348. In some localities the photographer is blessed with very little sun-

347. A salting solution for cartoon paper may be made as follows:

Boiled Milk,...........................

1 pint.

Glacial Acetic Acid,...........................

10 drops.

Albumen from two large eggs.

Bromide of Potassium,...........................

80 grains.

iodide of Potassium,...........................

160 "

Mix thoroughly, and filter. The albumen should be well cut before adding it to the milk. Float or swab the paper with the salting for two minutes. The sensitizing solution is, viz.:

Water,......................................................

1 ounce.

Nitrate of Silver,...........................

40 grains.

Swab this on evenly for two minutes. Develop with

Water,...........................

8 ounces.

Pyrogallic Acid,...........................

2 heaping teaspoonfuls.

glacial Acetic Acid,...........................

1 ounce.

Bromide of Potassium,...........................

4 grains

Fix with

Water, ...........................

10 ounces.

Hyposulphite of Soda,...........................

4 "

George W. Wallace.

To prepare canvas for solar printing, get a piece of prepared canvas, such as painters generally use; rub the little knots of paint down with fine emery and alcohol; then rub with alcohol until the paint is almost off. The rubbing must be done in circles, commencing in he centre of the canvas. Care must be taken not to rub too much, thereby showing the bare canvas. After rubbing, wash the canvas well with water. Mix kaolin with alcohol, to paste; lay a good, even coating of the mixture on the canvas, and let it dry hard, so that when the stretcher is shaken the kaolin falls off in scales; now wash well with water, and salt with any of the usual salting solutions. After the picture is printed, toned, and fixed, give the canvas a coat of megilp, It is now ready for the painter. Some use gelatin for the last coating, but megilp takes the paint much better, and is in no danger of peeling off. - Leon Vidal.

848. Printing by development in the solar camera is practised in all cases by some solar winters, but I do not think as good results are obtained in that way as by the other process, There are times, however, when the negative is so very intense that one can hardly spare a whole day, especially in winter, to make a print from it. In such cases we have to do the text best thing, and resort to printing by development. The operation is the same in principle so that of producing collodion pictures by the means of a developer, or, more properly, a reducer, and the same ingredients, pretty much, are to be used in its practice. I prefer to shine of the quality needed for solar printing. He must then have resort to the "development" process, which consists in printing the image but partially, and then developing it to the full strength by after manipulasalt my own paper, and use only a chloride, without the addition of either a bromide, iodide, or nitrate of uranium, as some use. For a salting solution use

Chloride of Sodium,...........................

100 grains.

Hydrochloric Acid,...........................

6 drops.

Distilled Water,...........................

12 ounces.

Immerse two to three minutes and dry. Sensitize with

Nitrate of Silver,...........................

1 ounce

Citric Acid,...........................

8 grains

Distilled Water,...........................

8 ounces

Float about three minutes and hang up to dry. Blot off all the superfluous fluid from the corners and lower edge. The paper may be used before it is decidedly dry, if you wish, and should be exposed until a faint image appears. In direct sunlight I expose from three to four seconds; on a cloudy day, or in diffused light, about a minute must be given.

For the development provide a large porcelain dish, larger than your sheet of paper, and a sheet of clean glass, somewhat smaller than the print. Withdraw the print from the camera, being careful to keep it from the light, and lay it upon the glass face up. Fold down the paper at each side, beneath the glass, and place paper and glass together on the left side of your dish. Now take of the following developer -

Water,...........................

6 ounces

Pyrogallic acid,...........................

12 grains.

Citric Acid,...........................

6 "

enough to cover the paper. Incline the dish downwards, to the right, and pour in the solution; then, raising the right side, cause the fluid to flow over the whole surface of the print, taking care to have it flow evenly. Lest markings and lines occur, let no stoppage take place. The development begins at once and proceeds as rapidly as in the case of a negative, and too much care cannot be given it. When the print appears sufficiently vigorous, stop the development, pour" off the solution, and wash thoroughly. Fix until the whites are perfectly clear, which will sometimes take ten minutes and sometimes thirty. After fixing, the prints must be very thoroughly washed. They may be toned in the ordinary toning - bath. Tone in rather a weak solution, otherwise the strength of the prints will be reduced. Like in everything else, practice is needed to make one perfect. - Young Chloride. This formula to prepare paper is among the oldest published:

Skimmed Milk,...........................

1/2 gallon.

Acetic Acid,No.8............................

3 ounces.

Stir, and put it in a porcelain dish; bring to a boil, stirring all the time; strain out the curd through muslin (make Dutch cheese of this); take the serum, when cold, filter until clear.

Now add

Iodide of Potassium,...........................

16 grains.

Bromide of Potassium,...........................

4 "

to each ounce of the clear serum. Float your plain paper on this until it lays smooth; see that no bubbles or spots rest on the paper; dry with moderate heat; prepare the paper in a tions. Some parties prefer the results obtained in this way. As a rule, they are not so soft and delicate, and they should be made on stronger paper, because of the handling they must undergo, and because they must be passed through various solutions and washing. This method has a great advantage when the sunshine is scarce, on account of the very short ex-posure required by it. When the prints are to be worked up by the brush or pencil, they answer quite as well as those made by the other method.

room free from dust or actinic light, and if kept in a cool, dry atmosphere, it will keep in good working order a long time. To use, float two minutes on a solution of

Silver,...........................

640 grains.

Water,...........................

16 ounces

Acetic Acid,...........................

2 "

Draw- the sheet off the silver solution over a glass rod. Having previously focussed your picture, place your paper, while damp, in position, and let on the light; print according to the density of the negative. A very hard negative requires printing until the detail is well out, and developed with a very weak developer; on the contrary, a very thin negative need not show any detail, and must have a stronger developer, which is prepared as follows: