Pencil Sketch Of Durham Cathedral By Kenneth Conant.

Pencil Sketch Of Durham Cathedral By Kenneth Conant.

Warning should be given that there is a vast difference between the rough, scratchy sketches of beginners and the apparently carelessly made drawings by well known men. Some students feel, evidently, that the road to success lies through imitating this extremely sketchy sort of work. They fail to realize, perhaps, that these men have learned accurate drawing in the past, and that it is equally necessary for them to acquire the ability to do careful work before they can make rough sketches intelligently. An art student, visiting a collection of lithographs by Mr. Joseph Pennell, was heard to remark that he could "take a chunk o' charcoal and do as well." Doubtless this student was ignorant of the fact that during a period of many years Mr. Pennell made hundreds of illustrations of architecture, almost photographically accurate in their drawing and wonderfully delicate in their rendering. These years of training make it possible for Mr. Pennell to produce his lithographs in a very broad, bold way, with remarkable directness and freedom, but his earlier work offers more of assistance to the beginner.

This brings us to another fact: that a man's style of rendering usually changes with the years, as the best of men are constantly striving to improve, with the result that they gradually alter their manner of work. This fact should help to make clear the folly of the beginner attempting to at once arbitrarily make a "style" of his own. If he is content, instead, to do his work as well as he knows how, searching for truth in drawing and an honest interpretation of nature's values, studying all the while other drawings in order to benefit by the experience gained by other men, and seeking always for the best way to meet the requirements of the problem at hand, he will unconsciously develop a method or style expressive of his own individual self.

It is impossible to over-emphasize the need for constant practice if one is to acquire more than ordinary skill in drawing. Many students with considerable innate ability fail to make the best use of it because of their lack of interest or perseverance, whereas others, who show at first far less natural talent, but who are endowed with an aspiration to achieve dexterity and with a willingness to work for it, often gain such skill as to far outshine those students with greater inborn aptitude. It is deplorable that so many persons fail to make the most of their natural abilities, but it is, on the other hand, most gratifying to find others who force themselves to the front through their persistency and commendable effort.

The drawings illustrating this chapter should be carefully studied as they show a variety of excellent individual treatments. The originals of most of these were done entirely with pencil, though that by Mr. Eggers on page 79 (which is, by the way, reproduced at the exact size of the original) had light washes of water color added to the pencilling, while that by Mr. Long on page 87 is really a color rendering rather than a pencil drawing. In this latter example, however, the preparation for the coloring was done in pencil, so the reproduction is shown as an illustration of a style of work in which the pencil plays a by no means unimportant, although a rather inconspicuous part-It is of interest to mention that the charming drawing by Mr. Eggers, to which we referred a moment ago, was made from his window in Milan in 1912, when he was studying as the first holder of the LeBrun Travelling Scholarship. His sketches on pages 80 and 82 were also done at about the same time, and are reproduced here directly from his sketch book, and with the exception of that at the top of page 80. showing Notre Dame, they are at the exact size of the originals so as to convey the technique as faithfully as possible.

The drawings by Mr. Conant on pages 77, 81 and 8.3, show a keen sense of appreciation and a sound knowledge of architecture, as well as remarkable skill and sensitiveness in drawing, and they are worthy of the most careful study.

On page 84 is a sketch by Andre Smith, which is notable for the direct method of drawing and the production of a wide range of values by skillful use of a very delicate line. The freshness of the drawing is due to the artist's habit of working rapidly and making a drawing at a single sitting.

The sketch by Mr. Maginnis on page 84 is handled in a masterly manner, conveying very delightfully the character and detail of an interesting architectural subject.

In the drawing on page 86 Mr. Watson has been very successful in rendering the structural strength and comparative lightness of one of New York's great modern bridges, and the activity along the water front, and in suggesting the shipping by means of smoke clouds, wisps of steam, a stack and a spar or two.

Compare these drawings with those of a similar nature in other parts of the volume or with examples which you may have at hand, noting the differences in individual style that such a comparison reveals.

View From A Window In Milan.

View From A Window In Milan. From A Drawing By Otto R. Eggers.

Pencil Sketches By Otto R. Eggers.

Pencil Sketches By Otto R. Eggers.

Pencil Sketch Of Durham Cathedral By Kenneth Conant.

Pencil Sketch Of Durham Cathedral By Kenneth Conant.

Choir Screen At Chartres. View In Tanf1eld Court.

Choir Screen At Chartres. View In Tanf1eld Court.

Pencil Sketches By Otto R. Eggers.

Cathedral. Santiago De Compostella, By Kenneth Conant.

Cathedral. Santiago De Compostella, By Kenneth Conant.

Courtesy of Arthur H. Harlow & Co.

Pencil Sketch, Segovia.

Pencil Sketch, Segovia. By Andre Smith.

Courtesy of Arthur H. Harlow & Co.

Pencil Sketch In The Rue St. Etienne Des Tonnel1ers, Rouen, By C. D. Mag1nn1s.

Pencil Sketch In The Rue St. Etienne Des Tonnel1ers, Rouen, By C. D. Mag1nn1s.

Pencil Sketch Of W1lliamsburgh Bridge, New York City. By Ernest Watson.

Pencil Sketch Of W1lliamsburgh Bridge, New York City. By Ernest Watson.

Rendering By Birch Burdette Long, The Lincoln Memorial.

Rendering By Birch Burdette Long, The Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D. C, Henry Bacon, Architect.

An Example of Water Color Rendering on Preparatory Drawing in Pencil.