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The Proportions Of The Human Body | by Bertram C. A. Windle



The following pages were prepared and delivered as a course of lectures for the members of the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists. I have expressed my obligations to various books from which my information has been drawn,and should like here also to add the names of the following works, of which, as will be seen, I have made much use: Marshall, 'Proportions of the Human Body'; Duval, 'Artistic Anatomy' (English translation by Frederick E . Fenton; Cassell and Co.). I have to thank the publisher of the last work for permission to reproduce some illustrations. The subject of the proportions of the human body is one of great interest to artists, and if I have beeable, by bringing together in one place the observations which have appeared upon it, to assist them in any way, I shall be well pleased.

TitleThe Proportions Of The Human Body
AuthorBertram C. A. Windle
PublisherBailliere, Tindall And Cox
Year1892
Copyright1892, 1892, Bertram C. A. Windle
AmazonThe Proportions Of The Human Body
-Introductory
In the course of lectures which, by the courtesy of the members of this society, I am permitted to commence this evening, I propose, so far as is possible to me, to lay before you an historical accoun...
-Introductory. Continued
The quest for the ideal human figure upon which, as upon a scaffolding, the artist may build up the creature of his imagination, is one which has exercised many minds, some approaching it from what I ...
-Part I. Human Body Drawing Historical Aspects
In considering the various systems of proportion it will be convenient to deal with them under the headings of the nations amongst whom they were originated or used. One of the earliest known canons i...
-Human Body Drawing Historical Aspects. Part 2
After the sculpture was finished and painted, the part was recarved, and the defective portion filled in with plaster, which, having since fallen off, furnishes us with this curious evidence of their ...
-Human Body Drawing Historical Aspects. Part 3
Such a form is exemplified by the canon of Polycletus. This statue owed its name to the fact that its parts are of perfect proportion and in harmony.' And again: 'The beauty of the human body is shown...
-Human Body Drawing Historical Aspects. Part 4
Having thus described so far as they are known the canons adopted by ancient artists, we must now turn to the consideration of those of more modern times. Amongst the Italians, Giotto (1276-1336), is ...
-Human Body Drawing Historical Aspects. Part 5
The fourth book indicates 'where and how the figures are to bend.' It is, in point of fact, 'an application of the science of geometrical projection to the drawing of the human body expressed by lines...
-Human Body Drawing Historical Aspects. Part 6
This line elongates, and in time there may be observed, as a model somewhat more complete of the future animal, a division of this line by the rudiments of vertebrae. To speak correctly, this form is ...
-Human Body Drawing Historical Aspects. Part 7
In the case of a giant, for instance, it is not sufficient to add half a module in equal proportions to the nine and a half modules representing the stature of an ordinary man in order to produce the ...
-Human Body Drawing Historical Aspects. Part 8
In order to do this I have put together all the partial results on which I believe that I can rely, have taken into account my own measurements, and have adopted the most justifiable compromise amongs...
-Human Body Drawing Historical Aspects. Part 9
Having thus cleared the ground, he proceeds to give the result of his own observations as to the proportions of the adult male and female body, the laws of growth, the influence of locality, food, pro...
-Part II. Human Body Drawing Critical Aspects
In the foregoing pages I have endeavoured, though necessarily briefly, to lay before you an account of the labours of the numerous workers in the field of proportion. It remains for me to point out, s...
-How To Draw Head and Neck
The head was by the ancients generally considered to be contained eight times in the body, though this proportion is one which, as we have already had occasion to note, is frequently departed from. I ...
-How To Draw a Trunk
There are three methods of considering the trunk as an object of measurement. The first of these is to take the measurements of the spinal column from the first dorsal vertebra to the termination. The...
-How To Draw a Trunk. Continued
Therefore in the female the diameter of the hips exceeds that of the shoulders, while in the male it is the diameter of the shoulders which exceeds that of the hips. This formula, as regards the femal...
-How To Draw an Upper Extremity
There are several methods of arriving at the measurements of the upper extremity, which may he divided into direct and indirect. The former are three in number. The first is to measure from the acromi...
-How To Draw a Lower Extremity
The difficulties of measuring this limb are even greater than those attaching to the upper, since the head of the femur is buried in the acetabulum and covered over by a mass of muscles, which render ...
-How To Draw a Lower Extremity. Part 2
When we compare the length of the foot with the leg, beginning from below upwards, we find a regular proportion and one of practical interest, viz., that from the ground to the middle of the patella u...
-How To Draw a Lower Extremity. Part 3
If now the length from the base of this triangle to the umbilicus be taken, and the differences between the child and the adult represented proportionately, it will be found that they are as 1 to 2.42...









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