557. Note

Note. Detailed instruction on Bromide Enlarging is given in Volume V. This elementary instruction is intended only for those who do not have access to a room that can be arranged specially for enlarging, and for those who desire to make enlargements with little effort, thus familiarizing themselves with the process before taking up the work seriously.

558. Beginners having small cameras, employing small size plates or films, frequently obtain negatives of special artistic merit, the results from which would be very much improved if they were enlarged to about two or three times their size. This can be done very easily, and with very little expense. The enlarging of the negative itself requires some experience, and, perhaps, a larger camera than you possess, but enlarged prints on bromide or gaslight paper may be made from even the smallest Brownie film.

559. Bromide paper is a paper sensitized with an emulsion similar to that on the ordinary dry plate or film, only of much less rapidity, permitting of manipulation by a stronger light than would be safe for plates. A clear understanding of the process will be afforded if the beginner will consider the sheet of bromide paper as being practically a slow dry plate. Also bear in mind that a positive image is produced by photographing through the negative onto the sheet of bromide paper, with the negative and sheet of paper some distance apart instead of in contact as is necessary when making an ordinary print.

560. This process requires some means of arranging the negative, lens and bromide paper, so that the light will travel through the negative and, by means of the lens, the image on the negative be reflected upon the sensitized paper. The space between the negative and sensitized paper must be enclosed and made absolutely light-tight, so that no light will reach the paper except that which travels through the negative and lens.

561. A simple contrivance suitable for bromide enlarging by daylight is made by the Eastman Kodak Company, and is known as the Brownie Enlarging camera. In it enlargements can be made up to 5x7 inches in size. This camera, as will be seen by Illustration No. 60, is nothing more than a collapsible box, made wedge shape, with an attachment on the small end to receive the film or glass negative, while the wide end is fitted with a paper-holder. About 6 inches from the small end are arranged grooves for the receiving of the lens board and holding the lens in proper position. (See Illustration No. 61.) With the lens in place the cone is closed with small flaps on the outside, as shown in Illustration No. 60.

562. In Illustration No. 62 is presented the Ingento Daylight Enlarger No. 1, which is a solid box made of hard wood. Like the Brownie it requires no adjustment, as it is a fixed focus, requiring only the placing of the negative and paper in the camera and exposing to the light. The Ingento Enlarger is fitted with an achromatic lens and sliding shutter, and will make 8x10 prints from 4x5 negatives, and 6 1/2 x 8 1/2 prints from 3 1/4x4 1/4 negatives.

Ill. No. 60.Closed.

Ill. No. 60. Closed.

See Par. 561.

Eastman Brownie Enlarging Camera.

Eastman Brownie Enlarging Camera.

Illustration No. 61. Sectional View.

See Par. 561.

Illustration No. 62. Ingento Daylight Enlarger No. 1.

Illustration No. 62. Ingento Daylight Enlarger No. 1.

See Paragraph 562.

Illustration No. 63. Ingento Folding Daylight Enlarger No. 2.

Illustration No. 63. Ingento Folding Daylight Enlarger No. 2.

See Paragraph 563.

Illustration No. 64. No. 1 Eastman Kodak

Illustration No. 64. No. 1 Eastman Kodak.

Enlarging Camera.

See Paragraph 564.

563. A more compact instrument will be found in the Ingento Folding Daylight Enlarger No. 2. The No. 2 en-larger works on precisely the same plan as the No. 1, but is so constructed that it can be folded up into a compact space when not in use. It is also more convenient for loading, being supplied with a plate holder for holding the paper, so that it is unnecessary to take the complete camera into the dark-room (as is required with the enlargers formerly mentioned). The holder can also accommodate glass plates, should it be desired to make large positives or negatives. (See Illustration No. 63.)

564. A more advanced adjustable focus folding enlarging camera will be found in the No. 1 Kodak enlarging camera (See Illustration No. 64). This camera is fitted with a good lens and different size stops and shutter; also has ground-glass for focusing, and is suitable for pictures 6 1/2x8 1/2. The front of the camera is fitted with kits, to receive negatives any size up to 4 x 5 inches. Another feature of this camera is that by detaching the front section the camera can be used as a portrait camera - all that you will require is an additional lens for this purpose.