I prefer the " lime" or oxyhydrogen light for the lime, as it is of a fixed quantity; it soon pays for itself in preventing loss from under- or over-exposure. You have only to find the right time once and then go on forever, making only a little difference according to the density of the negative; whereas, if you use the solar light, the exposure may vary frcm a few seconds to any number of minutes. I use the mixed jet and keep the gases in galvanized iron tanks, in which the gas never goes bad. It is a pleasure to be able to make an enlargement at a few minutes' notice with certainty - night or day, of course, not making any difference. About one minute and a half a exposure in the lantern will be found sufficient, using the following developer:

Pyrogallic Acid,..................

40grains.

Citric Acid,..................

20 "

Acetic Acid,..................

30 minims.

Alcohol..................

quant, stiff.

Water,..................

10 ounces.

One and a half ounces will cover a twelve by ten plate. As soon as the plate is well covered, pour off the excess, and begin to wash as soon as the image appears as you would like to see it when finished. Fix in a dish of hypo, wash well, and proceed to make another if you require it. - A. Philburn.

366. After the film is transferred to the paper, mounted upon stout card and rolled well, shake fine pumice-powder, sifted through two thicknesses of fine muslin, all over it, and with a light circular motion rub evenly all over till an even mat surface is obtained; wipe off all pumice-powder with a clean, soft linen rag. Now take one of Rowney's ever-pointed pencils, H, HB, and BB. With the BB strengthen all the dark touches - pupils of the eyes, line of eyelash, eyebrows, hair and drapery, etc; with the H and HB mend all the patches in the face, and graduate all the shadows, working between the breaks in the photograph. If the operator cannot draw, it is best left at this; if he can, any amount of finish can be obtained - the whole face can be highly stippled with the pencil, the drapery hatched, and some bold hatching over the shoulders and upon the background will greatly add to the effect; but it is astonishing how much effect can be obtained upon a good, soft transfer with just the few bold firm touches with the BB, and the mending with the H and HB pencil. - George Croughton.