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Naturalistic Photography For Students Of The Art | by P. H. Emerson



My first and pleasantest duty is to offer my heartiest thanks to the numerous correspondents who have honoured me with sympathetic letters of approval and with valuable criticisms. Judging from these kind letters, which have poured upon me in grateful showers, my book has filled a want in art literature. These letters, coming as they do from artists of all kinds, art-masters and photographers, many of whom are perfect strangers to me, have supplied me with suggestions and criticisms which I shall make use of in a later edition, if the public so will that there be one, and some of my correspondents I shall take the liberty of publicly thanking...

TitleNaturalistic Photography For Students Of The Art
AuthorP. H. Emerson
PublisherSampson Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington Limited
Year1891
Copyright1891, Sampson Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington Limited
AmazonNaturalistic Photography For Students Of The Art

By P. H. Emerson, B.A., M.B. (Cantab.) Author Of " Pictures Of East Anglian Life," " Pictures From Life In Field And Fen," " Idyls Of The Norfolk Broads," And Joint Author Of "Life And Landscape On The Norfolk Broads."

"Beauty is truth, truth beauty, - that is all Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know."

Keats, "Ode on a Grecian Urn."

To The Memory Of Adam Salomon, Sculptor And Photographer, Chevalier De I'ordre De La Legion D' Honneur, This Work Is Dedicated By The Author, As A Tribute Of Admiration And Respect For The First Artist Of Acknowledged Ability Who Was Original Enough To Practise Photography For Its Own Sake, And Who Was Brave Enough To Appear Before A Prejudiced Art World As A Photographer As Well As A Sculptor.

Bonne renommee vaut mieux que ceinture doree.

-Preface To Second Edition
My first and pleasantest duty is to offer my heartiest thanks to the numerous correspondents who have honoured me with sympathetic letters of approval and with valuable criticisms. Judging from these ...
-Naturalistic Photography. Introduction
Daguerre And The French Academy At a meeting of the French Academy of Sciences, held in Paris on the 19th day of August, 1839, Louis Jacques Mande Daguerre, in the presence of the flower of Parisian ...
-Naturalistic Photography. Part 2
Engineering, Medicine And Biology The horny-handed engineer, too, is wooing her; he makes love to her away down in dark caissons half-buried in river beds; whilst above-ground she scatters his plans ...
-Naturalistic Photography. Part 3
The influence of photography on painting, on the other hand, has been nothing short of marvellous, as can be seen in the great general improvement in the drawing of movement. It is a common practice f...
-Naturalistic Photography. Part 4
Branches Of Photography From what has been said it is very evident that the practice of photography must be very different in the different branches of human knowledge to which it is applied. The ap...
-Naturalistic Photography. Part 5
The Art Of Photography. A. - Art Division In this division the aim of the work is to give aesthetic pleasure alone, and the artist's only wish is to produce works of art. Such work can be judged only...
-Naturalistic Photography. Part 6
A College Of Photography And Diplomas We fondly hope that a college of photography may one day be instituted, where a good art and science training may be obtained, where regular classes will be held...
-Book I. Terminology And Argument
The dignity of the snow-capped mountain is lost in distinctness, but the joy of the tourist is to recognize the traveller on the top. The desire to see, for the sake of seeing, is, with the mass, alo...
-Artistic
A word greatly misused by photographers. When applied to a person, it means one trained in art, and when applied to a work, it means leaving the impression of an artist's handiwork; and this photograp...
-Ideal
A volume might be written on this word, but it would be a volume of words with little meaning. As applied to art, the meaning of ideal has generally been that of something existing in fancy or in im...
-Naturalism
By this term we mean the true and natural expression of an impression of nature by an art. Now it will immediately be said that all men see nature differently. Granted. Bat the artist sees deeper, pen...
-Realism
By Naturalism it will be seen that we mean a very different thing from Realism. The realist makes no analysis, he is satisfied with the motes and leaves out the sunbeam. He will, in so far as he is ab...
-Transcript Of Nature
'A mere transcript of nature' is one of the stock phrases of the art critic, and of many artists of a certain school. The precise meaning attached to it puzzles us; were it not always used as a term ...
-Chapter II. Naturalism In Pictorial And Glyptic Art
An Inquiry Into The Influence Of The Study Of Nature On Art In this chapter we shall endeavour to trace the influence of the study of nature on all the best art up to the present day. In order to do ...
-Egyptian Art
On examining specimens of Egyptian art, whether it be their paintings, architecture, sculpture or book illustrations (the papyri), one is struck by the wonderful simplicity, decision and force with wh...
-Monarchies Of Western Asia
Assyrian art differed from that of Egypt in that the outline of the figures was much stronger, and that they painted their bas-reliefs; but the imitation of nature was the watchword in Assyria, as i...
-Ancient Greek And Italian Art
In discussing Greek painting we shall rely entirely upon the erudite historical work of Messrs. Woltmann and Woer-mann,giving a short resume of their remarks on the subject. No Greek Paintings Extant...
-Ancient Greek And Italian Art. Part 2
The The-Ban-Attic School There was a third school of Greek painting, that called the Theban-Attic, and of this we read that there was a great ease and versatility, and an invention more intent upon ...
-Ancient Greek And Italian Art. Part 3
Vases, Mosaics, Ac, Etc Besides the written testimony referred to, the state of art can be gathered from the vases, bronzes, mosaics, paintings on stone, and mural decorations which have come down to...
-Ancient Greek And Italian Art. Part 4
Let us turn to No. 33, - the sensual face of Commodus, - he re-lives in the marble. Another very notable bust is that of Homer (No. 117), in the corner of the gallery at right angles to that we are le...
-Early-Christian Art
Leaving Greek art, we now come to the art of the early Christians. Woltmann and Woermann tell us that Early Christian art does not differ in its beginnings from the art of antiquity. . . . The only p...
-Mediaeval Art
Mediaeval Miniaturists. Charlemagne. Ivan the Terrible. We have followed Messrs. Woltmann and Woermann closely in their account of the decadence of art from the greatest days of Greek sculpture an...
-Mediaeval Art. Part 2
Another epoch-maker, Giotto, now appears. He seems to have been a remarkable man in himself, which however hardly concerns us. The historian of his works says, The bodies still show a want of indepe...
-Mediaeval Art. Part 3
The Guilds Artists at this time belonged to one of the seven higher of the twenty-one guilds into which Florentine craftsmen were divided, namely, that of the surgeons and apothecaries (medici and sp...
-Eastern Art. Mohammedan Art
Before beginning the renascence we must glance through Mohammedan, Chinese, and Japanese art. With Mohammedan art we have little to do, as it was entirely decorative. It is seen at its best in the Alh...
-Chinese And Japanese Art
China and Japan. First period. Buddhism. In China and Japan things were very different. Following Mr. Anderson's invaluable work, the Pictorial Arts of Japan, we find that their history of pictori...
-Chinese And Japanese Art. Continued
Matahei K6rin. We are told that Matahei tried to found a naturalistic school, whose followers should go direct to nature for their subjects, but the movement did not receive any hearty impulse. Howe...
-The Renascence
This is a period of a return to the study of nature, of a carrying out of the feelings which seemed to be developing even in Giotto's time. No longer now was the artist to be separated from nature by ...
-Germany
Albert Durer Turning now to Germany, we shall see what the best men there thought of naturalism. The movement towards the study of nature seems to have begun in the methods of engraving as practised ...
-Germany. Part 2
Hans Holbein The next great German was Hans Holbein the younger. He had advantages over Durer, for he was born when the feeling for nature was strong, and thus started with a clear mind, and arrived ...
-Germany. Part 3
Raphael And Cor-Reggio Raphael4 and Correggio we will quickly dismiss, though we are fully aware of the £70,000 reputation of the one, and the literary reputation of the other. Raphael does not ap...
-From The Renascence To Modern Times
We shall now glance over the works of the great artists throughout Europe from the time of the Renascence period downwards, and see how and what influence Naturalism had on them, and we shall inquire ...
-English Art
The English painters of note begin with Hogarth, though the bad work of Lely and Kneller is cited as English, because executed in England, yet neither of these two men was English, and no lover of ar...
-English Art. Part 2
Water-Colours Now we come to a branch of art which is essentially English, namely, painting in water-colours. It is not meant by this that water-colour is a new medium, or that the English water-colo...
-English Art. Part 3
Crome Crome, who was, in our opinion, a better painter than Constable, was like him a naturalist, and true to his faith. There is an amusing scene in his life, which we will quote. A brother of the ...
-American Art
Sargent. Harrison. Hunt. Whistler. Sargent and Harrison. Whistler, has been the reform in hanging pictures; though he has not been allowed to carry out his plans thoroughly, yet he has managed h...
-Dutch Art
The first mighty name of the modern period is that of Rembrandt Van Ryn. Holland, by her bravery, had thrown off the Spanish yoke, and with it the crushing yoke of Catholicism, and stood free to follo...
-Dutch Art. Continued
Leaving with regret the great Rembrandt, we pass over several smaller but often-quoted names, the most influential name we come to is Van Ostade, another naturalist of great power, of whom we have alr...
-France
And now, lastly, we come to France - France where art has in modern times reached its highest level. France has in modern times always been the leader of civilization in Europe, and even now she is in...
-France. Part 2
I therefore conclude that the beautiful is the suitable. . . . Understand that I do not speak of absolute beauty, for I do not know what it is, and it seems to me only a tremendous joke. I think peopl...
-France. Part 3
We can start from any point and arrive at the sublime, and all is proper to be expressed, provided our aim is high enough. Then what you love with the greatest passion and power becomes a beauty of y...
-France. Part 4
Bastien-Lepage Bastien-Lepage we had judged from reproductions, but we find lately, on seeing some of his work, that we had all along misjudged him, thinking him a much greater painter than he really...
-France. Part 5
Vittore Pisano Burlington House, is fresh in our mind. There is the work in dark marble, looking as fresh, beautiful, lifelike, and artistic, as it did the day it left the artist's hand. What simplic...
-Chapter III. Phenomena Of Sight, And Art Principles Deduced Therefrom
Introduction Having thus demonstrated that the best artists have always tried to interpret nature, and express by their art an impression of nature as nearly as possible similar to that made on the r...
-Light
A. Light. I. Physical Characters Of The Eye As An Optical Instrument If a ray of light passes through a small hole into a darkened room (pin-hole camera), an image is formed of the object or objects ...
-Light. Continued
Macula Lutea In addition to this the macula lutea is less sensitive to weak light than other parts of the retina. The effect of all these imperfections is to blur and dull the perfect image. The seri...
-C. Intensity
A quotation from Helmholtz will best illustrate this point. He says, If the artist is to imitate exactly the impression which the object produces on our eye, he ought to be able to dispose of bright...
-C. Intensity. Continued
If now, you return to the daylight, which before was perfectly comfortable, it will appear so dazzling that you will, perhaps, have to close your eyes, and only be able to gaze round with a painful gl...
-D. Colour
As photographers, the matter of colour exercises us but indirectly, still the subject should be understood, on account of its bearing on painting. Colour perception, says Le Conte, is a single perc...
-E. Binocular Vision - Psychological Data
Single Image The remarks already made would apply equally well to man if he were a one-eyed animal, but we find there are other considerations to take into account since man is two-eyed. Now the phen...
-Size, Solidity
Thus, then, in taking a photograph we must remember that theoretically speaking, up to twenty feet the picture can be made sharper all over than beyond that distance; for the eye has all these perspec...
-What A Picture Is
To begin with, it must be remembered that a picture is a representation on a plane surface of limited area of certain physical facts in the world around us, for abstract ideas cannot be expressed by p...
-Tone And Atmosphere
Proceed we now to discuss the component parts of this impression. When we open our eyes in the morning the first thing we see is light, the result of those all-pervading vibrations of ether. The effe...
-On The Impression. Rule For Focussing
The reason we prefer pictures which are not too bright lies in the fact that the eye cannot look long at very bright paintings without tiring. As a physical fact, too, the most delicate modelling and ...
-Book II. Technique And Practice. The Camera And Tripod
Artists are supposed to pass their lives in earnest endeavour to express through the medium of paint or pencil, thoughts, feelings, or impressions which they cannot help expressing, and which cannot ...
-Square Cameras
Length The student will of course remember that his camera must be square in order to have a reversing frame fitted, but that makes no difference to the dark slides. Having then fixed on the size of ...
-Tripods
The tripod head should be preferably of tough wood covered with felt. A metal tripod head is apt to endanger the woodwork of the camera, even when covered with leather. The legs should be simple and f...
-Setting Up The Camera
Having decided on these matters, we will suppose the novice is now provided with camera and tripod. Now for a few details about starting. In setting up the camera on its tripod, one leg should be plac...
-Swing-Backs
The effect of the horizontal and vertical swing-back is identical, as is obvious if the camera be placed on its side, for the horizontal swing becomes vertical, and vice versa. If the camera be set up...
-Hand Cameras
A good form of small camera to be carried in the hand is a great desideratum for artistic studies. Exquisite studies of figures, birds, and all sorts of animal life could be made with such a contrivan...
-Chapter II. Lenses
Optics. Ganot's Physics We do not intend to incorporate in this chapter elementary optics, as the subject is well known to most educated men, but in case any reader should know nothing of light and o...
-Lenses. Part 2
Experiment For Finding A Rough Rule For The Use Of Lenses The next question is, what proportion, as a rule, should the focal length of the lens bear to the base of the picture to give approximately t...
-Lenses. Part 3
Diaphragms Modified Diaphragms Some ingenious workers have suggested modifications in the construction of diaphragms, with a view to improving the picture; one of these being a paper diaphragm, made...
-Chapter III. Dark Room And Apparatus
There is no need to despair if there is no dark room, no place to build one, no means to pay for one. Some of our most successful plates were developed in a scullery, and others in the bedroom of a ho...
-Chapter IV. The Studio
For portraiture a studio is a necessity for obtaining the best results. We shall very briefly discuss the question of studios, for we hold that, provided a studio be large enough and light enough, the...
-Studio Furniture
The old, and even modern, portrait painters are answerable for many of the faults to this day committed by photographers, because they take portrait painters as models. Lawrence was especially guilty ...
-Chapter V. Focussing
How To Focalize Having now seen the principles by which we must be governed, and the apparatus required, we will briefly apply them. By focussing we understand, bringing the ground-glass into the pl...
-Rule For Focussing
Example As this loss of outline increases with the greyness produced by atmosphere, it follows that it is greater on grey days and in the distance; and less on bright, sunshiny days. For this reason,...
-Chapter VI. Exposure. Classification Of Exposures
Ways Of Exposing A plate can be exposed in three ways, that is, by removing the cap and replacing it, when the exposure is made; by folding the camera cloth and placing it over the lens (the cap hav...
-Variation Of Exposure
From what has already been said, the student can understand that the exposure will vary with the attendant circumstances. When he considers that there are several factors to be considered in determini...
-On Exposure Tables
We have seen how the rapidity of a lens is determined; beyond, then, the comparing the relative rapidities of lenses, all tables of exposures are fallacious and unscientific. Can absurdity go any furt...
-Study Of Chemistry
Before entering on the subject of development, it is necessary to tell the student that if he does not already understand the principles of chemistry, he should lose no time in doing so, and as aids t...
-Plate-Making, Wet-Plate Process
If the student were to ask ten middle-aged photographers whether they prefer a wet plate or a dry plate negative, nine out of ten would, without doubt answer, Oh, a wet-plate negative. If the studen...
-Hints To Be Remembered In Developing
We venture to state briefly certain hints founded on the chemistry and practice of development, which the student must have at his fingers' ends, for let him remember that the vital question of tone d...
-Plates To Be Developed On Day Of Exposure
Another very important point is the fact that the light does not act on the film proportionately to the length of exposure; the greatest action occurs at the earliest part of the exposure, as can be p...
-Standard Developer
Perhaps the simplest advice we can give as to the particular developer to be used is to take as the normal developer one mixed according to the formula sent out with the plates which the student has c...
-Local Development
Before using, mix forty to sixty drops of A with three ounces of water, and the same quantity of B. We generally use more water than that recommended in the formula. Now it will be remembered that i...
-Study Of Tone
We strongly advise those desirous of doing artistic work to begin by studying tone, expose (always giving two exposures to each subject) on selected subjects, especially fit for the study of tone; for...
-Accidents And Faults
In working with gelatine plates various unavoidable accidents and faults will crop up, some of which can, however, be remedied. Such cases we will now go into. Gives chalky whites and sooty blacks, e...
-Fog
The student will find that for certain effects he may intentionally produce a slight fog over his plate, as has often been done with very good results; but if his plates are unintentionally fogged, th...
-Fog. Continued
Defects Due To Damp All plates should be kept in a dry place, and whilst travelling it is as well to keep them in tinfoil. The effect of damp is to produce patches, which either do not develop at all...
-Ortho-Chromatic Photography
For hand cameras, we should think, film negatives would be very useful, and for small studies such as they produce, would do well; but then such are not pictures. A picture must be perfect in all poin...
-Chapter VIII. Retouching Negatives
Definition Of Retouching Retouching is the process by which a good, bad, or indifferent photograph is converted into a bad drawing or painting. Working Up In Mono-Chrome, Oils, Etc Theoretically, r...
-Retouching Negatives. Continued
Artists On Retouching It is now fifty years since Daguerre publicly announced Niepce's discoveries, and on the scientific and industrial side, photography has results to show nothing short of marvell...
-Chapter IX. Printing
The Process Having his negative, the next thing our student will want to do is to print from it; but before doing so, it will be necessary to decide upon the process he will use. Silver prints. Pla...
-Printing. Continued
Mr. Willis There is, then, in our opinion, for the art student, but one process in which to print, and that is the platinotype process discovered by Mr. Willis. Every photographer who has the good an...
-Hints For Platinotype Printing
Oar printing process, then, is to be platinotype and platinotype only, and as there is no use in swelling this work with facts already published, we advise every student to get full directions from th...
-Vignet-Ting
Whoever introduced the practice of vignetting was no artist, and the dodge was evolved from a misconception of the aims of art, or for commercial purposes. Its origin is obvious, the idea was taken ...
-Combination Printing
The simplest application of this method is the printing of a cloud into a landscape from a different negative. Though it is far preferable to obtain the clouds on the same negative, and this is quite ...
-Cloud Negatives
How to take clouds. To print in clouds. The best way, then, if a cloud negative is wanted, is to take it at the same time as the landscape and from the same point of view, getting as much as possible...
-Chapter X. Enlargements
The best enlargements made for the trade are made from very sharply-focussed negatives. In fact, some of the best enlargers take up the negative from which the enlargement is to be made, and examine i...
-Chapter XI. Transparencies, Lantern And Stereoscopic Slides
Transparencies For industrial and educational purposes transparencies of all kinds are valuable, and we shalltouch upon them elsewhere. With lantern slides our art-student has nothing to do. A lanter...
-Chapter XII. Photo-Mechanical Processes
From our earliest photographic days we always felt that allordinary printing methods, however good in themselves, would finally have to give way to photo-mechanical methods, as all processes are cal...
-Typographic Processes
For the benefit of the student, then, we say there are but two processes to be considered for artistic book illustration - a typographic block to be printed with the text, and an intaglio copperplate....
-Typographic Etching Company's Process
But now the coast is clear, and the student can get his negatives done without visible retouching by asking for it. From an examination of these results it was soon evident that one firm, the Typograp...
-Hints For Those Having Plates Reproduced By Photo-Etching
When sending his plates, then, to be bitten, he should send a well-printed platinotype print with them, a print having just the effect he wishes for in the copper-plate. If clouds are to be introduced...
-Grown And Bitten Plates
For convenience of description the different methods of producing Intaglio plates may be classed under two heads - 'Grown' and 'Bitten,' 'I will first mention the 'grown,' and will endeavour to point...
-Biting Process
A polished copper-plate, preferably a hammered one, is thoroughly cleaned, to remove all traces of grease, and is dusted over with powdered asphalt or resin, and the plate heated until the powder bec...
-Chapter XIII. Mounting And Framing
Having our print, the next question is bow shall it be mounted and framed. There can, of course, be no laws for this, but we feel justified in making a few remarks on this bead. Moun-Tants. Moulding....
-Chapter XIV. Copyright
The hazy notions existing among many photographers as to how to secure the copyright of their photographs, and other details, has led us to make a few remarks on the subject. In the first place the st...
-Chapter XV. Exhibitions
Exhibiting a work of art is publishing it, and the student will, when he obtains suitable works, very naturally begin to think about exhibiting them. The subject of photographic exhibitions is one upo...
-Chapter XVI. Conclusion
We have then finished Book II., and we presume that the student has now mastered his technique and practice, but the end is not yet. The student may thoroughly understand the scientific side of photog...
-Book III. Pictorial Art. Educated Sight
'He does not sufficiently understand that things are of value only-according to their fundamental qualities, and he still believes that the care with which a thing is done, even if it is aimless, ough...
-Book III. Pictorial Art. Educated Sight. Continued
Necessity Of Study Study! You must ever be on the look-out for beauties, that is the necessary mental attitude, otherwise they will never be seen. You must look for a thing if you wish to find it, an...
-Chapter II. Composition
No chapter of this book has given us so much thought as this chapter on composition. Laws Of Composition We could easily, as most writers have done, have given a digest of Mr. Burnet's laws of compo...
-Burnet's "Painting"
A Treatise on Painting, by J. Burnet, F.R.S. Education of the Eye. - Measurement and Form. Omitting to comment on Mr. Burnet's remarks, we put the matter thus, that it is highly desirable for all p...
-Burnet's "Painting". Continued
Now this reads very oddly after talking of rules of composition, for what is the good of a rule if it is not to be followed? and it reads very illegically when compared with the quotation from Reynold...
-Chapter III. Out-Door And In-Door Work
It is presumed the student has thoroughly mastered and applied all that has preceded this chapter, especially the matter of-tone, otherwise it is no use attempting to make pictures, which means attemp...
-Group Photography
Treatment Of Model Groups are very difficult to treat artistically, and our never-failing rule is to limit as much as possible the number of people in the group. Having now chosen his model and arran...
-Landscape
The student who would become a landscape photographer must go to the country and live there for long periods; for in no other way can he get any insight into the mystery of nature. All nature near tow...
-Photographic Haunts
Again let the student avoid imitation. If he knows that an artist has been successful in one place, do not let him, like a feeble imitator, be led thither also, for the chances are, if his predecessor...
-Composition Of Outdoor Photography
The objects must be arranged so that the thing expressed is told clearly and directly, in short, the student should try to express his subject as it has never been expressed before. All things not con...
-Subject Of The Picture
The subject must have pictorial qualities, it must be typical, and must give aesthetic pleasure. The student must look for elegance and a distingue air in his subject. You will find that the best pict...
-Studio Portraiture
The easiest branch of photography is portraiture in the studio, for all conditions, including even the dress of the model, are in the photographer's hands. The lighting is also perfectly under control...
-Chapter IV. Hints On Art
Practical Hints As practical hints for working cannot be woven into a continuous text, we will give them separately. Prizes For Set Subjects Never compete for prizes for set subjects for work o...
-Hints On Art. Continued
Good Art Good art only appeals to the highly cultivated at the first glance, but it gradually grows on the uncultivated, or the half cultivated; with bad art the case is otherwise. Life Of The Mod...
-Chapter V. Decorative Art
Decorative Art By the term decorative, we mean the ornamentation of anything constructed for some useful or special purpose as opposed to the ornamentation whose object is to please per se. Thus, t...
-Decorative Art Principles
Now the photographer, who studies and hopes to excel at decorative photography, must remember that he must work on the same general principles as he does in producing pictures, that is, he must pay at...
-Decorative Art Principles. Continued
Wallpapers And Hangings We do not know whether or not photography has bean applied to the manufacture of either of these materials, but there is wide scope for it. It must be remembered, however, tha...
-Decorative Arts and Their Limitations
We will now briefly enumerate these arts with their limitations Lead Pencil Lead Pencil. - The scale between the white and black is very limited, for, as any one who has drawn with lead pencil will ...
-Decorative Arts and Their Limitations. Part 2
Wood Engraving Wood engraving. - In wood cutting the parts left uncut print dark, and those that are hollowed out or cut away do not print at all; thus, the white is cut out from a dark ground. The w...
-Decorative Arts and Their Limitations. Part 3
Charcoal Charcoal. - With this method the scale is limited as the black is not so deep as many other blacks used in the arts, but by its means delicate tonality can be obtained, but not the most deli...
-Adam Salomon's Portraits
M. Adam Salomon, a sculptor of ability, a Chevalier of the Legion of Honour, took the photographic world by storm, by his portraits exhibited at the Paris Exhibition of 1867, and he continued, to prac...
-Adam Salomon's Portraits. Continued
What great artists elsewhere have thought of photography is shown by the following extract from one of J. F. Millet's letters to his friend Feuardent. After asking Feuardent to bring him some photogra...
-Answers To Other Criticisms
Following in Mr. Hamerton's steps other critics have raised their objections to photography, and these we shall discuss briefly. A photograph, it has been said, shows the art of nature rather than...
-Answers To Other Criticisms. Continued
It has been said, The camera sees far more than the eye takes in at any given moment, and sees it with an impartiality for which there is no parallel in the human vision. This objection has been ans...
-Appendix. Books On Art and Photography
Very few poets get their inspiration from nature. The majority of them have read other poets, and they use the same ideas, clothed in different language. The painter has to go directly to nature, or ...
-Appendix II. Science And Art
(A Paper read at the Camera Club Conference, held in the rooms of the Society of Arts, London, on March 26th, 1889.) Mr. President, Ladies, and Fellow-Photographers, - Before beginning this paper I w...
-Science And Art. Part 2
Now let us turn to Art, and look at our imaginary man from the artistic standpoint. Assuming that we have learned the technique of some method of artistic expression, and that is part of the science w...
-Science And Art. Part 3
II We shall now endeavour to discuss briefly how our remarks apply to photography. Any student of photographic literature is well aware that numerous papers are constantly being published by persons ...
-Science And Art. Part 4
III Next I shall discuss briefly the ill-effects of a too sedulous study of Science upon an Art student. The first and, perhaps, the greatest of these ill-effects is the 'positive mental attitude th...
-Life And Landscape On The Norfolk Broads
By P. H. Emerson, B.A., M.B. (Cantab.), and T. P. Goodall. Illustrated with Forty Plates from Nature, mounted on plate paper, size 17 x 12 inches. Edition de luxe, limited to 100 copies, bound in vel...
-Pictures From Life In Field And Fen
By P. H. Emerson, B.A., M.B. (Cantab.). Being Twenty Plates in Photogravure reproduced from Dr. Emerson's Original Negatives by Messrs. Dawson & Co., Boussod, Valadon & Co., Walker & Boutall. and the...
-Idyls Of The Norfolk Broads
A Series of Twelve Plates, depicting Pastoral Life in East Anglia, reproduced in Autogravure from Original Negatives, with accompanying descriptive Notes, by the Author, P. H. Emerson, B.A., M.B. (Can...
-Pictures Of East Anglian Life
Illustrated with Thirty-two Photogravures and Fifteen smaller Illustrations. The text, divided into twenty-six chapters, treats of the East Anglian peasantry, and is full of interesting information of...
-Pictures Of East Anglian Life. Continued
News Mr. P. H. Emerson has produced a really valuable book. His text, descriptive of the life, superstitions, and character of Suffolk peasantry and fisherfolk, their stories of the land and stories...
-Opinions Of The Photographic Press
Naturalistic Photography For Students Of The Art. By Dr. P. H. Emerson. Crown 8vo. Cloth, 5s. Second Edition, revised. In the work just issued, that the author endeavours himself to look directly a...









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