In case the indebtedness is for borrowed money, possibly a small amount, for which no promissory note was given, the easiest method, probably, of disposing of the matter, when it is discovered that the individual does not intend to pay, is to erase the transaction from the memorandum and forget the affair entirely, if possible; considering yourself fortunate in discovering, before loaning a larger amount, that the borrower was a dead beat. It may be best that you continue on friendly terms, and you cannot afford to break pleasant relations tor a small amount of money, though by this neglect the borrower has forever forfeited your confidence, unless the matter is satisfactorily explained. Should you propose, however, to press collection, a letter similar to the following may be written:

REMINDER NO. I.

Galesburg, ILL., Aug. 15, 1877. Mr. Webster :

The ten dollars borrowed by you on the Fourth of July was to have been paid, according to agreement, on last Monday. Thinking that, possibly, the matter had escaped your recollection, I take this means of reminding you of the fact.

Respectfully Yours,

CHAS. B. WEEKS.

No attention being paid to this letter, it may be well enough to write one letter more, as follows:

REMINDER NO. 2.

Galesburg, ILL., Aug. 24, 1877. Mr. Webster:

I mailed a note to your address some days since, in relation to money borrowed of me on the Fourth. I fear you must have failed to receive it, otherwise you surely would have given it your attention. As I put all unsettled accounts into the hands of a justice for collection next week on Wednesday, I should like to see you before that time.

Respectfully Yours,

CHAS. B. WEEKS.

Legal Proceedings

You have exhausted the usual moral means of collecting your due, and the debt is not yet paid. It is proposed now to collect it, if possible, by legal process.

In the first place, can it be collected ? Is the debtor worth enough to be compelled to pay it, aside from the property which the law exempts? What does the law exempt? (See "Exemptions from Forced Sale," elsewhere), which applies to heads of families; also, {"Limitations" elsewhere.

Being satisfied that the debt is collectible, you now place the account in the hands of a Justice of the Peace, unless the amount to be collected is so large as to be out of the justice's jurisdiction. The amount which can be collected through a justice varies in different States.

Limit Of Jurisdiction With Justice Of The Peace

The following shows the largest amount in the different States and Territories which the justice of the peace, through his official position, can have jurisdiction over:

Alabama

$100

Arizona

300

Arkansas

300

California

300

Colorado

300

Connecticut

100

Dakota Ter.

100

Delaware.

100

Florida

100

Georgia

100

Idaho Ter.

300

Illinois

200

Indiana

200

Iowa

100*

Kansas

300

Kentucky

50

Louisiana

$100

Maine

20

Maryland

100

Massachusetts

300

Michigan

300

Minnesota

100

Mississippi

150

Missouri.

250

Montana.

300

Nebraska

200

Nevada

300

New Hampshire

100

New Jersey

200

New Mexico Ter

100

New York

100

North Carolina

200

Ohio

8300

Oregon

250

Pennsylvania

300

Rhode Island

100

South Carolina

100

Tennessee

1,000

Texas

200

Utah Ter

300

Vermont

200

Virginia.

100

Washington Ter

300

West Virginia

300

Wisconsin

200

Wyoming Ter

100

* By consent of parties, $300.

First Legal Steps

The amount to be collected being within the jurisdiction of the justice, he will issue a Summons, which will be taken by a constable to the debtor, if he can be found, and read to him, which is termed "serving a summons" upon the person owing the debt.