PASSPORTS are written permits, furnished for $5.00 each, to citizens of this country to travel unmolested in European or other dominions, virtually commending them to the protection of the foreign governments which they may visit. The Secretary of State of the United States at Washington, is alone authorized to grant and issue passports; but the ministers and other diplomatic representatives of our government abroad may also grant, issue and verify passports. None but citizens of the United States can receive passports, and they are only issued under such rules as the President of the United States prescribes. The unlawful granting or verifying of a passport by any officer of the United States subjects him to punishment by fine or imprisonment. Collectors of customs may also issue passports to United States vessels visiting foreign ports, and the master of the vessel is punished if he sails from an American port to a foreign country without one.

The name, age and residence of the individual applying for a passport, with a description of his person and appearance, are entered in it, for the purpose of properly identifying him. Though passports possess less importance now than formerly, it is well for the traveler abroad to always procure one before commencing a foreign journey.

Passports are engraved and printed, in large letters and open lines, on parchment. The following is the form:

Form of Passport for Citizen of the United States when Traveling Abroad.

Form of Passport for Citizen of the United States when Traveling Abroad.