Materials have improved wonderfully in speed and color-sensitiveness in late years and it has been necessary to improve darkroom lighting conditions to maintain the necessary balance of safety in handling these improved materials.

If you have been troubled with fog in any form it may be due to the fact that you have not increased the safety of your darkroom illumination in proportion to the general increased sensitiveness of materials.

Why not make a test and be sure about this matter? Even a slight loss in quality should be corrected if you would maintain your reputation for fine work.

Load a holder with two films or plates placing one in the holder by the light you are accustomed to use and marking this side of the holder No. 1. Now load the opposite side of the holder in absolute darkness and mark this No, 2.

Make two test negatives and develop No. 1 in the usual way but develop No. 2 in total darkness or in a covered dish. Time the development and do not allow any light to reach negative No. 2 until it is fixed. This test should prove conclusively that your light is unsafe if No. 1 negative shows fog and No. 2 does not.

If your darkroom light is a home-made affair it can still be safe if you use a Wratten Safe-light. These Safelights are made of glass coated with colored gelatine and the colors are combined and adjusted in the spectroscope and by trial with the materials for which they are recommended so that they insure a definite degree of safety.

The Series 2 Safelight is the one most generally used for developing as it is safe for extra fast and orthochromatic films and plates which are sensitive to yellow and green but not to red.

With your darkroom lamp three feet from your developing tank or tray the Series 2 Safelight is safe for ordinary developing. The degree of safety is based on the exposure of a dry film or plate for one-half minute at three feet from the light. When the film or plate is in the developer there is ample safety for the length of time necessary for development. But do not hold the negative to the light for examination until development is nearly completed.

Much of the fog one sees in negatives is caused by holding the film or plate close to the light be-fore an image has begun to appear. This is a matter of habit and as it is a dangerous habit it should be omitted for the sake of good results.

Are Your Negatives As Brilliant As They Should Be StudioLightMagazine1923 251

PORTRAIT FILM NEGATIVE. VITAVA PRINT

By The Green-Crane Studio Kansas City, Mo.

Are Your Negatives As Brilliant As They Should Be StudioLightMagazine1923 253

PORTRAIT FILM NEGATIVE. VITAVA PRINT

By The Green-Crane Studio Kansas City, Mo.

Portraits for Christmas

Your friends can buy anything you can give them - except your photograph. Phone your photographer now.

There's a photographer in your town Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, N.Y.

The advertisement shown above will appear as a full page in the Saturday Evening Post of Nov. 17th and the Women's Home Companion for December which is on the news stands November 20th. The combined circulation of these two magazines is over four million. And this advertising will bring you business.

Are Your Negatives As Brilliant As They Should Be StudioLightMagazine1923 255

PORTRAIT FILM NEGATIVE. VITAVA PRINT

By The Green-Crane Studio Kansas City, Mo.