books



previous page: The Better Homes Manual | by Blanche Halbert
  
page up: Architecture and Construction Books
  
next page: An Architectural And Historical Account Of Crosby Place, London | by Edward L. Blackburn

Inside The House That Jack Built | by George Leland Hunter



The story, told in conversation, of how two homes were furnished

TitleInside The House That Jack Built
AuthorGeorge Leland Hunter
PublisherJohn Lane Company
Year1914
Copyright1914, John Lane Company
AmazonThe Well-Built House

By George Leland Hunter, Author Of "Home Furnishing", "Tapestries: Their Origin. History And Renaissance":

With Thirty-Six Illustrations From Photographs

Inside The House That Jack Built 2

To My Beloved Wife, Esther The Original Of Mary

-Preface
I WISH here to express my thanks not only to the owners, but also to Messrs. Francis H. Kimball and F. Y. Joannes, the architects of the House that Jack Built, and to Messrs. Hiss and Weeks, the archi...
-Chapter I. The House
THE house that Jack built has a wonderful situation and a wonderful view. It sits high on the top of a forested hill, with a clear horizon to the north, northeast and west. In the valley down below ca...
-Chapter II. The Living-Room
I'M sorry the draperies aren't up, said Mary as we were making ready to photograph the living-room of the house that Jack built. They are really very attractive, in old-gold velours, with a classic...
-The Living-Room. Continued
How did you learn all that? broke in Mary. I never see anything like that in books and magazine articles on decoration. Probably not, I assented. I have several times in magazine articles to...
-Chapter III. The Dining-Room
EARLY in June, Jack and Mary were on their way home from Cousin Tom's. The day was fine and the sun hastening down the western horizon. The car was running smoothly and silently, and they were in high...
-The Dining-Room. Continued
That for you, said Mary, slapping his cheek, but gently, and then taking hold of his hand under the carriage robe, you never forget any joke on me. I notice you never say anything about the time yo...
-Chapter IV. The Owner's Bedroom
YOU look tired, Mary, said Jack, tenderly, as they entered their apartment on Central Park South, which they were soon to give up for a house of their own - the House that Jack built. I'm afraid we...
-The Owner's Bedroom. Continued
I wish I could get maids like that, said Harriet, after they had adjoined to the dining-room. Why, she did this beautifully and in no time at all. Do you remember her six months ago? asked Ma...
-Chapter V. Uncle Henry's Drawing-Room
WHY, they've got the carpets on the wall, said Mary the moment they were seated. They, meaning Jack and Mary and Tom and Harriet, had just returned from an afternoon reception at Uncle Henry's house...
-Uncle Henry's Drawing-Room. Continued
It undoubtedly is, agreed Harriet, with some reluctance. She looks better there than in any other room in the house. Her lines, commented Jack, are like those of the Hepplewhite furniture, s...
-Chapter VI. The Hall
THE hall in Jack's house, though small - only as long as the living-room is wide (17 feet), and only 5 feet wide outside of the stairway - is splendidly lighted from half-glass doors at each end and f...
-The Hall. Continued
That's an Afghan of inferior quality. It wouldn't do for you at all. It's the blackest thing I ever saw, said Mary. I didn't know any Orientals were ever so dark. Few of them are, remark...
-Chapter VII. At Cousin Kate's
AT last Jack and Mary reached Breezy Meadows. They had heard enthusiastic accounts of Cousin Kate's success in adopting an abandoned farm and making an old farmhouse habitable, and they expected to ...
-At Cousin Kate's. Continued
Yes, agreed Jack, she is one of the most different persons I have ever met, and makes even a commonplace story throb with excitement. The house shows it, continued Mary. Just think of paying...
-Chapter VIII. The Den
WHY do you call it the den? asked Harriet, referring to the upstairs room where Jack and Mary have their writing-desks. Tom and Harriet were dining with Jack and Mary in the house that Jack built...
-The Den. Continued
Mary, you know I love a swivel chair, said Jack. Yes, assented Mary, but the reason you bought that desk and chair was because you can turn them over to your office in town later and save just...
-Chapter IX. The Sun-Room
MARY and Harriet were in Harriet's living-room, busy with a portfolio of rare colored fashion plates of a century ago, which Uncle Henry had sent to Harriet as a birthday present. Jack and Tom sat in ...
-The Sun-Room. Continued
Such a magnificent moon, said Mary, looking out seaward, and redder than I have ever seen it before. Your sunrises must be as thrilling as our sunsets over the Hudson. Harriet laughed; so did T...
-Chapter X. The Guest-Room
HOW do you like it? asked Mary, as they sat down in the furniture department at McHarg's. Like what? responded Harriet, whose mind was still on the gown that the modiste had failed to fit to he...
-The Guest-Room. Continued
Mary interrupted. For my guest-room I want white enameled furniture, with cretonne draperies and upholstery; but I simply cannot pay any such prices. The salesman smiled. Mary grew indignant. Ha...
-Chapter XI. The Bathroom
JACK, it is perfectly lovely, said Mary inspecting for the first time the owner's bathroom in the house that Jack built. It was with fear and trembling that Jack had ventured to take entire charge o...
-The Bathroom. Continued
One hundred and seventy-six dollars, responded Jack. Oh, Jack, said Mary, that is a terrible price. I saw one six feet long for $40 yesterday in a shop on Sixth Avenue. There are bath tub...
-Chapter XII. The Kitchen
AFTER all, said Jack, as they rose from the luncheon table, the kitchen is the most vital part. Unless it is well equipped and efficiently manned - or rather womanned as is customary in the home of...
-The Kitchen. Part 2
Here comes Delia, now, said Mary, as the kitchen door opened. Delia, Mr. Jack was just telling how I cured you of indigestion. Indade you did, mom, said Delia. If it hadn't been for you, I'd...
-The Kitchen. Part 3
That doesn't appear to be the attitude of all the gas companies, said Tom. The exhibit at Madison Avenue and Forty-second Street is a wonderful demonstration of what gas can do. Almost too per...
-Chapter XIII. The Servants' Rooms
AT last our dining-room furniture is here, said Mary, as she and Jack welcomed Cousin Tom and Harriet. I can hardly wait for you to see it. It was all carved by hand and made to order. Presentl...
-The Servants' Rooms. Continued
How many servants has he? asked Harriet. Fifteen maids, each with her own outside room, simply but well furnished, all on the third floor, and ten men with rooms on the ground floor that would b...
-Prices Of Some Of The Furnishings
The following prices are the average quoted by three New York dealers, some of which are more and some less than Jack and Tom actually did pay. It must be remembered that the same model made to order ...









TOP
previous page: The Better Homes Manual | by Blanche Halbert
  
page up: Architecture and Construction Books
  
next page: An Architectural And Historical Account Of Crosby Place, London | by Edward L. Blackburn