The first description ever given, so far as we know, of this particular style of lighting was by Charlie Hetherington. We have for that reason given it his name. Some operators, however, call it "whole shadow" lighting. Its effects are very striking, the profile being clear cut against the background. Like our previous lighting (Sarony), it is better made in profile only, and if any difference the profile must be more exact than for a Sarony lighting. This style lighting we think especially good for light draperies. Like Rembrandt and Sarony lightings, it is mostly back light, therefore the draperies are thrown in shadow, thus bringing out good definition. By a glance at our illustration we think you will understand our meaning.

To make this lighting, place your sitter directly under the center' of your light. The background, as in all previous lightings, not less than three feet from your sitter. More would be better. Draw all the curtains on your side light, except the one farthest in the rear of your sitter, all the way to your top light. Draw this curtain to within about two or three feet of the top. Draw your top curtains down to about three feet. Place the camera about nine feet from the side light. Now turn the body of your sitter at right angles to your side light, turning the face away until you secure a full profile. Take your head screen of brown material and screen the head from the top light, allowing only the side light to strike your sitter. If you have made the lighting according to directions, you will notice the highest light to be on the back of the neck and hair and top of the ear. The entire face, however, will be in a soft shadow, in which there is plenty of detail to bring out roundness. Notice how beautifully the lights and shades fall on the hair. It may be that you will sometimes have a light on the cheek just under the ear. This should not be, and can be obviated by turning the sitter further away from the light, of course moving your camera away from the light until you bring it in line with the profile. If you use a side reflector in this lighting, let it be of a drab colored cloth, so that you will have the front of the face entirely free from any, harsh reflected light. Some-times the paper on the walls of your operating room will very much interfere with your making this lighting. If it does, use a side screen of black goods in the place of your side reflector. The background plays a very important part in this style lighting. One of too dark a tone will not give enough relief to the face, while one of too light a tone will have a tendency to give a silhouette appearance to the picture, the profile seeming as though it were cut with a knife. You can control the tone of your ground in a large measure by the manner in which you place it under the light. The more towards your side light you turn it the lighter shade you get. The further away, of course, the darker it becomes.

An Example of Hetherington or Whole Shadow Lighting.

An Example of Hetherington or Whole Shadow Lighting.