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Modern Buildings, Their Planning, Construction And Equipment. Vol6 | by G. A. T. Middleton



Miscellaneous buildings and their fittings. Builders' plant and scaffolding. South African planning and construction.

TitleModern Buildings, Their Planning, Construction And Equipment Vol6
AuthorG. A. T. Middleton
PublisherThe Caxton Publishing Company
Year1921
Copyright1921, The Caxton Publishing Company
AmazonModern Buildings

Modern Buildings, Their Planning, Construction And Equipment

By G. A. T. Middleton, A.R.I.B.A. Vice-President Of The Society Of Architects author of "building materials" "stresses and thrusts" "drainage of town and country houses" "The principles of architectural perspective" "Surveying And Surveying Instruments" Etc. Etc.

Assisted By A Specially Selected Staff Of Contributors

Profusely Illustrated

Vol. VI

Part I. Miscellaneous Buildings And Their Fittings

Part II. Builders' Plant And Scaffolding

Part III. South African Planning And Construction

List Of Coloured And Half-Tone Plates In Vol. VI

Plate I. Central Hall for the Wesleyan Mission, Liverpool . Facing page 2

II. The "Dover Castle," Waterloo Bridge Road, London, S.E. . . 20

III. Morris's Electric Machine Bakery, Richmond .. ,52

Reading Room, "Edward Pearce" Library, Darlington

IV. . . . „ 64 St. Deniol's (Gladstone Memorial) Library, Hawarden

V. Model Sanitary Steam Laundry, Southport . . . . . 68

VI. Aldershot Fire Station . . . . . . . . >> 78

VII. Domestic Interiors ..-•• 100

VIII. The Stock Exchange, Johannesburg .. 188

-Part I. Miscellaneous Buildings And Their Fittings. Chapter I. Assembly Halls
There is a large class of Assembly Halls the description of which is almost entirely covered by what has already been said in connection with Town Halls, especially when considering that of Walsall, w...
-Assembly Halls. Continued
The shape of the platform, with its front projecting out into the hall and the raised organ at the back, is admirable for the rendering of chorus music. The third-floor plan (Fig. 3) is little more...
-Chapter II. Theatres
Theatres are perhaps the most difficult of all buildings that an architect is ever called upon to plan. A considerable knowledge of stage craft is above all things necessary, for there is not only the...
-Theatres. Continued
Fig. 6. Elevation to Charing Cross Road. The entrances to the pit and gallery are both obtained in a back lane, a very excellent arrangement, as all lining-up in advance of the opening o...
-Chapter III. Protection Against Fire In Places Of Entertainment
(Contributed by P. J?. Strong) The risk of fire in a theatre is the risk to the lives often of many hundreds of people. The materials used upon the stage, the flimsy hangings and decorations, unles...
-Exits
The lives of so many being at stake, it is obviously the first duty of all responsible to provide and maintain ample and suitable exits for the immediate escape of the people. These exits should, in f...
-Site Of Theatre
Inorder torealise the latterrequire-ment it is necessary that both sides of the theatre as well as the front shall abut on streets or other thoroughfares, while in order to provide against the externa...
-Staircases
Those parts of the house that are on a level with the ground may have exits leading at once into the street, but others must make use of staircases. It is important that no part of the house shall be ...
-Notices And Illumination
Having provided ample and direct exits, it is then necessary that their whereabouts and the exact route to be taken in leaving the theatre should be clear and thoroughly indicated by large and well-li...
-Doors
All doors must open in the direction in which people pass on leaving the theatre, - that is to say, they must open outwards; and in order that they shall not in any way form an obstruction, they shoul...
-Gangways And Passages
Not only must the actual exits and exit passages and staircases be considered in respect to rapid flight; but every part of the theatre that must be traversed in order to leave it must be arranged on ...
-Proscenium Wall
Hitherto only the rapid exit of the people has been considered; but even the best arrangements in this respect may be insufficient if other principles are neglected. As before stated, nearly every fir...
-Air Currents
Apart from panic, the primary cause of nearly every fatality from fire may be put down to the subject being overcome by the fumes of combustion, and as these fumes may spread with great rapidity to al...
-Prevention Of Fire
Having provided for the rapid exit of the people from a theatre, and for their protection against the danger of being overcome by fumes, it is of further importance that material to produce a fire sha...
-Construction
All that has been said hitherto concerning theatres refers chiefly to their planning and general arrangement as far as they affect life. The actual construction has not yet been discussed. As far as i...
-Improper Use Of Buildings
Agreat source of danger exists in the use of buildings for purposes other than those for which they were originally designed. A hall intended to be used for dances does not require such extensive prov...
-Temporary Erections
Temporary wooden erections used for entertainments, bazaars, etc., unless special care be taken in their construction, may become fire traps of the worst order. Wooden stalls draped with flimsy materi...
-Churches
While considering the subject of personal safety, churches must not escape notice. The occurrence of fire in a church is by no means an uncommon event. The heating apparatus in close proximity to the ...
-Chapter IV. Inns And Public Houses
The quiet little country inn, which is unfortunately passing away in favour of the more vulgar public house and pretentious gin palace, is essentially a cottage, some rooms of which are devoted to pub...
-Inns And Public Houses. Continued
Fig. 10. Fig. 11. The arrangement of the Masonic rooms, now almost necessary in all buildings of this type, is noticeable, each of the two principal rooms being capable of being utilised...
-Chapter V. Hotels
Contemporaneously with the development of the country inn into the large public-house and refreshment bar has been its perhaps more legitimate change or growth into, first, the country hotel, and stea...
-Hotels. Continued
Fig. 16. As an example of a great modern hotel we may take the Piccadilly (Fig. 15), now in course of erection from the designs of Messrs. Wm. Woodwar, F.R.I.B.A., and Walter Emden, M.S.A., a...
-Chapter VI. Stables And Stable Fittings
(Contributed by H. C. QuEree) Horses and cows appreciate comfort, are sociable, and require careful treatment. Therefore it is our duty to make their homes pleasant, and to remove all that might be...
-Floors
Stable floors have to be impervious, easily cleaned, not slippery, and such as will not require an over steep incline for drainage, and also of such a colour as will please and give the idea of warmth...
-Drainage
With regard to the drainage proper, the client may have his special fancy as to whether he will have it on the surface or underground. It really matters little so long as the systems are efficiently l...
-Manure
The manure is removed from stables where horses or dairy cows are kept and stacked in a heap, which should be covered and so protected from the rain whilst allowing a current of air to pass over it. T...
-Horse Stables
Horses are housed in as comfortable a manner as possible, but the opinions of the owners are many and varied, and these should, above all things, be carefully studied. The loose-box of 12 by 12 feet o...
-Horse Stables. Part 2
The panelling itself should be of strong wood, such as oak or pitch-pine, and of 1 1/2, 2, or 2 1/2 inches thickness, according to the strength of the horses to be provided for. The generally accepted...
-Horse Stables. Part 3
Fig. 41. Fig. 42. Fig. 43. The latter offer a great advantage where many horses are kept and where as little time as possible is disposed to the cleaning of their stalls. The atte...
-Horse Stables. Part 4
The usual method of fastening a horse is from the centre of manger, but it may be accomplished equally well from one side or both, it being deemed advisable in some cases to tie the horse on both side...
-Cow Stables
The method of housing cattle differs in various parts of the country. Some farmers place the cows without any division between them; others give them each a stall; whilst others place them in pairs. T...
-Cow Stables. Continued
Fig. 66. Fig. 67. In this case the cattle can see one another across the passage. Should this be objected to a swinging shutter may be added, or a 9-inch brick wall built varying from 2 ...
-Piggeries
According to the older system, an enclosed house and open yard are provided for pigs, whilst the tendency of the present day is to have several pens in an enclosed building. For growing pigs a run mus...
-Chapter VII. Dairies And Dairy Fittings
(Contributed by Hedley C. Queree) Great improvements and changes have taken place in dairy construction and fittings since the days when the cream was separated from the milk in a rough and ready m...
-Hand-Working Appliances
The Tanks (Fig. 87) may be here described, being both of same construction whether for small or large dairies, differing only in matter of size. For milk and cream purposes the following are required:...
-Pasteuriser - Cooler - Regenerative Heater
It is necessary, in all cases, to render milk and cream perfectly healthy. To do this the only really safe method known at the present time is that of pasteurisation. Its purpose is to destroy all dis...
-Chapter VIII. Bakeries And Bakers' Fittings
(Contributed by Hedley C. Queree) The number of storeys of which a bakery is composed will regulate the placing of the various machines. Generally speaking, it may be taken that the flour is stacke...
-Bakeries And Bakers' Fittings. Continued
The ovens themselves, as made by special bakery engineers, may be divided into two classes, namely, drawplate and peel ovens, the former being used in preference to the latter where space allows. In t...
-Chapter IX. Library Fittings
(Contributed by H. C. Queree) A public library may be divided into four sections, namely, newspaper, magazine, reference, and lending departments. As to the newspaper department, it is, at the p...
-Library Fittings. Part 2
In the reference department the chief consideration is the comfort of the reader, who will be engaged in a study of some subject which will need his entire and undiverted attention. This should be con...
-Library Fittings. Part 3
Fig. 113. In the lending department the system to be adopted, the numerical strength of the staff, and the general arrangement of place require attention, this being the department where the pu...
-Library Fittings. Part 4
The requirements for the system are - book-card trays, issue trays, and sorting trays. In the book-card tray (Fig. 118) are placed the cards of all books in the library according to numerical order. W...
-Library Fittings. Part 5
Fig. 124. Sites are in many instances very costly, and the area at the disposal of the architect will be correspondingly restricted. In such a case it is necessary to make provision for the con...
-Chapter X. Laundry Fittings
(Contributed by H. C. Queree) In a well-appointed steam laundry, such as that erected at Filey (Fig. 132) from the plans of Mr. H. Davis, F.R.I.B.A., or that illustrated in Plate V., both of which ...
-Hand-Working Laundry Appliances
Washing appliances may consist of anything from the ordinary well-known wash tub to the revolving machine. Wash troughs, finished in white porcelain or cane glazed, may be fixed against the wall on st...
-Hand-Ironing Appliances
The next process is that of ironing, and the tables, irons, etc., to obtain a satisfactory result should be fed with a supply of gas and air, which mix together by means of special mixing valves or co...
-Power-Driven Appliances
Flannels are often washed by hand in glazed earthenware troughs, or else in power-driven machines such as the Williamson, which is made of pitch-pine carried by an iron framework. The action of the...
-Power-Driven Appliances. Continued
With an uncertain and variable climate such as ours it would be impossible to keep the ironers supplied with dry articles of clothing, etc., were it not that aid is forthcoming by mechanical means. Fo...
-Power-Driven Ironing Machinery
Table linen and other large flat pieces are ironed in one piece on a large machine. This consists of a concave bed of highly polished iron (see Fig. 154) heated by steam or gas and air. In this bed re...
-Chapter XI. Fire Stations
(Contributed by Hedley C. Queree) The pride and aim of a Fire Brigade is to arrive at the scene of conflagration as quickly as possible from the time that the call has been sent in. The method of c...
-Fire Stations. Part 2
The duty-room, when men are barracked on the premises, is furnished with ordinary tables and chairs, with ample cupboard storage-room for stationery, books, etc. Convenient space should be provided fo...
-Fire Stations. Part 3
Fig. 162. The attachment by which the horse is fastened to the stall is naturally not so secure as that which is found in an ordinary stable, and in order to prevent a horse from roaming about ...
-Chapter XII. Unclassified Buildings
There are a good number of buildings the classification of which is impossible. In some cases they appear to belong to two or three classes, or to lie midway between them, while in others they are unu...
-Unclassified Buildings. Continued
Fig. 172. The same idea of sequence of process is that which has to control an exceptional building such as a large newspaper office, like that now being erected in the Strand for the Morning Post ...
-Chapter XIII. The Decoration Of Domestic Buildings
(Contributed by Barry Parker and Raymond Unwin, MM.S.A.) In a work which is intended to be a collection of practical treatises, a chapter on styles and periods in decoration, and interior fittings ...
-The Decoration Of Domestic Buildings. Continued
The one thing we never need fear in decorating our houses is that we shall get too monotonous an effect. We can quite safely, and generally with an effect of restfulness, spaciousness, quietness, and ...
-Chapter XIV. Internal Domestic Fittings (Contributed By W. H. Brown, F.S.I.)
In selecting Ironmongery, such as door and window furniture, whether it be for a public or a domestic building, the architect cannot be too careful that the various fittings are suitable for their pur...
-Hinges
Iron hinges are generally used for softwood doors, but in good work they should be of wrought and not cast iron, the extra cost of the former being more than compensated by their greater durability an...
-Hinges. Part 2
All springs and spring hinges should, in good work, have a check action - that is to say, when the door is within a few inches of the closing point the spring should be checked and the door allowed to...
-Hinges. Part 3
Fig. 186. Fig. 187. Water-tight floor springs have a groove running round the flange of box, which is filled with rubber or other suitable substance to form a water-tight packing when th...
-Hinges. Part 4
Fig. 191, F, illustrates a simple pattern of a 4-lever mortice lock with reversible bolt for right or left-hand doors, as manufactured by Messrs. Colledge & Bridgen, with the top plate removed. At A a...
-Hinges. Part 5
Locks can also be made with two, three, or four degrees of mastership; that is to say, they can be divided into sections, sub-sections, and divisions of subsections. Each division has its master key, ...
-Hinges. Part 6
Bolt Entering. Fig. 196. Messrs. James Hill & Co.'s combination bolts and locks for folding doors are made either to shoot two ways and with 2-bolt mortice lock or to shoot three ways and with 1...
-Part II. Builders' Plant And Scaffolding. Chapter I. Plant Required For Small Building Work (Class A)
{Contributed by George Highton) The extent and varieties of builders' plant are so very considerable that it is necessary, for easy reference, to formulate the most important of them. In the follow...
-Ladders
The ordinary builder's ladder is formed of sides consisting of a straight fir-pole cut in half lengthwise, and connected by heads or rungs usually of oak or ash, preferably the former. Before the fir-...
-Steps
Steps have two sides to the necessary height, about 5 inches wide and 1 to 1 1/4 inch thick, the top and bottom being bevelled so that the steps may stand firmly and evenly at the required angle. The ...
-Trestles
When thewhitewasher,plasterer, painter, or mechanic requires to reach a few feet, say 10 to 15 feet, above ground he uses trestles to enable him to erect a platform from which he can work (see B, Fig....
-Barrows
The navvy barrow usually employed in excavating operations, and for the transference of bricks, concrete, etc., is constructed of hard wood with wrought and cast-iron fittings and steel axles. The ang...
-Cripples
The usual and simple form of cripple is shown at A in Fig. 205. This is set at an angle to suit the required slope of a ladder against the wall. In order to keep a level platform it can only be laid a...
-Buckets And Baskets
The strong galvanised iron pail or bucket is much used in small building works, having a flat hoop round the top with bottom and side straps, riveted sides and forged ears. Tipping buckets (No. 1 in F...
-Stone Lewises
There are two kinds or classes of lewises, the straight-sided and curved. The latter is inferior to the former, as, when it is fixed or fitted into the stone, any sudden twitch or jerk of the supporti...
-Drain Testing And Cleansing Appliances
Hydrostatic pressure is the system of testing drains generally adopted by the sanitary authorities in London and elsewhere. The drains are usually tested in convenient sections, being filled with wa...
-Drain Stoppers Or Plugs
When drains are to be tested for leakage it is necessary to stop them at the inspection eye, either with expanding stops or patent bag stoppers. In the latter case an air pump would be required to inf...
-Wheels And Falls
The gin-wheel (A, Fig. 213) consists of a cast-iron grooved wheel, a light steel frame, a steel shaft on which the wheel can revolve, and a strong steel hook attached to the top of the frame by which ...
-Pulley Blocks
When it is necessary to lift large pieces of material, such as steel girders, etc., which are too heavy to be handled with the gin wheel, pulley blocks (B, Fig. 213) are brought into requisition. Thes...
-Sling Chains
When a load of any kind has to be raised by means of the gin wheel or blocks and fall it usually has to be attached to the lower hook of the lifting implement by some means other than its own handle, ...
-Duckruns
The object of duckruns (Fig. 215) is to prevent damage being done by workmen to slate and tile roofs. They should be very firmly fixed against a solid resistance, or if occasion require by slinging fr...
-Mortar Boards
A mortar board is used as a bed or slab upon which mortar can be mixed or placed. It is made of four or five 9-inch boards each 3 or 4 feet long, and framed together on the under side. Its use is to p...
-The Floor Cramp
Two of these tools at least are necessary for the proper laying of floor-boards. The tool itself (Fig. 216) is a kind of elongated vice, having one jaw roughly adjustable to length by means of a pin p...
-Slater's Trusses
As will be seen from Fig. 218, the slater's truss has to form a platform to enable the slater or tiler to get at his work without kneeling on or damaging that already executed. Trusses are usually slu...
-Chapter II. Plant Required For Building Work Of Moderate Size (Class B)
(Contributed by George Highton) The ordinary contractor, engaged in work under Class B, requires to add to the plant of the jobbing builder a considerable amount of lifting tackle and yard machiner...
-The Bottle-Jack
It frequently happens during the construction of a building that some heavy piece of material, such as a roof truss, already placed roughly in position, has to be brought to its exact location. In suc...
-Chain Blocks
When only one heavy piece of material is to be raised to a given position, or other considerations make it not worth while to put crab and pulley blocks into position, chain blocks come into use. Ther...
-Screw And Hydraulic Jacks
There are many varieties of screw jacks on the market, all of them being adaptations of the bottle-jack before referred to. The only one we need notice here is the variation known as the windlass jack...
-Clips And Slings
The clips, as shown at A, Fig. 225, are practically indispensable for lifting thin slabs of stone or ashlar. They are easily adjusted, as the hook rings can be moved along the chain. The width of the ...
-Ashlar Shears
Ashlar shears (Fig. 226) are used in lifting finished dressed work, but care has to be exercised in fixing thin clips in the particular holes - which have to be made for their reception. These holes m...
-Crabs And Winches
The crab and winch handle in its simplest form is a simple application of the mechanical principle of the wheel and axle, the handle representing the wheel and the crab or drum the axle. It is used fo...
-Wire Ropes And Tightening Screws
For use as guys for derricks when heavy loads are to be handled, the wire rope has many points to recommend it. It is also advisable to use this form of rope for blocks and falls when the size of a he...
-Wire Ropes And Tightening Screws. Continued
Fig. 231. Fig. 232. Fig. 233. The Circular Saw Bench (Fig. 231) consists of a strong cast-iron frame or table, the top of which is planed true, and has a narrow slot near its cent...
-Chapter III. Plant Required For Building Work Of The Largest Size (Class C)
(Contributed by George Highton) A Mortar-Mill is indispensable on work where large quantities of mortar are required. The type illustrated (Fig. 236) is one of the most convenient forms, being comb...
-Plant Required For Building Work Of The Largest Size (Class C). Continued
Fig. 240. A Portable Gravity Mixer, such as Owen's (Fig. 240), is specially suitable for foundation and trench work, and for mixing concrete in small quantities. It consists of a steel shoot 7 f...
-Portable Engines
When the building under construction is of considerable size a portable engine becomes one of the first necessities, and sometimes two or more of these engines can be employed to advantage on differen...
-Portable Engines. Continued
Fig. 247. Horizontal Board-Cutting Machines (Fig. 248), which are now in extensive use, are chiefly employed for cutting thin boards from logs of mahogany and other valuable woods, also for cut...
-Stone-Cutting Machines
The machines necessary to deal with the shaping and dressing of stone for building purposes are not very numerous. They are, however, most important, as by judicious use of machinery in this departmen...
-Chapter IV. The Temporary Lighting Of Works During Construction
(Contributed by George Highton) Although it is usual throughout the building trade to confine the hours of working to those of daylight, it frequently happens that, for one reason or another, a bui...
-Chapter V. Cranes
(Contributed by George Highton) It is only with the forms of crane suitable to the use of builders in general that we propose to deal. The whole subject of cranes in general is of far larger scope ...
-Chapter VI. Scaffolding (Contributed By George Highton)
To enable the student to fully grasp the subject of scaffolding he should, before proceeding to read the following chapters, refer to Volume I. Part III. Chapter XIII (The Decoration Of Domestic Build...
-Derrick Stagings
The construction of Tower Gantries has already been alluded to in Volume I. Part III. Chapter XIII (The Decoration Of Domestic Buildings). The importance of carefully determining the exact position or...
-Derrick Stagings. Continued
Fig. 270. Fig. 271. As stability is essential to the erection, bracing between each bay longitudinally, and at least every second bay transversely, should be adopted. The runners should ...
-Masons' Scaffold
The Masons' Scaffold has been referred to on page 150, Volume I. Further attention may, however, be drawn to it (see Fig. 279), from which it will be seen that two parallel frames of standards and led...
-Part III. South African Planning And Construction. Chapter I. Dwelling Houses
(Contributed by H. S. East, A.R.I.B.A., Soane Medallist and Aldwinckle Student) ...
-Planning And Arrangement
Probably the climatic conditions are almost entirely responsible for the differences in the arrangement of South African houses as they exist to-day from those of other countries. The old Dutch farmho...
-Materials In General Use
Footings are usually of cement concrete, with perhaps a less proportion of cement than is used in Great Britain. Rising foundation walls are sometimes in concrete or brick built in cement, but more of...
-Suburran House
Kenilworth-Cape Town: Fig. 288. Stoep and steps are tiled, and the timberwork in gables and the supporting brackets to balcony overhanging roof are of sawn and shaped jarrah, left to weather...
-Chapter II. Shops, Offices, And Other Town Buildings
(Contributed by H. S. East, A.R.I.B.A.) The exigencies of climate and local influences, material, etc., do not affect the planning and arrangements of shop, office, and other town buildings to any ...
-Shops, Offices, And Other Town Buildings. Continued
The treatment of street verandahs and balconies in the past has been anything but satisfactory, but more uniformity of proportion is now probable, owing to the local building regulations being more de...
-Chapter III. Schools
[Contributed by H. S. East, A.R.I.B.A.) Since the war, educational progress has been very rapid, and the Governments of the various colonies, together with the school authorities, have been equally...
-Classrooms
Here, as elsewhere, classrooms, their size, aspect, shape, lighting, and ventilation, are the most important feature of the school plan, and as scholars naturally spend most of their school time in th...
-Cloak-Rooms
Owing to the somewhat scanty rainfall and the consequent disuse to a great extent of overcoats, cloaks, etc., cloak-room accommodation is not considered of vital importance. The arrangements are often...
-Latrines
In large towns and others where there is plenty of water and a drainage system is available the usual type of latrine with flushing cistern, etc., is of course in use, and where water only is laid on ...
-Chapter IV. Ecclesiastical And Public Buildings
Ecclesiastical Buildings (Contributed by H. S. East, A.R.I.B.A.) Some brief consideration of the various other buildings common to South Africa, as well as most other countries, is necessary, altho...
-Town Halls, Municipal Offices, Etc
The existing examples of municipal offices as a whole can hardly be considered to be particularly good, and generally speaking do not reach anything like the standard of the provincial buildings of th...
-Hospitals And Sanatoria
Hospital buildings have scarcely up to the present received the attention they deserve and require, and there is great need in almost all the colonies for new and up-to-date buildings of this class. ...
-Chapter V. A South African Specification
{Contributed by H. S. East, A.R.I.B.A.) The Specification as hereunder printed does not pretend in any way to be a model one, but a careful perusal of it will probably show more clearly than any ot...
-Excavator, Mason, And Bricklayer
Bricks The bricks are to be red hards, second quality throughout. Sample bricks are to be lodged with the Architects, and none of the bricks used are to be inferior in quality to those approved of....
-Plasterer
Externally Those portions of the external walls not tinted on elevations to be finished in one coat of three to one cement at least 3/4 inch thick. The walls of yard and outbuildings to be finished...
-Slater
Cover all roofs, except to w.c. and woodshed in yard, with best approved Welsh countess slates with 2-inch cover, proper gauge and side lap, and properly secured to boarding with 1 1/2-inch compositio...
-Carpenter And Joiner
Timber All timber, unless otherwise specified, to be the best imported quality of red deal, free from sap-wood, large or loose knots, shakes, and other defects, and all to be well seasoned. All tim...
-Founder And Smith
Eaves Gutter Provide and fix to eaves, including verandah, 4 1/2 by 3 1/2-inch cast-iron moulded eaves gutter of approved section, with red lead joints, fixed to requisite falls to fascia, and with...
-Gasfitter
Pay fees and make connection with nearest main, and lay on gas to point in house hereafter decided, with 3/4-inch galvanised-iron pipe. Excavate trench for same, and fill in and make good. Fix mete...
-Plumber
All lead to be the best milled lead. Flashings - Flashings and aprons throughout to be 4-lb lead flashings 6 inches and aprons 12 inches wide, neatly stepped as shown. All flashings to be groove...
-Glazier And Painter
Glass Glaze the windows throughout except where otherwise described with 21-oz. sheet glass well sprigged, back puttied, and puttied in. The sash doors and fanlights to have 26-oz. sheet glass exce...
-Painter
Knot, prime, stop, and well rub down all wood usually painted, except as hereafter mentioned, and paint same three coats of good oil colour to tints to be selected by Architect. The woodwork of dining...









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