Figures 36 and 37 show a variety of suggestions for the treatment of windows. Figure 36 was drawn at exactly the same scale as here reproduced, hut Figure 37 was reduced from a larger drawing measuring 8 inches by 11 inches. These sheets seem to call for no special comment in addition to that already made unless attention is directed to "6" and "12" in the latter plate. In "6" it should be noted that the open sash is shown transparent, the shadow cast by the sash itself on the wall behind being visible in its entirety. In "12," however, the sash appears as a reflector, the dark vine behind being invisible just as though the glass were opaque. These two sketches illustrate the two characteristics of glass already described.

In Figure 39 are shown several interior sketches in which windows are featured. These drawings explain themselves, though mention might be made of the fact that when facing a window or any glazed opening from the inside the sashes and frames usually appear dark in their relation to the outdoor light beyond. Because of this strong contrast even light woodwork often seems very dark if seen in silhouette.

Some Door and Window Suggestions, with Considerable Attention to the Representation of the Smaller Architectural Details.

Figure 36. Some Door and Window Suggestions, with Considerable Attention to the Representation of the Smaller Architectural Details.

Additional Details Such as Are Common to Architectural Delineation.

Figure 37. Additional Details Such as Are Common to Architectural Delineation.

When drawing an interior it is not wrong to show objects out of doors providing they are not made so prominent as to take too much interest from the interior itself. Unless such objects are quite near the glass, however, they should be drawn very simply and lightly.

Having studied the illustrations accompanying this text, as well as other reproductions that you may have at hand, and having demonstrated for yourself the truth of some of the facts mentioned here, try some studies of your own, attempting to get a glassy effect to each window, and crispness of drawing as well, remembering all the while that windows are too important to be slighted in representation.

The drawing by Schell Lewis on the following page is an unusually fine example of pencil rendering of a portion of a building drawn in elevation, and shows that even without the aid of perspective it is possible to obtain a very truthful and at the same time interesting effect. In this type of drawing a knowledge of shades and shadows is particularly desirable as the sense of relief and projection depends largely upon the form and value of the shade and shadow tones. Notice the manner in which the feeling of curvature in the goose necks above the leader boxes has been obtained, and give particular attention to the handling of the smaller detail within the shadow of the cornice of the doorway itself.

The sketches by Albert Kahn on pages 131, 132 and 133 are excellent representations of an entirely different sort of detail, for these are measured drawings made directly from examples of wrought iron and carved wood in the South Kensington Museum. Apparently a few of the main lines were laid out to scale instrumentally on a smooth coated paper and the rest of the work done free-hand. Obviously architectural students or draftsmen can profit greatly by making such measured drawings as these, as they offer not only a means of becoming acquainted with and preserving a record of the objects drawn but train one also for the making of. drawings from which original work is to be executed.

Detail Of A Country Residence Charles A. Platt.

Pencil Drawing By Schell Lewis. Detail Of A Country Residence Charles A. Platt. Architect.

Pencil Sketch By Albert Kahn. Wrought Iron Work In The South Kensington Museum.

Pencil Sketch By Albert Kahn. Wrought Iron Work In The South Kensington Museum. London, England.

Pencil Sketch By Albert Kahn. Detail Of Wood Carving In The South Kensington Museum, London.

Pencil Sketch By Albert Kahn. Detail Of Wood Carving In The South Kensington Museum, London.

Pencil Sketches By Albert Kahn. Details Of Wood Carving In The South Kensington Museum, London, England.

Pencil Sketches By Albert Kahn. Details Of Wood Carving In The South Kensington Museum, London, England.

Rendering in Wash Illustrating Effect of Reflected Light in Shadows.

Rendering in Wash Illustrating Effect of Reflected Light in Shadows, Particularly in Those Cast by Dentils Shown in the Drawing at the Right. Fragments from the Roman Forum. From H. D'Espouy's "Fragments d'Architecture Antique."