Plain Stitch

Form: A slanting stitch through the cloth and fold. Stitch slants on right side also.

Use: To hold folded edges in place, as hems, facings, fells, lace, etc.

To make: Conceal end of thread under a fold by passing needle through fold from left to right, then turn needle and passing to left, take up some threads of the cloth and of the fold; repeat. Hold work over first finger of left hand and keep end of work out of the way with the second finger. Each stitch slants on both right and wrong sides (Fig. 110). To join thread: Take stitch in cloth with old thread and stitch in fold with a new thread, tuck ends of the thread under fold, and sew over them.

Fig. 109.   Laying and basting a hem.

Fig. 109. - Laying and basting a hem.

Fig. 110.   Hemming stitch.

Fig. 110. - Hemming stitch.

Fig. 111.   Vertical hemming.

Fig. 111. - Vertical hemming.

Fig. 112.   French hem.

Fig. 112. - French hem.

To fasten: Take a few small running stitches in fold, and out through hole of hemming stitch.

Vertical

For sewing gathers to band.

To make: Start as in plain hemming; then take a slanting stitch through gathers into band; carry the needle straight down and repeat, so making straight stitches on upper side (Fig. 111).

Fig. 113.   Napery or damask hem; A, wrong side, hem turned and overhanded; B, right side, finished hem.

Fig. 113. - Napery or damask hem; A, wrong side, hem turned and overhanded; B, right side, finished hem.

To join and fasten: Same as plain hem.

French Hem

Turn a very narrow hem toward right side of garment, then fold hem back to wrong side, and crease. Where the fold of the hem meets the fold of the cloth, sew with overhanding stitch. When sewed, hem remains on wrong side of garment (Fig. 112). Used on neck of corset covers, etc.

Napery Or Damask Hem

Turn narrow hem to wrong side of damask, fold back to right side and crease. Then overhand the two folds, when completed, open hem out and press flat (Fig. 113).

Fig. 114.   Blind hemming.

Fig. 114. - Blind hemming.

Blind Hem

Used for sewing hems of silk, wool, or cloth when invisible sewing is desired.

Fig. 115.   Slip stitching.

Fig. 115. - Slip-stitching.

To work: Instead of taking stitch through cloth to right side, take up enough of the thread to hold, but not through to other side and then through fold of hem. Take a longer slanting stitch between hemming stitches than in plain hemming (Fig. 114).