Pipings

Pleasing effects may often be secured through the use of contrasting colors or striped materials, in the form of pipings which show just a line of color beyond the edge of the garment.

Fig. 222.   A, true bias cutting; B, joining bias strips.

Fig. 222. - A, true bias cutting; B, joining bias strips.

Fig. 223.   Correct and incorrect cutting of bias folds from twilled material; A, correct cutting, twill at right angles to edge of fold; B, incorrect cutting, twill parallel with edge of fold.

Fig. 223. - Correct and incorrect cutting of bias folds from twilled material; A, correct cutting, twill at right angles to edge of fold; B, incorrect cutting, twill parallel with edge of fold.

Cut as many bias strips, of desired width, as are necessary to give the length needed. Join these and fold through the center and baste edges together, being careful not to twist the bias as you fold the material. If the piping is to show a flat finish, press it on the wrong side, but if it is to have a rounded appearance, omit the pressing. When the piping is to be used also as a facing, let one edge extend beyond the other when folding and basting it (Fig. 224, A and B).

To Place Pipings

(1) When the piping serves as a facing as well, lay the folded edge of the piping on the right side of the part to be finished, with raw edge of the narrow side to the raw edge of the garment; baste to place and stitch as far from the folded edge as will make an attractive finish for the edge (Fig. 224, C and D). Turn raw edges of piping to wrong side of garment and baste on folded edge of garment. Turn in the raw edge of the wide side of piping and slip-stitch to garment (Fig. 225A). Should there be no strain on it, nor possibility of its turning out and showing, the edge is sometimes turned to itself and sewed with running stitches, occasionally catching it invisibly to the garment. Do not make this facing very wide, else it may draw the outside material. Press on wrong side after it is completed, to make it firm.

(2) When machine stitching is used on the garment for decoration, the edge of the garment is sometimes folded back and the piping placed under this fold, basted to place and stitched directly on the fold of the garment. This makes a strong, neat finish when outside stitching is a mode of decoration. The inner edge of the piping should be finished in either of the ways described above, or a row of stitching be applied to the edge (Fig. 225, B and C). ■ Bindings. - These make attractive finishings on certain types of garments and materials; for instance, scalloped edges of satin, taffeta or faille dresses and flounces, bound with the same material; challis or albatross bound with satin, taffeta or faille; tulle or organdie bound with silk or satin. Cotton materials may also be attractively trimmed in this way, voiles, dimities, chambray, gingham and percale, either in the same or contrasting color. The binding should be cut in bias strips twice the depth you wish the finished fold as it appears on one side of the garment, plus one-quarter-inch seams. Join the strips of bias, run them on the right side of the garment and turn to the wrong side and slip-stitch to first line of sewing. Care must be taken not to twist the bias when turning the binding for the second sewing. Bindings are sometimes stitched by machine. The method of sewing will depend upon the effect desired and the amount of time one can expend upon the finish of the garment. Bias bindings may be simulated on bias ruffles of material with no distinct right and wrong side, by turning the hem on to the right side and slip-stitching it (Fig. 226A). These folds give a soft round effect for finishing of garments.

Fig. 224.

Fig. 225.

Fig. 225.

Fig. 224.   Pipings; A, plain piping; B, piping and facing; C, placing piping, right side of garment; D, placing piping, wrong side of garment before piping is turned over.

Fig. 224. - Pipings; A, plain piping; B, piping and facing; C, placing piping, right side of garment; D, placing piping, wrong side of garment before piping is turned over.

Fig. 225. - Pipings; A, piping as facing slip-stitched to wrong side garment; B, piping stitched on right side garment; C, wrong side of B.

Fig. 226.   A, hem turned to right side of bias material; B, bias binding to finish lower edge of bias slip.

Fig. 226. - A, hem turned to right side of bias material; B, bias binding to finish lower edge of bias slip.

Fig. 227.   Folds, bias; A, plain fold; B, milliner's or French fold.

Fig. 227. - Folds, bias; A, plain fold; B, milliner's or French fold.