The next problem of this series is the electric lantern, the construction of which involves straight bending, riveting, and raising, the same as the candlesticks shown in chapter XI (Annealing, Riveting, Seaming).

The photographe show four distinct styles of supports and fastenings for the lantern: some are made to hang from the ceiling, Figs. 49, 52, 55, 57; others, from the side wall, Figs. 46, 47, 50, 51, 54; one is a desk or piano light, Fig. 56; and two are table lights, Figs. 53, 55. The construction of the lantern itself is the same in' all cases, varying only in the size and design, and the material may be either copper or brass. The parts of the lantern are the handle, top, four corners, four top cross-pieces, four bottom cross-pieces, and eight small pieces to hold the glass. The various parts are held together wholly by rivets, a method of construction which makes a strong, durable piece of work and adds greatly to the decorative effect. Soft solder should never be used on work of this kind, as it will soon break away, making the work a constant source of annoyance instead of an object of utility and beauty.

Fig. 46. Electric lantern.

Fig. 46. Electric lantern.

Fig . 47. Electric side light.

Fig. 47. Electric side light.

Fig. 48. Details of construction.

Fig. 48. Details of construction.

It is best to make the top of the lantern first; this is usually from 5" to 7" square. Always cut the metal for the top 1/2" larger than the finished top is to be. This extra 1/2" is to allow for squaring and lapping the edge. When the metal is cut to the required size, draw a pencil line parallel with the edges, where the top will start to be beaten or "raised" upward. The location of this pencil line is indicated by the arrows on the drawing, No. 1, Fig. 48.

With the neck hammer beat down the metal over the edge of a block of wood held in the vise, using the method shown for the match-holder base.6

Fig. 49. Lanterns.

Fig. 49. Lanterns.