(3) Rolled Edge, Beading And Lace

The edge of the garment is sometimes rolled and whipped, to gather fulness to place, beading is then overhanded to the rolled edge and lace overhanded to the beading (Fig. 151).

Embroidery: (1) Embroidered Scallops. - Fine scalloping, with eyelets worked below for the ribbon to pass through, makes a very attractive edge. Directions for working scallops, p. 409. A bit of hand embroidery, arranged in a pleasing design, on box plait and neck, make a most attractive "Sunday best" garment (Fig. 63).

Beading, Lace Or Insertion On Raw Edges

(1) Any of the above may be set a scant one-eighth inch below the raw edge of the material and whipped to it. The edge has the appearance of being rolled.

(2) Baste lace, etc., to the right side of the garment, hem the edge on the right side, taking small stitches on the garment with fine cotton. Trim raw edge of material on wrong side to one-sixteenth inch. Whip raw edge to garment, which will make it look somewhat as if the edge were rolled. Beading or footing may then be overhanded to the lace (Figs. 152 and 153).

Fig. 151.   Edge of material gathered by rolling and whipping; beading overhanded to rolled edge, and lace overhanded to beading.

Fig. 151. - Edge of material gathered by rolling and whipping; beading overhanded to rolled edge, and lace overhanded to beading.

(3) Lace Fagotted

Lace may be applied as above and fagotted instead of being hemmed. The raw edge can be trimmed away close to the fagotting, as is done in power hemstitching (Fig. 154). Lace may also be hemmed to material, on right side of garment, the material cut away on wrong side and whipped to lace (Fig. 155).