There is one other method of making a shape that cannot be made by any of the methods previously described, and that is the method used in making the flower jar shown in Fig. 126. This piece is square, with sharp corners, and it would be very difficult, if not impossible, to make it by any of the previously described methods. So a pattern is developed from a drawing, and laid out on a flat piece of metal; the metal is cut to the pattern, the four sides are bent to the shape of the original drawing, and the corners are soldered together with silver solder. The white silver solder may be seen on the corners of the jar, as the jar was not polished or colored when the photograph was taken.

Fig . 125. Showing extent to which a cramped seam will stretch.

Fig. 125. Showing extent to which a cramped seam will stretch.

Fig. 120. Flower vase seamed at corners.

Fig. 120. Flower vase seamed at corners. "Chased" decoration.

Fig 127. Lamp with

Fig 127. Lamp with "cramped" seam base.

The details of this method of pattern development are as follows: First, draw an accurate full-size outline of the desired shape, as shown at 3, Fig. 124, and draw the center line A-B. Carefully divide the center line into 1/4" spaces with the pencil dividers, and draw lines clear across the drawing on the 1/4" points. Ignore the feet, as they can easily be beaten out when the shape is finished. Starting at the bottom, number the lines 1, 2, 3, etc., as shown in the sketch. Next, draw a new center line C-D, as at 4. With the pencil dividers, carefully measure the distance on sketch 3 from the point where the line 1 intersects the outline (where the arrow mark is) to the point where line No. 2 intersects the outline. Lay this distance off on the new center line C-D, and number the points 1 and 2, respectively. Continue with the remainder of the points, remembering always to measure the distance on the outside line of sketch No. 3 and to lay it off on the center line C-D of the sketch No. 4, being sure to number them as you lay them off. This work must be done accurately or the vase will not be the shape desired. When the transference of points is completed, there will be on the new center line the same number of points as on the old center line, but they will not be equally spaced. The next step is to place one leg of the dividers at the point where the center line and line No. 1 intersect on the No. 3 sketch, and measure the distance to where the same line intersects the outside line (where the arrow mark is). Lay this distance off on both sides on line No. 1 on the No. 4 sketch. Do the same thing with all the other lines, and the result will be a series of points the same as on the left side of the No. 4 sketch. Connect these points, as on the right side, and you will have a pattern of one side that when bent to shape will be the shape and size of the original sketch. With a piece of transparent tracing paper copy the outline of the pattern of the side, and then lay off a square the size of the bottom of the flower jar and transfer the pattern of the side to. each of the four sides of the square bottom, as shown in sketch No. 5, and you will have a completed pattern of the flower jar.

Stick the pattern on to a flat piece of 18-gage copper, or transfer it to the copper with carbon paper, and cut or saw the metal to the same shape as the pattern. Carefully file the edges to the correct shape and also file them to a bevel so that they will fit together at the corners. Bend each side upward and inward until the corners come together, then solder with silver solder the four corners as far as they fit together, then bend each side upward and inward a little more and solder again, continuing this process until the top is reached. Remember to keep the seams clean and free from dirt or grease of any kind; it is best to cover the entire length of each seam with borax, which will keep it clean, and also protect it from oxidation.

After it has been "pickled" and cleaned, if it is to be left plain it is ready for "planishing." In such a complicated shape it will probably be advisable to fill it with pitch and planish the metal smooth on the pitch after it has become hard. This method of planishmg was described in chapter XVII (Raising By Wrinkling, Seaming).

Fig. 128. First process in chasing; The right hand side shows the student's

Fig. 128. First process in chasing; The right-hand side shows the student's first attempt.

Fig. 129. Chased copper plate, showing an application of the method of beating down the background with the planisher chasing tools.

Fig. 129. Chased copper plate, showing an application of the method of beating down the background with the planisher chasing tools.

Fig. 130. Chased blotter, in which the background was beaten down from the front, and also the design beaten up from the back.

Fig. 130. Chased blotter, in which the background was beaten down from the front, and also the design beaten up from the back.