Toning - bath for purple or black tone: Water, one quart; gold, three grains; sal soda, saturated solution, a few drops. Print deep and tone to the color you wish. For a brown tone, take one quart of water, one or more grains of gold, and one drachm of acetate of soda; let stand one hour; then add enough bicarbonate of soda to make the bath slightly alkaline. When the lights begin to look a delicate lilac, the shadows still red, take out the print - C. A. Zimmerman.

250. The sulphocyanide bath will give, with ease, any tones, from the rich brown color only just removed from the foxy tone of a fixed untoned picture to a tine purple or pure black with a tinge of pink in the half - tones. In passing from the former of these to the latter, the print assumes many very pleasing colors, any of which may be retained by stopping the further progress of the solution at that point, as the hypo, fixing-bath seems to have no perceptible reducing effect upon the imago when toned with sulphocyanide.

All the photographic papers I have used have given me successful results with this bath, and I have had no repetition of the strange and perplexing failure with which my first attempts were greeted. The prints, if required for the very deepest tone the bath can give, must not various neutralizing ingredients, among which are sulphocyanide of ammonium, tungstate of soda, and carbonate of soda mixed with the acetate. It is but fair that the advocates of these modifications should be heard, and they are given the opportunity in the notes hereto.

be at all over - printed; if, however, the paler tones are sought for, a very slight amount of over-printing may be given. This alone is, in dark weather, a great advantage, as so many more copies can be secured from each negative in the course of a day. I have produced twelve prints with one negative in about an hour in sunshine, at this late season of the year, all of them printed deeply enough for successful toning. This is a point worth consideration. The prints should be well washed before toning, that is, until all the free silver is removed. The toning - bath which has suited my purposes best has been made as follows:

Gold,.......................

1 grain.

Sulphocyanide of Ammonium,...............

20 grains

Water.......................

2 grains.

I have noticed that more gold is used in this than in ordinary toning processes. The image is first reduced, on immersion, to a foxy tone, and then it becomes strengthened by degrees to a series of colors, rich, warm, and brilliant, ending in black. It seems to me that all of them are formed by the constant addition of gold to the print; it is, as it were, intensified with gold. This, of course, involves a considerable expenditure of the precious metal, about two grains or more per sheet being used; but if, as I think, this gold is precipitated in a manner which leaves the print free from sulphur, it seems to me that it goes to render the picture more permanent, and if this should be found so in practice, the extra expenditure of gold will not be so much objected to.

I find heat a great accelerator of the process, making the toning as rapid as any other method, with perhaps only one or two exceptions. The bath can be used over and over again, fresh gold being added as in the case of the acetate bath. A very strong solution of hypo may be used for fixing without any risk of spoiling or reducing the tone. - Nelson K. Cherrill.

All difficulties can be avoided by the use of the tungstate of soda bath. As it is used almost immediately after mixing, the gold does not precipitate; and if there be not sufficient gold in the bath, more can be added during the process of toning without danger of mealiness. I should recommend those who are successful with the acetate bath by all means to continue its use, but to those who find disappointment in its working I say, " Give it up, and try tungstate." The tungstate bath is very similar to the carbonate, but, whereas I have found the latter produce mealy prints, I have never in a single instance found tungstate a failure. The following is the formula:

Tungstate of Soda,.......................

20 grains.

Chloride of Gold,......

1 grain.

Boiling Water,.......................

6 or 8 ounces.

Use it as soon as it has cooled, ana after the first batch of prints are toned pour it into a bottle and keep it as the stock solution, and it can always be used without being again warmed, merely adding sufficient gold for the day's toning a few minutes before required for use, and with each grain of gold a grain or two of tungstate of soda. This bath will become purple in color, but that does not signify, and it can (by following the above method)

260. The chloride of gold sold by the dealers is of such excellent and uniform quality, that, it is of advantage to the photographer to make it himself. The operation is rather an unpleasant one, but it is simple enough. It should always be done in the open air, in order to avoid the fumes, which are poison to the lungs. It is prepared by dis-solving gold metal in aqua regia.

Nitric acid, C.P.,.......................

2 parts

Hydrochloric Acid, C.P.,.......................

3 ,,

To, say, five gold dollars, to be added one by one. A gentle heat should be used over and over again indefinitely, and will answer well either for ordinary sensitized or for ready-sensitized paper. - Charles Durand.

I have triad nearly all the toning-baths I have seen published, but with the same result-that is, refusing to tone satisfactorily a great number of prints. No addition of gold would restore them to their primary working order; but the following I have found effective and always the same. I have used it for two years with perfect success. I have toned with it as many as five hundred cartes at once, besides nearly half that amount of 9 x 7, and other sizes. It ended as it began, with the same uniform speed and quality of tone. It is also very quick. You can get any variety of tone from warm chocolate to black and white. Take

Gold,..............................................

1 grain.

Acetate of Soda,..............................................

24 grains

Carbonate of Soda,..............................................

4 grains

Water (warm),..............................................

8 ounces.

let it stand for about two days before using. When it requires strengthening, to each grain 4>f gold add twenty-four grains acetate of soda to the bath before using. If it requires a fresh supply before all the prints are toned, add more gold (neutralized). It will tone as long as there are prints to tone. It will tone more prints and better than any I have ever had. I mixed up a bath at the commencement of the year, and I used the same for twelve months, and after toning many thousands of prints it was as good as ever. The first supply of carbonate is sufficient. - William Ferguson.