The admirable rendering by Hugh Ferriss of Bush House, London, England, on page 174, was done after the designs for the building had reached a definite stage and as the surroundings were well known it was possible to produce a drawing which conveys a very convincing and realistic impression; one which while showing considerable detail is not without atmospheric effect. A carbon pencil was used for this rendering which was made on a fairly smooth, heavy drawing board. Attention is directed also to the smaller reproductions of masterly renderings by Mr. Ferriss on pages 173 and 176.

On page 177 is an exceptional example of fine line treatment of a large building, by Chester B. Price, the subject being the new structure for S. W. Straus & Co., Fifth Avenue. New York City. Although a close inspection of this reproduction reveals that every essential detail of the architecture has been shown, the drawing has, nevertheless, a remarkable breadth of effect and a most commendable simplicity. Two other drawings of large buildings done by Mr. Price have been reproduced on page 183, opposite, and these, too, are worthy of the most careful study on the part of the student.

The sketch by Robert A. Lockwood on page 180 is a very virile interpretation of a building in course of construction. Subjects of this sort are excellent for the student to attempt.

We have already mentioned the delightful sketch by Mr. Langmann on page 181. This is one of a series which Mr. Langmann has made of interesting groupings of New York buildings, old and new, approaching his subjects in much the same way that the travelling student of architecture sketches buildings and groupings abroad. The original from which this particular reproduction was made is in lithographic pencil on white paper.

Now study and analyze all these various examples carefully and try to obtain others of your own. Copy parts of them, if you wish, but in doing so remember that the amount of reduction in size is considerable, so allow for this while doing your copying. Next go ahead with larger subjects, but in this work as in the sketching of smaller buildings it might be well to make first a number of sketches from photographs, and when larger subjects of an original sort are undertaken do not forget what we have said about the importance of the preliminary study. It is often a good plan, if an architectural rendering of a big building is being attempted for the first time, to select photographs and reproductions of renderings of similar buildings viewed from about the same point, and to keep these around you for study and comparison all the time that you are working on your preliminary study and on the final rendering itself. And above all do not lose your confidence and patience simply because the subject is large.

Building For The Hartford Connecticut Trust Company.

Building For The Hartford Connecticut Trust Company.

Benjamin Wistar Morris, Architect.

Rendering By Chester B. Price.

The Heckscher Building, New York City.

The Heckscher Building, New York City.

Warren & Wetmore. Architects.

Rendering By Chester B. Price.