Designing Straight Plaited Skirts Without Use Of Pattern

For stripes and plaids (Fig. 68C). (1) Take measure as for drafting skirt pattern. (2) Cut enough straight widths of material (each to equal the longest length of the skirt, plus the hem), to give the desired width around the bottom two and three-quarters to four and one-half yards. Seam these widths together; if plaids, see that they match, provision for which must have been made in cutting. Do not close the back seam. (3) Turn the hem, baste and stitch it. If the plaid is dark and light, have a dark stripe of the plaid on the lower edge of the skirt so as not to show soil so quickly.

Fig. 68.   Method of designing plaited skirts; A, marking plaits for shaped plaited skirt, using pattern; B, completed design; C, marking plaits for straight plaited skirt without pattern; also completed design; D, original design from six gore pattern, combining principles of designing yokes, panels and plaits.

Fig. 68. - Method of designing plaited skirts; A, marking plaits for shaped plaited skirt, using pattern; B, completed design; C, marking plaits for straight plaited skirt without pattern; also completed design; D, original design from six-gore pattern, combining principles of designing yokes, panels and plaits.

SIMPLE PROBLEMS IN CLOTHING DESIGN 153

(4) Measure up from the bottom of the skirt the distance from the hip line to the floor, minus the number of inches which the skirt is to be from the floor, when finished. Mark the hip line with a colored thread all the way across the skirt. Mark the centre front also with a colored thread. (5) The first plait forms the front edge of panel or box plait. Decide on the width you wish the panel at the hip and bottom. Fold the plait, using some prominent stripe for the edge of the plait, sloping it off to the width desired at the hip. The depth of the plait varies from one to three inches at the hip. The second plait should not be as deep as the succeeding plait, to avoid the fulness pushing toward the front.

Plan the depth of the plaits and the space between them according to your individual taste and the adaptability of your material. Difficulty would be experienced in the use of irregular stripes or plaid (Fig. 8, p. 29). All seams must be covered by plaits. Turn and baste the outer fold of each plait on corresponding stripes of the material. Mark the points for the inner fold of the plait and indicate the stripes to which the outer fold is to be laid. Pin and baste to place around lower edge of skirt.

(6) To adjust plaits at the hip line. From one-half the hip measure deduct one-half the front panel at hip. Divide the remainder of the hip measure by the number of plaits you have folded at the bottom to find the space to be left between at hip. Pin outer

• folds of plaits to place at the hip and baste from the hip line to the lower edge of the skirt.

(7) To adjust plaits at waist line, apply the same principle as at hip line. Pin to place and baste. Try skirt on and re-adjust plaits to belt at waist if necessary so as to make the lines good. Or, after arranging plaits at the hip, the skirt may be slipped on the person for whom it is being made, and the plaits adjusted at once to the belt. This may save the time spent in re-adjusting them, as is sometimes necessary in the first method (Fig. 680).

Problem I

Design a skirt with plait on every seam and an inverted plait in the center back.

Problem II

Design a skirt having inverted plaits on every seam.

Problem III

Design a plaited skirt having shaped lower edge.

Problem IV

Design a straight plaited skirt to use for plaid material.

Problem V

Make an original design, showing use of plaits, tucks or panels. In Fig. 68D is shown an original design having panels, yoke, and plaits.

Problem VI

Design a full size skirt for yourself, suitable for wool or linen; the skirt to be a simple tailored model.