1246. Remedy

Remedy. Lower or raise the temperature of the iron and apply it again. Full directions for use accompany both the mounting apparatus and the tissue.

1247. If you desire to go to the trouble of making

Illustration No. 34 Artistic Folders See Paragraph No. 1242

Illustration No. 34 Artistic Folders See Paragraph No. 1242.

Illustration No. 35 Dry Mounting Press See Paragraph No. 1243

Illustration No. 35 Dry Mounting Press See Paragraph No. 1243.

Illustration No. 36 Dry Mounting with Hot Iron

Illustration No. 36 Dry Mounting with Hot Iron.

See Paragraph No. 1243 your own dry mounting tissue, the following formula should be prepared:

Gum Sandarac..........................

10 parts

Copal...........................

3 parts

Orange Shellac.................................

4 parts

Resin................................

3 parts

Venice Turpentine................................

2 parts

Alcohol...............................

11 parts

Spirits of Turpentine...................................

11 parts

1248. A thin sheet of tissue paper should be thoroughly saturated with this solution, and having previously waxed a sheet of glass, lay the tissue paper on and again freely apply the above mixture. Allow it to dry and then strip from the glass. The paper thus treated may then be cut to the size of the print, laid between the print and mount and ironed with a hot iron.

1249. Pointers

Pointers. Never allow the surface of bromide, or gelatin printing-out paper prints to come in contact with anything while drying, as the gelatin is apt to stick.

1250. If it is necessary to dry prints quickly, soak them in two or three changes of wood alcohol. They will then dry rapidly in a warm place.

1251. To ascertain whether a large print is squarely trimmed, bend one edge over so that the two corners meet with the two opposite corners. If the trimming is true they should coincide.

1252. A strong solution of shellac in methylated, or rectified, spirit thinly applied to both mount and print, the two surfaces being rubbed into contact, will mount prints on the thinnest support without cockling.

1253. In multiple mounting never use more than two or three tints, and always try for harmony of color, avoiding great contrasts. Remember, the print is the feature to display, not the mount. Therefore, while it is a good plan to employ liberal margin, do not overdo it to the extent of having much mount and little picture.