Draping Sleeves

Sleeves may be draped over a cardboard form (Fig. 81), or over a stuffed sleeve (Fig. 78). The stuffed sleeve has the advantage of showing the shape of the arm. The cardboard sleeve is flat, but has the advantage of allowing the hand to slip between the two thicknesses of cardboard and admits of sewing without catching the needle into cloth, and also of being re-folded to duplicate the other arm, after one sleeve has been made.

Fig. 81.   Making cardboard sleeve and collar; A, sleeve lining placed on folded cardboard; also muslin collar; B, cardboard sleeve cut out and marked; collar board also.

Fig. 81. - Making cardboard sleeve and collar; A, sleeve lining placed on folded cardboard; also muslin collar; B, cardboard sleeve cut out and marked; collar board also.

To Make Cardboard Form

Fold a piece of tough, medium weight cardboard; turn fitted sleeve right side out, fold on inside seam; lay fold on back of sleeve to folded edge of cardboard (Fig. 81A), with under side of sleeve uppermost. Trace all around edge of sleeve; also around top of under sleeve. Cut cardboard out on tracings; find the center of the lower edge of the form; draw a line at right angles to this and two inches in length; connect this short line with the elbow point, by a straight line; also with the center of the top of under sleeve (Fig. 812?). This form, when opened out, shows an outline similar to Fig. 73A.

Collar Form

Place muslin collar on single cardboard. Trace all around collar, center front and back, and lines for stays (Fig. 81A and B).

Padded Sleeve

Stitch, notch and press the seams of muslin sleeve. Turn to right side and pad either with tissue paper or curled hair. The sleeve must be most carefully stuffed, so as to keep the shape of the arm and not be too heavy to use successfully in draping. Long slivers of paper drawn through the lower part of the sleeve first, make it easier to preserve a good form when stuffing the top.

Draped Linings

Many fancy sleeves need net or chiffon linings upon which to drape the outer sleeve. These linings can be draped upon a cardboard foundation. Place the material so that the lengthwise thread follows the line of the fold in the sleeve. Allow generous seams at top and bottom. Pin seam on line of inside seam of sleeve, stretching material smooth as far as elbow;' then follow the line of the seam to wrist and pin extra amount of material in a dart following the line marked on under sleeve from elbow to wrist. Remove the lining from the cardboard, sew seams (French seam). Re-fold cardboard, make the other sleeve lining. Turn the lining right side out, draw over the board ready for draping outside material (Fig. 82A).

Mousquetaire Sleeve Over Net Lining

Pin material at the top of sleeve board, allowing fulness if desired. Let it fall so that the lengthwise thread follows the fold on back of sleeve. Draw material into soft folds running around the arm, pin occasionally to the net; let the line of the seam come through the center of the under side of the sleeve so that at the bottom it will follow the line of the dart, to permit a closing at this point. The edge of the seam may be turned in and hemmed, finished with a cord or hemstitched. The soft fold of the draping must be tacked occasionally to the net (Fig.

Fig. 82.   Draping mousquetaire sleeve and collar over cardboard forms; A, draping lining for sleeve; B, completed sleeve; C, collar, in process and completed.

Fig. 82. - Draping mousquetaire sleeve and collar over cardboard forms; A, draping lining for sleeve; B, completed sleeve; C, collar, in process and completed.

S2B). The same type of sleeve may be carried out without lining, bringing the seam in the same position.

Fig. 83.   Draping sleeve over padded form; A, method of draping; B, completed sleeve.

Fig. 83. - Draping sleeve over padded form; A, method of draping; B, completed sleeve.

One-piece close-fitting sleeves may be designed over the cardboard or stuffed sleeve by pinning the upper part of the sleeve with seam directly under the arm or on a line with inside sleeve seam, as far as the elbow, and removing the fulness at the lower part, in a dart at the elbow on the under side, or by means of tucks across the sleeve on the upper part or some other device for removing the remaining fulness (Fig. 83).