Study No. 16. Portrait by C. J. Van Deventer, Decatur, I11. This picture was made in an operating-room, 20 x 30 feet; style of light used, top and side; size of light, 18 x 18 feet. The light was used wide open in making this exposure; the time of day was 10:30 a. m. The lens used was a No. 9 Collinear, Series No. 2; focal length, 20 inches; stop used, F. 16; exposure given, 8 seconds; plate used, Seed 27 Gilt-Edge, developed in Pyro. After development, the hands were locally reduced; printing process, red chalk Carbon and mounted on a combination mount - the first sheet cream linen and the second deep sepia. (See Page 133.)

Study No. 17. Portrait by W. M. Hollinger, New York. This picture was made in an operating-room 25 x 28 feet; style of light used, side and top; size of light, 12 x 18 feet; light used wide open without curtains; lens used, Bausch & Lomb Unar; plates used, regular ordinary plate and developed with Pyro. Absolutely no after manipulation of the plate; print made on Sepia Platinum. (See Page 151.)

Study No. 19. "Portrait of Dr. Samuel T. Chew," by Meredith Janvier, Baltimore, Md. The picture was made in a resident studio; size of room, 16 x 20, ordinary private home library; style of light, side window; size of light, ordinary window about 30 inches wide; the light was used wide open; lens used, Rapid Rectilinear; plate used, Seed 27 Gilt-Edge, developed in plain Pyro. There was no after manipulation of any kind. (See Page 164.)

Study No. 21. Portrait by W. M. Morrison, Chicago, Ill. The picture was made in an operating-room, 25 x 40 feet; style of light used, single-slant; size of light, 16 x 20 feet; light used wide open; lens used, 3-A Dallmeyer. Regular plates were used and developed with Pyro; printing process, double mounted Platino. (See Page 176.)

Study No. 22. Portrait by Mrs. W. W. Pearce, Muskegon, I11. Title, " The Young Professor." This picture was made with Bausch & Lomb Rapid Rectilinear lens; stop used, full opening; plate used, Ilford; exposure given, one-fifth second in a studio; developed in Pyro and enlargement was made on Bromide. (See Page 223.)

Study No. 23. Portrait by A. L. Bowersox, Dayton, Ohio. The picture was made in an operating-room 24 x 42 feet; style of light used, single-slant 30 degrees; size of light 14 x 16 feet. Open light used with side screens to reduce the strong light on the shoulders and ear. The lens used was a No. 3 Deardorff; focal length, 15 inches with no stop; exposure given, 1 second; plate used, Cramer Banner, developed with Pyro-Acetone. The plate was not reduced nor intensified except such treatment as the Beck process requires. This negative was made with a plain black background and the glass side of the negative was ground-glassed and the background design worked upon this surface. Every photographer utilizing this method of work can introduce as much individuality into his work as any painter in his portraits painted with the brush and paints. This portrait was printed on Angelo Sepia Platinum paper. (See Page 254.)

Study No. 24. Portrait by Curtis Bell, New York, N. Y. This picture was made in an operating-room 28 feet by 30 feet; style of light, high single-slant, mostly top light; size of light, 15 x 25 feet. An open light was used, but cut off by screen with head and side shades. Lens used, Portrait Unar; ordinary single coated plate was used and developed with Ortol. There was no after manipulation of the negative, but printing-frame was tissued to print up high-lights. The print was made on Sepia Platinum paper mounted on sepia mounts. (See Page 284.)

Study No. 25. Portrait by F. Milton Somers, Cincinnati, O. This picture was made in an operating-room 20 x 40 feet; style of light used, ordinary window with lower half closed; lens used, Dallmeyer 4-B; plate used, Standard single coated, developed in Pyro with no after manipulation. This negative was made by the window at a distance of about 8 feet. The lower half of window was closed with curtains. The background was black and worked in on the back of the negative. The exposure given was about 1 second; the print was made on Sepia Platinum. (See Page 290.)

Study No. 26. "The Angel of the Darker Drink," by Miss Katherine Bingham, St. Johnsbury, Vt. This picture was made in the home; the lens used was a Goerz, Series 3-B; stop used, U. S. 4; plate used, Seed 27; exposure given, 10 seconds; developer, Pyro-Acetone. There was no after treatment of the plate, neither reducing nor intensifying. The print was made en Willis & Clements CC Platinum paper, mounted on salmon colored mount. (See Page 311.)

Study No. 27. Portrait by George Graham Holloway, Terre Haute, Ind. This picture was made in an operating-room 16 x 30 feet with a north light facing a large brick building; size of light, 12x15 feet, yet light was used wide open and was controlled with black screens; lens used was a Collinear; plate used, regular Cramer Banner, developed in Pyro. There was no altering or after manipulation of the negative. The print was mounted on a combination mount, the first mount being medium sepia and the final mounting being dark sepia. The print was toned sepia. (See Page 334.)

Study No. 28. Portrait by Carl Semon, Cleveland, O. Title, "In a Garden Hat." The exposure was made at 10 a. M., weather fair; lens used was a Voightlander

Heliar; focal length, 12 inches; stop used, F. 5; exposure, 20 seconds; plate used, Seed 26x, developed in Pyro. The diffusion was obtained by working away from the light. There was no after manipulation of the negative. Printing process, Platinum. (See Page 339.)

Study No. 29. Portrait by Charles C. Kough, Greens-burg, Pa. The negative was made in September at about 3 p. m. The exposure given was 3 seconds on a Seed 26x plate. The style of light is an old style top and side light - side 10 x 6 feet, top 10 x 12 feet. Light controlled with a set of opaque window blinds. Direct light also used, never diffused, the direct rays giving more roundness, better modeling and more sparkle to the negative than diffused light. The lens was a Morrison Rapid Rectilinear. Stop F. 8. Pyro developer, plate treated locally in development, by rinsing the plate just after the image began to show, applying the developer with the tip of finger to the face to build it up ahead of the drapery just enough; then, immersing the entire plate in the developer until it developed to the strength required. The slight effect of foliage in the background of this picture was worked on the back of the plate with Prussian blue on the end of a match. The print is on Angelo Sepia paper. (See Page 346.)