular by a change in the windows. If the men's room is not needed by the "help" as a sitting room all the year it will make a good children's room.

PL.AN No. 7. Farm House. Facing South. Family Bedroom and Help Sitting Room.

PL.AN No. 7. Farm House. Facing South. Family Bedroom and "Help" Sitting Room.

PLAN No. 7. Farm House. Separation of Family and Servants Rooms.

PLAN No. 7. Farm House. Separation of Family and Servants Rooms. Good Arrangement of Rear Stairs.

Farmer's Plan For A Farm House

Most farmers would probably not be willing to put in two bathrooms. In that case the space given to the family bathroom might be used as a sewing room. The arrangement of the back stairs makes it possible to pass directly to the attic from the first floor.

PLAN No. 8. Basement Plan of a Farm House Raving Bath Room in the Cellar.

PLAN No. 8. Basement Plan of a Farm House Raving Bath Room in the Cellar.

The dining room is large and can be entered from the men's room. The essentials in the kitchen an well located.

PLAN No. 8. First Floor. Bay Window in the Dining Room, and Fireplace in Living Room.

PLAN No. 8. First Floor. Bay Window in the Dining Room, and Fireplace in Living Room. (See Page 59 for Second Floor Plan).

Plan No. 8 is a student's plan for a farm house. It shows the use of cross-section paper in making house plans, each small square representing a foot. The maker of this plan is a farmer's son. It seemed to him desirable to have the place for the men to clean up in the basement. The cold storage room has in it a place for the storage of ice for summer use. The stairs from the basement lead directly into the rear hall, which gives easy access to kitchen and dining room. A bay window adds attractiveness to the dining room and a fire-place gives cheer in the living room. If it were desirable the library might serve as the office and reception room, or the room could be used as a downstairs bedroom if one were needed.

If the house be heated by a furnace, a hall is very desirable; if it be not so heated a hall seems a cold, unattractive place in winter.

These two types of house plans seem fairly well suited to the needs of farm life.