These comprise a very large variety. In the flat-bed type there are machines that perform almost every kind and combination of stitch or stitches that can be desired. Various attachments are affixed, such as trimmers, guides that enable a large quantity of work to be put through. For instance, the High Speed Singer is shown in Fig. 213. To this can be attached a trimmer for trimming the seam at the same operation as that of closing. Two or more needle-bars can be provided, performing the same number of rows of stitching as the number of needles provided. By causing the horizontal movement of the needle-bar, some two dozen varieties of stitches may be produced. Figs. 214 and 214A show the head and under view of a Singer No. 32 machine, which makes some 33 varieties of ornamental stitches. Fig. 215 shows a Wheeler machine which can also be arranged for various purposes.

Fig. 213.

Fig. 213.

Fig. 214.

Fig. 214.

Fig. 214A

Fig. 214A

Fig. 215.

Fig. 215.

Trimmers, one or more rows, etc., are among the arrangements.

Fig. 215A.

Fig. 215A.

Fig. 215B.

Fig. 215B.

Fig. 215C.

Fig. 215C.

Fig. 2/5D.

Fig. 2/5D.

In Figs. 215A, 215B, 215C, and 215D, are shown a sketch of two rows, over-seam and variety stitch respectively. These classes of machines can also be arranged for working lace-holes (Fig. 216), and the latter illustration shows some seven holes worked upon a Wilson machine. Fancy patterns or crewel work can also be produced upon Wilson machines, as shown by Fig. 217.

Button-holes can be worked either upon a Reece, which is the best for speed, or upon a Singer. Fig. 218 shows a Singer driven by foot-power.

Cylinder machines are useful for goloshing and stitching work put together without previous pasting. Fig. 219 shows a sketch of a Singer R.H. machine.

Fig. 216.

Fig. 216.

Fig. 217.

Fig. 217.

Fig. 218.

Fig. 218.

Pillar or post machines are also very useful when adopting the method of closing referred to on p. 260.

One of the high-speed, vertical hook machines is shown in Fig. 220, and Fig. 220A shows the hook and spool and vertical shaft that imparts the motion to the hook.

Fig. 219.

Fig. 219.

The Thomas circular head or universal machine is so constructed that the "mover " or presser-foot can be made to work in any direction required. It is useful for pulling in elastics, putting on toe-cap patches, etc., and is shown in Fig. 221.

Fig. 220.

Fig. 220.

Fig. 220A.

Fig. 220A.

Fig. 221.

Fig. 221.

The reciprocating shuttle leather machine of the same make is shown in Fig. 222.

Fig. 222.

Fig. 222.

See Page 274.