669. Making Prints On Enamel Bromide

Making Prints On Enamel Bromide. Prints that are made on Enamel Bromide are liable to have fine black lines on them, commonly called hair-lines. These are abrasion marks and are caused by silver coming to the surface of the paper either when packing or shipping, or by something heavy being placed on it which jars the silver to the surface. These lines can be removed very easily, when the print is dry, by moistening (not wetting) a piece of absorbent cotton with wood alcohol and rubbing over the black lines.

670. Non-Poisonous Developer

Non-Poisonous Developer. For those who desire to use a non-poisonous developer we would advise substituting Ortol, in like proportions, for Metol.

671. The following Amidol Developer will also produce brilliant prints:

Stock Solution

Water......................................

12

ozs.

Sulphite of soda, Crystals .............................

3

ozs.

Amidol..........................................

1/2

oz.

672. For the amateur or photographer who intends making only a few prints at a time we would advise making up only half the quantity of this stock solution. To develop use:

Stock Solution ............................

1 1/2,

ozs.

Bromide of Potassium, 10 % Sol .........................

8

drops.

Water.......................................

6

ozs.

673. Washing Prints

Washing Prints. Prints should be thoroughly washed for at least half an hour after fixing. If this is conscientiously done there is no reason why they should not be permanent. Even though you wash your prints in running water, pick them over occasionally so as to keep them separated and make it possible for the water to flow between the prints.

674. Temperature

Temperature. Have the temperature of your baths and wash waters as near alike as possible, being guided by the temperature of the water in which you are going to wash them.

675. Vignetting

Vignetting. Very pretty and soft vignettes can be produced by the following simple instructions: Cut a hole in a piece of cardboard or strawboard the shape you want the vignette to appear (pear shape is best). The cardboard should be a little larger than your enlargement. Hold the cardboard in your hand and stand to one side of, and facing, the easel, and place this cardboard between the lens and the easel to which the paper is tacked. Uncap the lens and hold the vignetter (the cardboard with the hole in it) between the lens and easel, so as to cut off or vignette away the portion that you do not want. The vignetter must be kept moving slightly back and forth between the lens and easel, and far enough from the lens to admit light only to the portions you want. Vignette and block out the light from the parts you do not desire. Continue this to and fro movement through the entire exposure, which should not be less than 20 to 30 seconds, the lens being stopped down, if necessary, to give you sufficient time to operate the vignetter.

676. To produce a soft, even, brilliant vignette requires some little practice, but the "knack" once acquired it becomes quite easy. Should you hold the cardboard steady without moving it you would produce a sharp outline. By moving or shaking it slightly you soften the blend. It would be advisable to first practice manipulating the vig-netter with the image projected on the screen before attaching the sensitive paper thereto. This will give you an idea of what is required before making the exposure.