Suitable Materials

Linen (heavy).

Madras.

Poplin.

Percale.

Indian Head Muslin.

Khaki Cloth. Habutai Silk. Silk Broadcloth. Silk Duck. Unshrinkable Flannel.

The severity of the tailored waist has been greatly lightened through the adoption by many of the open neck line, with which the coat or hem opening is more frequently used. It is well to understand, however, the method of constructing a severely tailored garment, many principles of which may be applied in the making of other garments. For this purpose the construction of a plain tailored shirtwaist with sleeves having fulness at the top will be considered (Fig. 180). Use the pattern drafted and tested in the earlier pattern making work. Remember that it does not allow seams. Provide yourself with the necessary amount of the material you have chosen.

Then proceed as follows: Fold the material so that the cut ends are together (Fig. 181). Measure up from the cut ends, the length of the front piece of the pattern at its highest point. At this point cut through both thicknesses of cloth about four inches. Tear off the selvedges from this cut, to the ends of the cloth.

Box Plait And Hem

Decide which piece of cloth will be the right-hand side of the waist when completed. On the edge from which selvedge has been torn fold the material toward the wrong side, the width you wish to have the box plait finished (Fig. 182A). If using plain materials, you need only consult your individual taste and the prevailing style, but if striped material is being used, consideration must be given to the balance of the stripes and the relation of the edge of the plait to the stripes in the body of the waist (Fig. 180). When you have made the first fold the desired width, then fold again (Fig. 1825), and one-quarter of an inch from the edge of this second fold, baste a tuck. Baste one-quarter inch from the opposite folded edge (Fig. 182C). On the edge of 312

FIG. 180.   Tailored shirtwaist, sleeves with fulness at top.

FIG. 180. - Tailored shirtwaist, sleeves with fulness at top.

the other end of cloth, lay and baste a hem one-eighth inch narrower than the box plait, being careful when using striped material to keep the succeeding stripes opposite those of the other piece of cloth.

Placing Pattern

Fold both the box plait and hem through the center lengthwise and place the straight edge of front of pattern (center front) on this fold; sleeve pattern next with narrow end beside front of waist, and the crease through the length of pattern on a stripe or on lengthwise thread of the material; the cuff pattern so that the longer edge is on the selvedge; the collar band so that it will be lengthwise around the neck; the back should be placed so that the center back is on a lengthwise fold of the goods, or on a stripe. The pocket, if used, and facing should be placed so that the center line of each from top to point is on the lengthwise thread of the goods. Place the back after the other pieces except pocket and facing have been cut out (Fig. 181). Proceed in the following manner:

Fig. 181.   Pattern placed on material for cutting shirtwaist.

Fig. 181. - Pattern placed on material for cutting shirtwaist.

Fig. 182.   Method of laying a box plait; A, first fold; B, second fold; C, plait folded and stitched; D, plait opened out.

Fig. 182. - Method of laying a box plait; A, first fold; B, second fold; C, plait folded and stitched; D, plait opened out.

1. Pin pattern to place; do not use many pins, and do not lift material from table while you pin.

2. Mark seam allowance beyond your pattern, one inch on underarm and shoulder and one-quarter inch at neck and armhole, one inch on sleeve seams and one-quarter inch at top and bottom; one-quarter inch on cuffs, collar bands and pocket. Place tape measure at edge of pattern, letting end extend beyond edge, the width of seam. Use the tape measure as a guide until eye is trained to gauge distances.

Fig. 183.   Tailor tacking or basting; A, making the stitches; B, cutting through the stitches to separate the two pieces of cloth.

Fig. 183. - Tailor tacking or basting; A, making the stitches; B, cutting through the stitches to separate the two pieces of cloth.

3. Cut out on seam allowance markings.

4. Trace waist line first; then seams, along the edge of the pattern, beginning at waist line and tracing up and down. Trace armhole and neck lines. Let tracings cross at the ends of seams (Fig. 184). In tracing, run wheel straight ahead; do not see-saw back and forth. Use tailor basting (Fig. 183) or chalk-board for marking seams of silk or wool. Tailor basting can be done along edge of pattern before removing it. With the chalk-board the seams are traced, but the wheel must be raised carefully, else the material will be cut. The chalk tracing board is a sheet of heavy cardboard on which a thick layer of paste, made of carpenter's chalk mixed with water, is laid with a flat brush. When dry, the board is covered with heavy curtain net, glued to the under side. Silk seams can be traced lightly on this, the chalk coming off sufficiently to mark them. It is inadvisable to trace anything but seams of silk. Points for trimming should be marked by pins and threads. Tailor basting., tacking or marking stitch, is made in this way: Thread a needle with double cotton, using no knots; make even running stitches, leaving a loop in each stitch above the cloth. Sew right along the edge of pattern; fold pattern back when marking other lines. Separate the two edges of material and cut through the stitches, leaving a marking line at the same point on both pieces of cloth (Fig. 183).

5. Remove the pattern from the cloth.