Table linen and other large flat pieces are ironed in one piece on a large machine. This consists of a concave bed of highly polished iron (see Fig. 154) heated by steam or gas and air. In this bed revolves a heated roller, clothed in flannel and calico sheeting. The article to be ironed is placed in the feeding bar, whilst the fixed bar is so placed that it is impossible for the finger of the attendant to become jammed by the roller. When the cloth is in place the feed bar is pressed against the roller by pedal action, and the cloth travels between roller and bed, and so out on to a receiving table of polished oak on the other side. These machines are generally placed at right angles to the main shaft, but are made to be driven in any position, as also by an independent electric motor.

Power Driven Ironing Machinery 179

Fig. 154.

Size of Roller.

Length.

Width.

Height.

Ft.

In

Ft

In

Ft.

In.

Ft.

In.

Ft.

In.

12

6

X

3

6

diameter.

16

10

7

6

4

7

10

0

X

2

0

,,

13

6

6

0

4

0

9

0

X

3

6

,,

12

9

7

6

4

7

9

0

X

2

0

,,

12

6

6

0

4

0

8

4

X

2

0

,,

11

10

6

0

4

0

6

8

X

2

0

,,

10

2

6

0

4

0

6

0

X

1

4

,,

8

10

4

10

3

9

5

0

X

1

4

,,

7

10

4

10

3

9

In many laundries ironing machinery is used for flat goods alone, the shirt bodies, etc., being ironed by irons fed by forced air and gas, mixed together by an air mixing cock which connects the pipes to the flexible metallic tubes which feed the irons. Fig. 155 gives an illustration of such an installation. The width of table would be at least 5 feet for ironers on each side, and with advantage could be 6 feet, whilst the length would be regulated by local requirements.

Power Driven Ironing Machinery 180

Fig. 155.

A collar and cuff ironing and finishing machine is, however, used in most laundries of ordinary size. Fig. 156 gives one of some capacity which could with advantage be used in laundries which do a trade of 100 or more, or where a large collar business is carried on, occupying 7 feet 6 inches by 5 feet 6 inches floor space. It is built with two, three, or five metal rollers 24 inches long, heated with gas and air.

Power Driven Ironing Machinery 181

Fig. 156.

A shirt ironer (Fig. 157) is so made that a raised and sliding table is provided on which the bosom of the shirt is placed. It is then passed under the heated metal roller. Space required, 4 feet 6 inches by 2 feet 6 inches. The table is repeatedly passed backwards and forwards by hand till the shirt front is sufficiently finished.

Neck and wrist-bands of shirts have their special apparatus, taking up 2 feet 10 inches by 1 foot 8 inches space; whilst sleeve and yoke ironers are much of the same pattern, but with longer rollers and occupying 3 to 4 feet by 1 foot 8 inches floor area. The edges of collars or cuffs may require smoothing, and this is effected by first dampening them over a padded roller placed in a small water tank. The collar edge is then placed to and fro in one of the grooves of the steam-heated chest. This appliance may also be used for folding double collars.

Power Driven Ironing Machinery 182

Fig. 157.

For collars and cuffs to be perfectly finished they must be curled into shape by another special machine, which is as a rule placed on a table, and is 2 feet long by 10 inches wide. It consists of a 2 1/2-inch diameter indiarubber roller, and a polished steel roller which has a greater speed than the rubber roller, and so curls the collar or cuff.

A body ironer (Fig. 158) is used for ironing handkerchiefs, underwear, shirts, bodies, and similar articles, and as usual consists of two rollers, one clothed and the other polished. In some machines of other makes the heating surface, instead of being a roller, is a fixed metal chest under which the other roller rotates. This machine occupies 5 feet 3 inches by 2 feet 9 inches floor space, but larger machines require 7 feet 6 inches length.

Power Driven Ironing Machinery 183

Fig. 158.

Goods requiring fluting or goffering are run between two corrugated or fluted metal rollers, both of which are heated. The space required is 18 by 15 inches. This apparatus may be placed on a table if more convenient.

Several tables would most probably be required, being placed at right angles to the wall as shown in the plan of the Filey Laundry (Fig. no).

Power Driven Ironing Machinery 184