File Content Type

Subversion joins the ranks of the many applications that recognize and make use of Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME) content types. Besides being a general-purpose storage location for a file's content type, the value of the svn:mime-type file property determines some behavioral characteristics of Subversion itself.

For example, one of the benefits that Subversion typically provides is contextual, line-based merging of changes received from the server during an update into your working file. But for files containing nontextual data, there is often no concept of a “line.” So, for versioned files whose svn:mime-type property is set to a nontextual MIME type (generally, something that doesn't begin with text/, though there are exceptions), Subversion does not attempt to perform contextual merges during updates. Instead, any time you have locally modified a binary working copy file that is also being updated, your file is left untouched and Subversion creates two new files. One file has a .oldrev extension and contains the BASE revision of the file. The other file has a .newrev extension and contains the contents of the updated revision of the file. This behavior is really for the protection of the user against failed attempts at performing contextual merges on files that simply cannot be contextually merged.

Warning

The svn:mime-type property, when set to a value that does not indicate textual file contents, can cause some unexpected behaviors with respect to other properties. For example, since the idea of line endings (and therefore, line-ending conversion) makes no sense when applied to nontextual files, Subversion will prevent you from setting the svn:eol-style property on such files. This is obvious when attempted on a single file target—svn propset will error out. But it might not be as clear if you perform a recursive property set, where Subversion will silently skip over files that it deems unsuitable for a given property.

Beginning in Subversion 1.5, users can configure a new mime-types-file runtime configuration parameter, which identifies the location of a MIME types mapping file. Subversion will consult this mapping file to determine the MIME type of newly added and imported files.

Also, if the svn:mime-type property is set, then the Subversion Apache module will use its value to populate the Content-type: HTTP header when responding to GET requests. This gives your web browser a crucial clue about how to display a file when you use it to peruse your Subversion repository's contents.



[11] You think that was rough? During that same era, WordPerfect also used .DOC for their proprietary file format's preferred extension!