General Introduction,............F. W. ANDREWES, M.D, F.RCP, D.P.H.

Section L Plan.........................Prop. ROBERT KERR, F.R.I.B.A.

„ II. Construction,..................G. LISTER SUTCLIFFE, A.RI.B.A., M.San.1.

„ III. Water-Supply,..................HENRY LAW, M-Inst.CE, F.San.L

„ TV. Domestic WATER-Supply...........HENRY CLAY.

V. Household Filters,............ H. JOSSE JOHNSON, M.R, D.P.H

„ VI. Sanitary Plumbing,..............HENRY CLAY.

VII. 8abitabt Fittings,........ KEITH D. YOUNG, F.R.LRA.

„ VIII. Drainage,.....................WILLIAM SPINKS, A M.InstC.E

IX. Sewage-Disposal,................H. PERCY BOULNOIS, M.InstC.E., F.San.1.

„ X. Warming.....................E. R DOLBY, A.M.InstC.R, M.I.M.E.

„ XI. Warming and Cooking by Electricity,.E. A. CLAREMONT, M.I.E.E, M.I.M.E.

XII. Ventilation,..................WILLIAM HENMAN, F.R.I.BA.

„ XIII Lighting, 1. Candles, Oil, and Electricity, E. A. CLAREMONT, M.I.E.E., M.I.M.E.

2. Gas,......................HENRY CLAY.

„ XIV. Gas-producing Apparatus,.........J. MURRAY SOMERVILLE

„ XV. Furniture and Decoration.........E. F. WILLOUGHBY, M.D. D.P.H.

„ XVI. Sanitart Inspection or Houses,.....WILLIAM H. WELLS.

„ XVII. Imirovement of Existing Houses...G. LISTER SUTCLIFFE, A.R.I.B.A., M.San.1

. XVIII. Climate and Situation,.......... E. F WII.I.OUGHBY, M.D., D.P.H.

„ XIX. Stables,......................F. W. LOCKWOOD, F.I.S.E.

„ XX. Sanitary Law..................A. WYNTER BLYTH, M.RC.S, F.I.C

During the past fifty years much has been accomplished in the field of sanitary reform, but much still remains to be done. We have gained accurate knowledge, based on exact observation and statistical research, of the nature of many diseases and the modes in which they are spread; and, speaking broadly, it may be said that the sanitary advances of the Victorian age have consisted in the removal of the predisposing conditions of disease. Even now, however, it cannot be said that the general principles of sanitary house-const are adequate adequately understood by householders, or even by those actually engaged in the design and construction of dwellings. It is hoped that this book on the "Principles and Practice of Modern House-Construction " will be of service in furthering the great work of sanitary improvement.

To Councillors, and Members of Sanitary Authorities, the l.ook cannot fail to be of service, upholding as it does a high standard of building and sanitary work, which, if maintained in practice, will inevitably result in the reduction of disease and death. Of all men in the community, those who are set in authority ought to have clear and correct ideas on this important subject of house construction.

The illustrations form a most important feature of the work, being upwards of 700 in number, and covering practically the whole range of house-construction from foundation to roof, from sanitary fittings and water-supply to sewage-disposal, and including numerous illustrations relating to lighting, warming, ventilation, etc Wherever necessary, separately printed plates have been introduced to illustrate important details, several being printed in colours, and some being of larger size and made to fold, numbering in all about twenty-four.

A very full Index will render the whole information contained in the book easy of reference.

Conditions of Publication. The work will be printed on fine paper, demy ito size, and will be issued in 6 divisions, strongly bound in cloth, at as. each. No order will be accepted except for the entire work.

Plate II.

List Of Sections And Authors 1001SECTION THROUGH SUBURBAN HOUSE.

Section Through Suburban House.

A. Concrete ground-layer, 6" thick.

B. Aaphalt damp-course extending over walls, ground layer, and area.

C. Concrete floors.

D. Fawoetts fire-proof flooring, consisting of tubular earthen ware lintel*, steel joists, and concrete. E. Terrasso floor surfaces.

Wood-block flooring. G. Parquet flooring. H. Tiled flooring. I Tiled dado.

J. Glased brickwork.

K. Curve formed in terrazzo or cement.

1. Cement skirting,

M. State window ledges.

N. Asphalt Asphalt under parapet and gutter.

(). Glazed roof (the roof of balcony also to be glased above all windows). P. Lead flat. Q. Roof formed with boards, felt or Willenden paper, raking and horizontal laths, and Westmoreland

Mates. R. Laths and plaster.

S. Concrete-slab partitions,

T. Sinka U. Slop-sink with cistern over. V. Waste-pipe from slop-sink and ventilating-pipe for back drains. W. Ventilating -pipe for front-drains. X. Rain water pipe. I L-shaped steel lintels. Z. party wall carried above roof. A 1. Door fanlights made to open. B 1. Manhole for access to loft.