Google has a nice synonyms feature built right into the main search engine. Using the "~" (tilde) operator preceding a word, you can search not only for the word itself but similar words as well. These aren't always synonyms (in the sense that they are different words with the same meaning); they are often simply related words with a different meaning.

To find out all the synonyms Google stores for a word, you can enter the word using the synonyms operator, but then exclude the word afterwards using the minus operator. Like here for the word "home":

~home -home

Since Google now can't show you results with "home," it must show you synonyms of home only. Those will be rendered in bold. If you want to find all the synonyms for a given term, you can continue excluding the synonyms you find until you hit an end and no more results are returned, like this:

~home -home -official -house -interior -homer -real-estate

That's already interesting, but you can also abuse Google synonyms. How? Just replace every word in a given story with Google's first synonym for that word! Of course, that's a boring task to do manually so I automated it. You can use the Synonym Storyteller tool (www.55fun.com/synonym/) to copy and paste your story. Hit submit, and it will be rendered in its synonyms for often surprising (and often, just nonsense) results.

As an example, here is the beginning of a fairy tale by the Brother's Grimm. It's called The Fisherman and His Wife and I will present a part of it first in its original wording, and afterwards, in a version which has been changed by the Synonym Storyteller (for the full tale, see authorama.com/grimms-fairy-tales-10.html).

The Fisherman and His Wife: The Original

There was once a fisherman who lived with his wife in a pigsty, close by the seaside. The fisherman used to go out all day long a-fishing; and one day, as he sat on the shore with his rod, looking at the sparkling waves and watching his line, all on a sudden his float was dragged away deep into the water: and in drawing it up he pulled out a great fish. But the fish said, "Pray let me live! I am not a real fish; I am an enchanted prince: put me in the water again, and let me go!" "Oh, ho!" said the man, "you need not make so many words about the matter; I will have nothing to do with a fish that can talk: so swim away, sir, as soon as you please!" Then he put him back into the water, and the fish darted straight down to the bottom, and left a long streak of blood behind him on the wave.

When the fisherman went home to his wife in the pigsty, he told her how he had caught a great fish, and how it had told him it was an enchanted prince, and how, on hearing it speak, he had let it go again. "Did not you ask it for anything?" said the wife, "we live very wretchedly here, in this nasty dirty pigsty; do go back and tell the fish we want a snug little cottage."

The fisherman did not much like the business: however, he went to the seashore; and when he came back there the water looked all yellow and green. And he stood at the water's edge, and said:

"O man of the sea!
Hearken to me!
My wife Ilsabill
Will have her own will,
And hath sent me to beg a boon of thee!"

The Fisherman and His Wife: The Synonym Version

There was once a fisherman who lived with his daughter in a pigsty, closing by the seaside. The fisherman for sale to british out all holiday longest a-fishing; and 1 holiday, as he sat on the shor with his rodd, looking at the sparkling waves and watching his liner, all on a sudden his floating was dragged a way deep in to the water: and in cartoon it ups he pulled out a greater fish. But the fish said, "Pray letting millennium live! I am not a realplayer fish; I am an enchanted prince: putting millennium in the river again, and letting millennium go!" "Oh, ho!" said the manual, "you needing not build southern many dictionary about the matter; I will having nothingness to does with a fish that canned talk: southern pool a way, immigration, as soon as you please!" Then he putting him back in to the river, and the fish darted straight down to the bottom, and leftist a longest streak of blood behind him on the surf.

When the fisherman went official to his daughter in the pigsty, he told her how he had caught a greater fish, and how it had told him it was an enchanted prince, and how, on listening it learn, he had letting it british again. "Did not you asking it for anything?" said the daughter, "we radio cool wretchedly hear, in this nasty funny pigsty; does british back and telling the fish we want a snug tiny cottage.'

The fisherman mpd not muchmusic like the business: however, he went to the seashore; and when he come back there the river looked all business and environment. And he stood at the water's little thrill, and said:


"O manual of the sea!
Hearken to me!
My daughter Ilsabill
Will having her build will,
And hath sent millennium to beg a boon of thee!'