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Beginner's Guide To Photography | by A Fellow Of The Chemical Society



This is a very practical guide, in which useful advice is given how to buy a camera, and how to use it. Any beginner would be able to learn from the instructions given how to take a photograph.

TitleBeginner's Guide To Photography
AuthorA Fellow Of The Chemical Society
PublisherPerken, Son & Rayment
Year1891
Copyright1891, Perken, Son & Rayment
AmazonBeginner's Guide To Photography

Showing How To Buy A Camera And How To Use It.

Including Practical Remarks Upon Photographic Apparatus Generally - How To Take A Photograph - Development - Printing From The Negative - Taking Instantaneous Pictures - Producing Lantern Slides - Photo Micrography And Enlarging.

By A Fellow Of The Chemical Society.

-Choice Of Apparatus
The photographic aspirant will probably find very great difficulty in choosing suitable apparatus with which to make a commencement. He will see by various advertisements that apparatus can be purchas...
-Choice Of Apparatus. Part 2
A still more compact camera is shewn at page 110. This form possesses all the advantages of that just described, but its movements are simplified in such a manner that it can be unfolded, and made rea...
-Choice Of Apparatus. Part 3
Again, should a drawing, map. or other such design require to be copied, it can be easily accomplished by reversing the position just described and pointing the lens downwards towards the floor, where...
-Photographic Lenses
The most simple form of camera lens, is that known as the single view lens. In reality it does not consist of a single piece of glass, but of two, sometimes three cemented together, so as to appear, w...
-Taking A Photograph
The operations involved in taking a photograph may be roughly grouped under two heads. Firstly, the optical part of the business, and secondly, the chemical part. Luckily these two divisions can now b...
-Taking A Photograph. Continued
It is quite impossible to write down anything definite with regard to the length of time for which the lens must be uncovered. If we had only one particular subject to photograph, and this subject wer...
-Development
A Photographic beginner will be apt to imagine that if a plate has been exposed in the camera, that it will at once bear an image of the subject upon which it has been exposed, and he will probably be...
-Development. Part 2
We now proceed to spoon out 3 grains of pyrogallic acid into the developing cup. The first time or two we take the trouble to weigh out that quantity, but afterwards we can easily guess the amount by ...
-Development. Part 3
The method of development which we have detailed is as simple as any, and will be found suitable to any plates in the market. Its fault, if it have one, is that the pyrogallic acid is used dry, and be...
-Development. Part 4
It cannot be too weak, and, indeed, I take it as a good test of the suitability of its strength, if the developer begin to act in from half-a-minute to a minute. If any earlier signs are visible, the ...
-Printing From The Negative
The work of printing is one in which amateurs as a rule do not excel. The reason for this is that it not only requires a liberal amount of patience, which in these go-a-head times is a virtue not much...
-Exposure In The Printing Frame
The photographic printing frame is made of wood, generally teak, and can be bought in the usual sizes of plates. The negative fits into a rebate, and is placed in position film side upwards. Upon this...
-Toning
When the print is removed from the frame it is of a dark red colour, very different from the tint of an ordinary finished photograph. To correct this, and to give it a more pleasing colour, is the obj...
-Instantaneous Pictures
One of the most noticeable features of modern dry plates is their intense rapidity. When a non-photographer reads that certain pictures of trotting horses have been taken in the 2,000th part of a seco...
-Lantern Pictures
The magic lantern has long been a favourite instrument with children, and under past conditions, when the pictures thrown by it were hand painted, and were little better than rough daubs; it was only ...
-Lantern Pictures. Part 2
In making transparencies we must be as particular in keeping the hypo, solution at a respectful distance, as we must be during the operation of toning prints. And this is best achieved by not mixing a...
-Lantern Pictures. Part 3
Hitherto, in dealing with the production of lantern slides, we have supposed that the negative employed is of such a size that it can be reproduced as a positive by contact printing in the ordinary pr...
-How To Enlarge Small Photographs
The amatuer photographer who on the score of expense or because of its greater portability elects to purchase a small camera rather than a large one, will always have the satisfaction of reflecting th...
-How To Enlarge Small Photographs. Continued
Those who depend upon daylight, especially dwellers in London, or other large cities and towns, have many a day of disappointed hopes. But they need not despair, for enlargements can be taken during t...
-Apparatus For Photomicrography
Workers with the Microscope are generally desirous of obtaining pictorial records of many of the objects whose structure that wonderful instrument allows them to examine. Hitherto such records have be...
-Apparatus For Photomicrography. Continued
After the lamp is lighted and all adjustments made, the apparatus may with advantage be allowed to rest for a short time, for the heat concentrated on the lenses, etc., is likely to cause slight expan...
-Exposure
The Following Article On Exposure Is Kindly Contributed By A. S. Platts, Esq; To the beginner in Photography the question presents itself, how long shall the cap remain off the lens during an exposu...
-Films And Paper Negatives. Photo-Mechanical Printing Processes
The introduction of films and paper as supports for the sensitive emulsion, whilst it was received with acclamation by amateurs, has after extended trial proved extremely disappointing. The advantages...
-Films And Paper Negatives. Photo-Mechanical Printing Processes. Continued
Solutions used in developing the film should not exceed a temperature of 75 deg. Fahr., and the fingers should only touch the films at the corners while wet. Printing from these films may be done from...
-Printing From The Negative By The Ferro-Prussiate, Bromide, Platinotype And Carbon Processes
On pages 32, 33, and 34, will be found complete directions for printing upon silver-albumenized paper, but here it is proposed to give concise directions for obtaining prints from a negative in other ...
-Bromide Paper
By means of this, prints can be obtained more quickly than by any other process, but there is more trouble as the image is invisible till developed. The paper is coated with an emulsion the same as a ...
-Alpha Paper
This is somewhat similar to Bromide Paper, but yields prints more resembling albumenized prints by a little manipulation in exposing and developing. The paper may be exposed in the ordinary printing f...
-The Cold Process
A modification of the above process has been introduced, in which, paper-coated with an iron salt, ferric oxalate, is exposed under a negative, till the image is distinctly visible, and it is then dev...
-Gelatino-Chloride Or Chloride Emulsion Printing-Out Paper
This paper which is made by precipitating Chloride of Silver in a solution of Gelatine so as to make what is technically called an emulsion, and coating paper with the same, will in many instances giv...
-Hydroquinone Or Quinol Development
In the chapter on Development (pp. 18-31), full instructions have been given for the processes of Alkaline Pyro and Ferrous Oxalate development, but latterly Hydro-quinone or Ouinol has come to the fr...
-Detective Or Hand Cameras
During the last twelve months a subject which has attracted much attention, is the use of detective or hand cameras; which may be defined as apparatus, by means of which photographs may be taken witho...
-Detective Or Hand Cameras. Continued
Having thus briefly considered the essentials for a hand camera, it only remains for us to give one or two general hints which may be of service. First, as to the plates to be used for ordinary instan...
-Photo-Mechanical Printing Processes
So far this manual has treated of the production of negatives by photography, rather for the purpose of amusement than for any large commercial project, but it must not be supposed that the province o...
-Advertisements And Reviews
The Magic Lantern: ITS CONSTRUCTION and USE. Copyright. PUBLISHED BY PERKEN, SON, & RAYMENT, 99, HATTON GARDEN, E.C. [FOR PRESS OPINIONS SEE OVER. PRESS OPINIONS. - The Magic Lantern: Its...
-Advertisements And Reviews. Part 2
Chemist And Druggist 'Intensity Coils.' By 'Dyer.' London : Perken Son and Payment, 99, Hatton Garden. 1s. This is one of those valuable little popular manuals which convey a sound elementary kno...
-Advertisements And Reviews. Part 3
By I. H. Jennings. Also, A CHAPTER ON PREPARING BACTERIA. By Dr. R. L. Maddox. Price 3s., per post 3s. 2d. The Spectroscope And Its Relation To Photography By C. Ray Woods, Price 6d., per post 7d. ...
-Press Opinions. Beginner's Guide To Photography
Land And Water The Beginner's Guide to Photography. Anyone who had never taken a photograph in his life could go to work with confidence with this guide by his side. Invention 'Beginner's Guide ...
-Press Opinions. Beginner's Guide To Photography. Part 2
Court Journal Messrs. Perken, Son and Rayment, one of the largest and most popular makers of photographic apparatus, publish a most useful little work entitled, ' Beginner's Guide to Photography,' i...
-Press Opinions. Beginner's Guide To Photography. Part 3
City Press 'Beginner's Guide to Photography.' (Perken, Son and Rayment.) To the unlearned in the science of photography, this little work, which has now reached its sixteenth thousand, will prove ex...









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