To change bromide prints from blue-black to sepia tones they must first be thoroughly washed to free them from all traces of hypo or developer. Then tone them by rocking in a tray containing the following:

Uranium Toning Solution. Potassium Ferricyanide (not Ferrocyanide)...............................36 grs. Uranium Nitrate............................................................32 grs. Acetic Acid.................................................................25 drams. Water.......................................................................84 ozs.

Dissolve the ferricyanide in the water and let in stand for a few minutes, add the acid and then the nitrate and filter.

Should any precipitate form during the toning, filter the solution again, wash out tray and proceed once more. If the precipitate is allowed to remain it will discolor the print. Do not use iron or enameled trays while using this solution. Use glass or porcelain and keep trays clean. Let the toning proceed a little deeper than desired in the finished print and wash in running water until the print is free from the yellow color, which will be about twenty minutes. This solution will not keep and only enough should be made up for immediate use. If the highlights are still discolored immerse the prints in a solution of one drop of strong ammonia to 12 ounces of water but allow the print to stay in this solution but a few seconds and then wash.

Bromide paper may be manipulated to such an extent that a print need rarely be thrown away as poor or useless. The print may be green from over-exposure or have a muddy background and may still be converted into a fairly good print. If it is over-exposed it may be toned in Uranium as given above and if over-exposed and over-developed it should first be reduced in a solution of

Red Prussiate of Potash.................................................... 2 drams.

Hypo........................................................................ 1 oz.

Water.......................................................................16 ozs.

The print should be reduced a little more than the density required in the finished result and then washed thoroughly. This is applicable to prints which have been under-exposed and over-developed in an effort to bring out details, which resulted in a print with muddy background. The reducer may be applied locally with a brush as suggested for negatives, allowing the reducer to run away from those parts which do not need reduction and frequently splashing the print with water. When unsatisfactory tones are produced they can be changed or modified to almost any extent by the use of gold, uranium, copper or iron. Gold produces a rich blue-black, uranium we have explained, copper gives various colors from a purple black to a red and iron various shades of blue, depending on the length of development. The print after washing should, for a blue-black tone, be immersed in

Ammonium Sulpho-Cyanide..................................................30 grs.

Water to.....................................................................10 ozs.

Gold Chloride.................................................................. 2 grs.

The sulpho-cyanide is first dissolved in water and then the gold is added. Toning will proceed rapidly and may be performed in subdued daylight. When the proper tone is reached wash in several changes of water and fix for a quarter of an hour.

For red tones make a one per cent solution of copper sulphate and add to this a saturated solution of carbonate of ammonia until the first formed precipitate is re-dissolved. To this add three grains of potassium ferricy-anide to each ounce of the above. The toning takes place somewhat slowly and starts with a blue-black but if continued it changes to a brilliant red. If a blue tone is desired use

Potassium Ferricyanide.......................................................5 grs.

Ferric Oxalate................................................................. 5 grs.

Water to.....................................................................20 ozs.

Various colors of blue may be secured according to lenth of toning.

An unsatisfactory print can be bleached out in the following bath and when well washed may be re-developed to any desired shade:

Potassium Bichromate......................................................15 grs.

Alum..........................................................................75 grs.

Hydrochloric Acid.......................................................... 1 dram.

Water.................................................-...................... 4 ozs.

After a thorough washing the prints must be fixed and again washed.

Velox Paper.

This is a form of bromide developing paper which is not as sensitive as the ordinary bromide papers and the paper may be placed in the printing frame by means of gas or subdued daylight. It may be printed by electric light or will print in from one to eight seconds by diffused daylight, say a few feet from a window having a north exposure. It may also be printed by means of gaslight or a kerosene burner at a distance of three or four inches from the negative in one or two minutes. Six forms of this paper are put upon the market by the manufacturers and are known respectively as "Carbon," a matt paper; "Glossy," an enameled paper; "Rough," a slightly pebbled surface; "Special Portrait," a half matt; "Special Glossy," with enameled surface and "Special Rough." The "Special" papers require less exposure than the ordinary.

After exposure, develop with either of the following developers: