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Art and Photography Books



"Art is the only way to run away without leaving home". -- Twyla Tharp. Get your art cravings satisfied with Art and Photography Books.

Part I: Photography

-Art Principles In Portrait Photography | by Otto Walter Beck
Art in photography is possible only in an extension of the methods known and in the employment of new processes to effect a manipulation of the photo-image. When the tool is made so pliable that it records more than the surface appearance of things, when the personal element enters to give life to the accurate records, the present limitations of impersonal representation are removed from photography, and its large true sphere of influence opens. Not the subject merely, but the quality attained in the treatment of the subject, will become our chief source of delight. Several methods are used at the present time to modify the lens record. In some instances the printing paper is worked upon in such a manner as to leave undeveloped the less desirable definitions of form contained in the negative. A certain resemblance to creative work results, and much beauty has often been attained, but "picture unity" and "picture expression" have rarely been reached. Certain other factors are required to produce them. If creative work is to enter into photography, it must be possible to make on the negative a line of any character and to control the light and shade with the facility of one who paints...
-The Sinclair Handbook Of Photography | by James A. Sinclair
The aim of this book is to answer as clearly as possible many of the enquiries that are addressed to us from day to day in the course of our business. The majority of people to whom the fascination of the photographic process appeals on one ground or another, do not want to examine too minutely its scientific side...
-Modern Photography In Theory And Practice. Hand Book For The Amateur | by Henry G. Abbott
This volume has been printed for the convenience of amateur photographers. There are two kinds of amateurs, one that presses the button and allows the professional to do the rest and the other, the earnest student, who has ambition to become, in every sense of the word, a photographer. This volume was not prepared for the former, for he rarely, if ever, makes any progress, and in fact does not seek to do so. Many difficulties and obstacles are encountered by every amateur and this volume is intended to reduce these difficulties as much as possible, by giving advice and instruction, which, if followed carefully, will save the amateur's money and many perplexities and annoyances.
-The Fundamentals of Photography | by C. E. K. Mees
While a knowledge of the theory of photography is by no means essential for success in the making of pictures, most photographers must have felt a curiosity as to the scientific foundations of the art and have wished to know more of the materials which they use, and of the reactions which those materials undergo when exposed to light and when treated with the chemical baths by which the finished result is obtained. This book has been written with the object of providing an elementary account of the theoretical foundations of photography, in language which can be followed by readers without any specialized scientific training.
-Photographics: A Series Of Lessons | by Edward L. Wilson
Photography grows so rapidly, and so continuously widens its usefulness, that an occasional lesson-book must be issued in order that the working votaries of the art may keep at least alongside. During an intimate connection with it for over twenty years, nearly eighteen of which have been expended in the very whirl of its progress, - indeed, with an earnest shoulder at the wheel,- I have preferred to assist my colleagues to do the business of book- making, rather than attempt it myself, owing to the very profound sense I have always had of the responsibility and of the magnitude of the undertaking. The time, it seems to me, has come, however. when I must speak out, and no longer neglect to take my share in this matter. What follows, then, is the result of my efforts. It is for those who read such productions to decide how satisfactorily (or otherwise) I have executed the work.
-Photo Lighting | by Felix Raymer
A Treatise On Light And Its Effect Under The Skylight, Including Chapters On Skylight And Skylight Construction, Window Lighting And Dark Room Work.
-Complete Self-Instructing Library Of Practical Photography Vol 1-5| by J. B. Schriever
Back in the 70's of the last century - not so many years ago, after all - photography was in its infancy and but little practiced by the general public. The few professionals who made it their regular business prepared most of their own materials, plates, papers, etc., and the results were frequently very uncertain, as they depended largely upon local conditions, and on the skill and knowledge of the operator. Photography as applied today to the arts and sciences was unheard of. Now, there is hardly a science, industry, or enterprise of any account undertaken that photography, in some form or other, does not enter into. It is invaluable as an aid to research, study, and to the diffusion of knowledge...
-Complete Self-Instructing Library Of Practical Photography Vol 6-10| by J. B. Schriever
Back in the 70's of the last century - not so many years ago, after all - photography was in its infancy and but little practiced by the general public. The few professionals who made it their regular business prepared most of their own materials, plates, papers, etc., and the results were frequently very uncertain, as they depended largely upon local conditions, and on the skill and knowledge of the operator. Photography as applied today to the arts and sciences was unheard of. Now, there is hardly a science, industry, or enterprise of any account undertaken that photography, in some form or other, does not enter into. It is invaluable as an aid to research, study, and to the diffusion of knowledge...
-Telephotography: An Elementary Treatise On The Construction And Application Of The Telephotographic Lens | by Thomas Rudolphus Dallmeyer
This treatise is addressed to those who practise photography either for pictorial or scientific ends.
-Naturalistic Photography For Students Of The Art | by P. H. Emerson
My first and pleasantest duty is to offer my heartiest thanks to the numerous correspondents who have honoured me with sympathetic letters of approval and with valuable criticisms. Judging from these kind letters, which have poured upon me in grateful showers, my book has filled a want in art literature. These letters, coming as they do from artists of all kinds, art-masters and photographers, many of whom are perfect strangers to me, have supplied me with suggestions and criticisms which I shall make use of in a later edition, if the public so will that there be one, and some of my correspondents I shall take the liberty of publicly thanking...
-First Steps In Photography | by J. C. H. Wallsgrove
The aim of this little book is to state in a concise and simple way the simple truths in the practice of photography. As the worker progresses and it becomes necessary to make "Second Steps," it cannot be better done than by consulting a specialized work treating only upon the subject on which he is desirous of obtaining information.
-Photography In The Studio And In The Field | by E. M. Estabrooke
The most important improvement in photographic processes that has been introduced since Maynard first made collodion, and Archer discovered its adaptability to the production of photographic negatives, is the gelatine bromide dry plate.Wet plate photography had reached its utmost point of adaptability to the demands of the times. A few men of marked ability, and the skill of long study and practice, had reached the point of highest excellence in working with collodion, and the great multitude were pressing on toward that designated height to which it was given to but few to attain.
-Beginner's Guide To Photography | by A Fellow Of The Chemical Society
This is a very practical guide, in which useful advice is given how to buy a camera, and how to use it. Any beginner would be able to learn from the instructions given how to take a photograph.
-Photography | by Henry P. Maskell
In adding a volume on Photography to the Concise Knowledge Library, we have felt that we were dealing with a subject which can only be approached through the avenues of actual practice. This is true about photography, even from the historical point of view. In the beginning it was sponsored by the highest scientific authorities of the time, and leaders of science, from Faraday to Lord Rayleigh, have given of their best to bring it to its present state of perfection. And yet its fundamental processes have to be taken for granted. No chemist by taking thought could have evolved them; they were stumbled upon accidentally by empirics, and it has puzzled the scientific world ever since to explain them adequately
-Practical Color Photography | by E. J. Wall
In this little work historical and theoretical data have been as far as possible omitted. My endeavor has been to supply an elementary practical manual of the various processes of Color Photography, and no method or formula has been given that has not been personally tested in practice. This has naturally limited the scope of the work to some extent, but it has not entailed the omission of any information of practical value.
-Uncle Alberts Manual Of Practical Photography And Guide To The Reproductive Processes | By Powell Perry
Uncle Albert collecting masses of data by comparing his own density with that of a block of granite. The thoroughness with which he entered into discouraging experimental work of this kind, even at an advanced age, is truly indicative of that rugged persistence which is the earmark of the sincere seeker after knowledge. Perhaps it is inevitable that one so sweepingly versatile as my Uncle Albert should have been a little garrulous.
-Studio Light And The Aristo Eagle - A Magazine Of Information For The Profession 1909
We believe permanency is the Keystone of Photographic Success, and all brands of paper bearing our Trade-mark are manufactured on this principle. We hold our consumer's reputation and success identical with our own. We surround both with every safeguard known to chemical science and our own experience.
-Studio Light Incorporating The Aristo Eagle - The Artura Bulletin 1910
Practically every successful home portrait photographer is also a successful studio photographer, and many of these have found a simple and compact form of flash-light apparatus especially convenient for home portraiture as well as for dull-day studio sittings.
-Studio Light Incorporating The Aristo Eagle - The Artura Bulletin 1911 | by Aristo Motto
We believe permanency is the Keystone of Photographic Success, and all brands of paper bearing our Trade-mark are manufactured on this principle. We hold our consumer's reputation and success identical with our own. We surround both with every safeguard known to chemical science and our own experience
-Studio Light Incorporating The Aristo Eagle - The Artura Bulletin 1912 | by Aristo Motto
In thirty years in the photographic business there have been several revolutionary changes. Doubtless there will be many more. Whatever they may be our Policy shall be to furnish (without following every mere will-o'-the wisp) the very best of those goods which painstaking testing shall prove to be of benefit to our customers in the Simplification of Photographic Processes and the Advancement of the Art.
-Studio Light Incorporating The Aristo Eagle - The Artura Bulletin 1913 | by Aristo Motto
The Christmas business has been greater than ever before - more photographers have been advertising than ever before, and more people have been having pictures made. They have been reminded by almost every magazine they have looked over for Christmas suggestions that photographs make very desirable presents and that there is a photographer in their town. Naturally, the photographer who advertised got the bulk of this business.
-Studio light a magazine 1914 | by Sara F. T. Price
A few clever photographers down there having taken prizes in the earlier of these competitions, their neighbors became interested and went after the perfectly good but by no means easy money. If as large a proportion of the best photographers in all the rest of the country would go into these competitions we would be obliged to engage our judges by the year.
-Studio Light A Magazine 1915 | by Sara F. T. Price
The reason seems not far to seek. Philadelphia is interested. It furnished a tremendously large proportion of entries. A few clever photographers down there having taken prizes in the earlier of these competitions, their neighbors became interested and went after the perfectly good but by no means easy money. If as large a proportion of the best photographers in all the rest of the country would go into these competitions we would be obliged to engage our judges by the year.
-Studio Light A Magazine 1916 | by Sara F. T. Price
The harshness of contrast may be materially subdued, but the result is not brilliancy. A greater number of tones cannot be produced because they are not in the negative. Yet the passable result secured in printing is allowed to pass and under-exposure becomes a habit...
-Studio Light Incorporating The Aristo Eagle - The Artura Bulletin 1917 | by Aristo Motto
There are still a few people who talk of the good old days, the good old methods, the good old quality, etc., and go right along following the line of least resistance instead of holding on to the good things of the old days that have not been bettered.
-Studio Light A Magazine 1918 | by Sara F. T. Price
We will win the war, but the sooner we know what is required and the sooner we bend every effort to furnish the vital needs of our armies, just that soon can we say we are doing our bit. The longer the delay the greater will be the cost, not alone in dollars and cents, but in life and happiness.With billions in money our Government is unable to buy one of the vital necessities of modern warfare. With millions of men, ample food, clothing, guns and munitions, we are unable to equip one of the most important divisions of our army with the necessary material to intelligently and efficiently direct our guns and human fighting forces.
-Studio Light Incorporating The Aristo Eagle - The Artura Bulletin 1919 | by Aristo Motto
Film has decided advantages over plates in almost every branch of photographic work, but in none is the advantage more marked than in flash-light work. The day has passed when photographers will depend entirely upon daylight, just as the day has passed when portraiture of the better sort is entirely a matter of studio sittings. Practically every successful home portrait photographer is also a successful studio photographer, and many of these have found a simple and compact form of flash-light apparatus especially convenient for home portraiture as well as for dull-day studio sittings.
-Studio Light Incorporating The Aristo Eagle - The Artura Bulletin 1922 | by Aristo Motto
The past year has been a rather trying one for all kinds of business, yet you have weathered it and can see better buisness ahead. If accounts are to be relied upon, Christmas business was good. People have turned to photographs as a solution of their gift making problems because photographs are not expensive. There is a personal touch to the gift of a photograph - a sentiment that can not be measured in dollars and cents and that does not place an obligation upon the one who receives it.
-Studio Light A Magazine 1923 | by Sara F. T. Price
But there is really more to the idea of setting the studio apart from commercial surroundings than merely to gain the conveniences that one can build into a studio designed specially for photographic work. There is greater privacy - there is more of the atmosphere of a home of refinement and there is more opportunity to make the studio and its surroundings beautiful, all of which materially adds to the advertising value of a so-called residence studio.

Part II: Drawing and Painting

-Sketching And Rendering In Pencil | by Arthur L. Guptill
Many readers of Pencil Points have suggested to us the need for a group of books dealing in a thoroughly practical and helpful way with subjects of interest to architects, draftsmen and students - a library embracing the varied interests that centre in the drafting room.
-The Elements Of Drawing & The Elements Of Perspective | By J. M. Dent & Sons
At that exhibition, the practice and the materials, the familiar David-Roberts grey paper, the Harding pencil effects, the washes and colours, cold or glowing, that marked Ruskin the artist and master of drawing, were so arranged as to recall him almost in the very act.
-Constructive Anatomy | by George B. Bridgman
The drawings that are presented here show the conceptions that have proved simplest and most effective in constructing the human figure. The eye in drawing must follow a line or a plane or a mass. In the process of drawing, This may become a moving line, or a moving plane, or a moving mass. The line, in actual construction, must come first. But as mental construction must precede physical, so the concept of mass must come first, that of plane second, that of line last think in masses, define them in lines.
-The Proportions Of The Human Body | by Bertram C. A. Windle
The following pages were prepared and delivered as a course of lectures for the members of the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists. I have expressed my obligations to various books from which my information has been drawn,and should like here also to add the names of the following works, of which, as will be seen, I have made much use: Marshall, 'Proportions of the Human Body'; Duval, 'Artistic Anatomy' (English translation by Frederick E . Fenton; Cassell and Co.). I have to thank the publisher of the last work for permission to reproduce some illustrations. The subject of the proportions of the human body is one of great interest to artists, and if I have beeable, by bringing together in one place the observations which have appeared upon it, to assist them in any way, I shall be well pleased.
-Is It Art? Post-Impressionism. Futurism. Cubism. | by J. Nilsen Laurvik
I believe that nothing happens arbitrarily either in nature or in Society. Nor do I believe there is anything absolutely useless either in the thought or in the acts of humanity.Frequently where we see only perturbations, as in geological convulsions, there is only the harmonious development of a law; these perturbations are an element of progress and that is why I don't quite agree with certain of my colleagues who persist in judging the latest phase of the evolution of plastic expression from the fixed bias of a formulated criteria that does not take into consideration the past, nor looks into the future.

Part III: Arts

-The Arts And Crafts Of Ancient Egypt | by W. M. Flinders Petrie
This present handbook is intended to aid in the understanding of Egyptian art, and the illustrations and descriptions are selected for that purpose only. The history of the art would require a far greater range of examples, in order to illustrate the growth and decay of each of the great periods; whereas here only the most striking works of each period are shown, m order to contrast the different civilisations. The origins and connections of the art in each age are scarcely touched, and the technical details are only such as are needed to see the conditions of the art. The archaeology of the subject would need as wide a treatment as the history, and these subjects can only appear here incidentally.
-The Arts and Crafts of Older Spain | by Leonard Williams
In preparing these volumes, it has been my aim to give a clear and fairly complete account of the arts and crafts of older Spain. It seems to me that there is room for a work of this design and scope, and that there is no reason why so attractive a subject - or rather, group of subjects - should be perpetually ignored by persons who travel through, or who profess to feel an interest in, the country of the Cid and of Don Quixote.
-Ideals In Art: Papers Theoretical Practical Critical | by Walter Crane
The collected papers which form this book have been written at different times, and in the intervals of other work. Most of them were specially addressed to, and read before the Art Workers' Guild, as contributions to the discussion of the various subjects they deal with; so that they may be described as the papers of a worker in design addressed mainly to art workers. They are not, however, wholly or narrowly technical, and the point of view frequently bears upon the general relation of art to life.









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