If it is desired to get a fine and even enamelled surface the prints are squeegeed on to plate glass or some other glossy surface. This may be done after washing, but to ensure their leaving the surface to which they have been squeegeed, it is desirable to dry them first and then immerse in water again till limp before squeegeeing and in hot or moist climates to alum them in addition. To alum the prints insert them in a solution of for ten minutes, then wash for ten minutes and squeegee them face downwards on to the pulp, or celluloid slab, or plate glass. Pulp slabs and celluloid sheets, sold specially for this purpose, require no special preparation, but plate glass, which gives the finest results, should be first very carefully cleansed with a solution of hot washing soda, and after drying, dusted all over with French chalk rubbed on with a clean flannelette duster. All surplus chalk being removed, the prints are taken from the water and laid face downwards on the glass. A piece of rubber sheeting, or even a sheet of paper, is placed on top and a flat squeegee is drawn first down the middle and then gradually worked to either side so that all superfluous water is freed from under the print.

The sheet of glass is then stood in a dry place where there is a good current of air and when the prints are bone dry they may be easily removed if they do not drop off without assistance. Don't try to remove them till they are absolutely dry or they will be cracked and the surface spoilt. In the winter drying is accelerated by placing the squeegee slab over a kitchen range or mantelpiece.

SQUEEGEEING.

Alum ................

1 ounce.

Water ................

20 ounces.

If it is desired to mount the print with any ordinary mountant and at the same time conserve the high gloss, the print must be backed. While it is yet on the squeegee slab and about half dry, a piece of cartridge paper, fractionally smaller, is pasted and squeegeed in contact with the print. This dries with it and makes it thick enough to stand a thick mountant without the surface being affected.

BACKING THE PRINT.

Unevenness of Colour is caused by allowing the prints to stick together in the toning bath. They must be kept moving.

Red Patches that refuse to tone are usually caused by touching the surface of the paper with warm and damp fingers.

DEFECTS AND THEIR CAUSES.

P.O.P. COMBINED TONING AND FIXING BATH.

The combined bath is simple and the present results are as fine, or finer, than when using separate baths. The fault has been impermanency. Mr. A. C. E. Stanley, in Photography, suggests the following as a reliable and rapid combined bath : Make four solutions as follows : -

A.

Hypo.............

4 ounces.

Water................

20 ounces.

Ammonia 880.....

15 minims.

B.

Ammonium sulphocyanide

1 ounce.

Water to.............................

10 ounces.

C.

Lead acetate.....

1 ounce.

Water to............................

10 ounces.

D.

Gold chloride..............

15 grains.

Water to............................

15 drams.

The quantity of the bath is governed by the number of the prints to tone and fix. For twelve quarter-plates (or six half-plates or three whole-plates) make the bath as follows :-

4 ounces........................................

A.

and add in order-

2 drams............

B.

1 dram..............

C.

36 minims...........................

D.

The prints must be kept rapidly moving and removed when the colour desired is obtained.