Furniture Sketches of the Kind Frequently Used for Commercial Purposes.

Figure 40. Furniture Sketches of the Kind Frequently Used for Commercial Purposes. Note the Large Amount of Paper Surface Left Untouched.

A Conventional Drapery Study Combining Free Hand and Instrumental Lines.

Figure 41. A Conventional Drapery Study Combining Free-Hand and Instrumental Lines.

Note the Simplicity of Treatment.

As soon as the student has carefully studied the appearance of all these things he is ready to attempt some drawings, giving special attention to the representation of surfaces and textures. Whereas there is no harm in sketching one single object, like an upholstered chair, it is often of greater benefit to arrange compositions of several objects which are associated by use, and which offer, in addition, a variety of surfaces. Old objects such as are found in museums are especially good for practice of this sort as the textures of antiques are more varied and interesting than are those of most modern pieces. If it is not convenient to do museum work, however, things at home will answer very well. Arrange an easy chair and a table and reading lamp, for instance, in natural position to form a pleasing group, adding, perhaps, a book or magazine and such other accessories as will make the composition complete. Have the light coming from one direction if this is practical, so as to avoid complicated shadows. Then in making the drawing use the greatest care in suggesting such things as the shine of the table top and the floor, the numerous touches of highlight, and the texture of the rug and the table runner and the lamp shade. Try, as in any composition, to properly emphasize the center of interest, and give especial attention, also, to the treatment of the edges separating the light from the shade, having them clean-cut where they appear so in the objects and indefinite where such an effect seems called for. If a trial proves that it is too difficult to draw directly from objects, or if it is hard to secure suitable ones, work from photographs, instead, selecting those which show the detail quite clearly and have little effect of perspective distortion. It is sometimes advantageous to choose pictures of period furniture and furnishings for this work, for by so doing valuable knowledge of the periods may be obtained in addition to the drawing practice.

Figures 38, 39 and 40, accompanying this text, require little explanation. Figure 38 is shown mainly for the suggestions that it offers for the treatment of such textures as we find in the brickwork, the rough plaster, the hewn beams and the polished floor. It might be well to mention that when drawing such a surface as a shiny floor or table top it is well to show some lines representing the reflections of objects, and others, often in the opposite direction, indicating the surfaces of the boards themselves. A study of the floor shown here will reveal both these sets of lines and for additional examples see the top of the dressing table and the chair arms and the floors in Figure 40. Figure 40, by the way, is a more conventional type of rendering than Figure 38, for here the background is simply suggested, all of the attention being focused on the furniture itself. Such drawings as these are often used by furniture houses and for advertising work. Observe that in these particular examples comparatively little tone is used, the white of the paper counting quite strongly. Figure 41 is also a conventional rendering, the drapery itself receiving all of the attention, the architecture being merely suggested by the fewest possible lines, and here again much of the paper remains untouched. One advantage of this type of rendering is that after the student has had a reasonable amount of practice it can be done very quickly. The supplementary illustrations on the following pages should prove of great interest and value as they are excellent examples of widely different types of work. Those by Otto R. Eggers on pages 142 and 143 were made to show the client how the rooms of his house, as designed, could be made to look, - how the comparatively low ceiling and the simple window treatment would produce a dignified and home-like effect if the rooms were furnished in a suitable manner. These interiors were sketched lightly in pencil without being laid out instrumentally. The washes of water-color were then applied roughly and when dry the sketches were completed with lithographic pencil, this procedure being necessary as water-color cannot be successfully flowed over lithographic pencil lines. The drawing by Mr. Pauli on page 144 shows an entirely different handling, the whole being carefully blocked out instrumentally and finished free-hand in pencil with infinite care, some of the instrumental lines being allowed to remain. Such drawings as this are often used for catalogue purposes where furniture or lighting fixtures or things of that sort are advertised. The ceiling drawing on page 145 also combines free-hand and instrumental work, being a typical vaulting development such as is frequently employed by interior decorators, this particular study being from the office of Theo. Hofstatter & Co. From the same office is the drawing of the side table on page 146, which was done in pencil with washes of color added, this presentation effectively showing the piece in a way to give the decorator's client a clear idea of it. Now compare these drawings with others in order to learn different methods of obtaining similar effects, and. - what is still more important, - practice constantly.

Sketch By Otto R. Eggers Of A Proposed Treatment For A Living Room.

Sketch By Otto R. Eggers Of A Proposed Treatment For A Living Room.

Sketch By Otto R. Eggers Of A Proposed Treatment For A Dining Room.

Sketch By Otto R. Eggers Of A Proposed Treatment For A Dining Room.

Pencil Rendering, By Erwin J. Pauli, Of A Design For A Club Room.

Pencil Rendering, By Erwin J. Pauli, Of A Design For A Club Room.

Example of Careful Drawing of Kind Required by Manufacturers to Illustrate Catalogues, Etc.

Pencil Drawing Of Design For Decoration Of Vaulted Ceiling.

Pencil Drawing Of Design For Decoration Of Vaulted Ceiling. Theo. Hofstatter & Co.. Decorators.

Rendering In Pencil And Water Color. Table In The Louis Xvi Manner.

Rendering In Pencil And Water Color. Table In The Louis Xvi Manner. Theo. Hofstatter & Co., Decorators.