The Pay department is charged with the punctual payment of the troops, and is presided over by the Paymaster-General, and as many assistant paymasters as are required to perform that duty.

The Bureau of Military Justice has control of the proceedings of courts-martial, courts of military inquiry, military commissions, etc.

Salaries Of Leading Army Officers

The General of the army ranks next in command to the President in the control of the national troops. He has a salary of $13,500 a year, and selects from the army such a number of aids, not exceeding six, as he may deem necessary, who, while serving on his stall, bear the rank of colonels of cavalry.

The Lieutenant-General of the army ranks next below the General; has a salary of $11,000 a year, and is allowed to select from the army two aids and a military secretary, who rank as lieutenant-colonels of cavalry while serving on his staff.

Three Major-Generals have command under the Lieutenant-General. Each is entitled to $7,500 a year, forage for five horses, and three aids, whom he may select from captains or lieutenants in the army, whose pay over and above the pay of their rank is $200 a year.

Six Brigadier-Generals, each drawing $5,500 a year, and each having two aids, who may be selected by him from lieutenants in the army. Each draws forage for four horses.

Officers Of A Regiment Of Artillery

Each regiment of artillery is commanded by one Colonel, one Lieutenant-Colonel, one Major for every four batteries, one Adjutant, one Quartermaster and Commissary, one Sergeant-Major, one Quartermaster-Sergeant, one chief musician (who is an instructor of music), and two principal musicians; the Adjutant and Quarter-master and Commissary are extra Lieutenants, selected from the first or second lieutenants of the regiment. Each battery of artillery is officered by one Captain, one First Lieutenant, one Second Lieutenant, one First Sergeant, one Quartermaster-Sergeant, four Sergeants, four Corporals, two musicians, two artificers and one wagoner; but one First Lieutenant, one Second Lieutenant, two Sergeants and four Corporals may be added to each battery, at the discretion of the President.

Officers Of A Regiment Of Cavalry

Each regiment of cavalry has for its officers one Colonel, one Lieutenant-Colonel, three Majors, one Surgeon, one Assistant-Surgeon, one Adjutant, one Quartermaster, one Veterinary Surgeon (with the rank of regimental Sergeant-Major), one Sergeant-Major, one Quartermaster-Sergeant, one Saddler-Sergeant, one chief musician (who is an instructor of music), and one chief trumpeter. Two Assistant-Surgeons may be allowed to each regiment, and four regiments have an additional Veterinary Surgeon. The Adjutant and the Quartermaster of each regiment are extra Lieutenants, selected from the first or second lieutenants of the regiment. Each troop of cavalry is officered by one Captain, one First Lieutenant, one Second Lieutenant, one First Sergeant, one Quartermaster-Sergeant, five Sergeants, four Corporals, two trumpeters, two farriers, one saddler and one wagoner.

Officers Of A Regiment Of Infantry

The officers of each infantry regiment consist of one Colonel, one Lieutenant-Colonel, one Major, one Adjutant, one Quartermaster, one Sergeant-Major, one Quartermaster-Sergeant, one chief musician, two principal musicians. The Adjutant and the Quartermaster are extra lieutenants, selected from the first or second lieutenants of the regiment. Each company of infantry is officered by one Captain, one First Lieutenant, one Second Lieutenant, one First Sergeant, one Quartermaster-Sergeant, four Sergeants, four Corporals, two artificers, two musicians, and one wagoner.

Salaries Of Regimental Officers

Colonels receive as compensation $3,500 a year, and forage for two horses; Lieutenant-Colonels, $3,000 a year, and forage for two horses; Majors, $2,500ayear, and forage for two horses; Captains, mounted, $2,000 a year, and forage for two horses; Captains, not mounted, $1,800 a year; Adjutants, $1,800 a year, and forage for two horses; Regimental Quartermasters, $1,800 a year, and forage for two horses; First Lieutenants, mounted. 81,600 a year, and forage for two horses; First Lieutenants, not mounted, 81,500 a year; Second Lieutenants, mounted, $l,500ayear, and forage for two horses; Second Lieutenants, not mounted, $1,100 a year; Chaplains. 81,500 a year, and forage for two horses; Acting Assistant Commissaries, 8100 a year in addition to the pay of their rank, Ordnance Store-keeper and Paymaster at the Springfield (Mass.) Armory, $2,500, and forage for two horses; all other Store-keepers, $2,000 a year, and forage for two horses. Each commissioned officer below the rank of a Brigadier-General, including Chaplains and others whose rank or pay assimilates, are allowed 10 per cent. of their current yearly pay for each term of five years of service.

The Pay Of Enlisted Men

The following enlisted men are paid these sums monthly during their first terms of enlistment, with some modifications prescribed by law: Sergeant - Majors of cavalry, artillery and infantry, $23 each; Quartermaster-Sergeants of cavalry, artillery and infantry, 823 each; chief trumpeters of cavalry, 822; principal musicians of artillery and infantry, $22; chief musicians of regiments, 860, and the allowances of a Quartermaster-Sergeant; Saddler Sergeants of cavalry, 822; First Sergeants of cavalry, artillery and infantry, 822; Sergeants of cavalry, artillery and infantry, $17; Corporals of cavalry and light artillery, 815; Corporals of artillery and infantry, 815; saddlers of cavalry, $15; blacksmiths and farriers of cavalry, $15; trumpeters of cavalry, $13; musicians of artillery and infantry, 813; privates of cavalry, artillery and infantry, 813; Sergeant-Majors of engineers, $36; Quartermaster-Sergeants of engineers, 836; Sergeants of engineers and ordnance, 834; Corporals of engineers and ordnance, $20; musicians of engineers, $13; privates (first class) of engineers and ordnance, $17; privates (second class) of engineers and ordnance, $13. To these rates of pay $1 a month is added for the third year of enlistment, $1 for the fourth year, and one more for the fifth year, making $3 a month increase for the last year of enlistment; but this increase is "retained pay," and is not given to the soldier until his term is ended, and it is forfeited if he misbehaves himself before he receives his discharge. Occasional extra services by soldiers and non-commissioned officers also entitle them to additional pay.