Magazine advertisements are popular for illustrating books, posters and reading charts in school. Because of their fine color they are also very desirable in the making of many worthwhile articles.

Christmas Cards

Cut a small hole, any desired shape (round, square, rectangular, triangular, diamond) in a piece of wrapping paper. Use this as a finder moving it over colored pictures in magazines until a desirable bit is found to use on a card. Draw around the finder and cut out the picture thus outlined. Mount on a single piece of heavy wrapping paper tinted with water colors or on wall paper. The cards may be made by folding the paper once or twice and pasting the picture on the cover or inside. Envelopes for these cards may be made as shown opposite page 44, using the same material as the card.

The cards may be made into folders which require no envelope for mailing. Small pictures may be cut out without a finder and used on cards. Suitable for all grades.

Illustration from the Saturday Evening

Illustration from the Saturday Evening Post reproduced by special permission from The Beatrice Creamery Company.

Christmas card made by the use of a finder, and how to make an envelope for the card.

Stephen F. Whitman and Son

Illustrations from the Saturday Evening Post reproduced by special permission from Stephen F. Whitman and Son, Inc., California Prune and Apricot Growers Association and the Campbell Soup Company.

Christmas folder and four valentines made by using magazine pictures, a doily, wall paper and wrapping paper.

Valentines

1. Make a round finder, choose a picture and paste to a fancy paper doily.

2. With the round finder choose a picture and paste it to a circle of white wrapping paper with lace edges.

3. Make a heart-shaped finder, choose a suitable picture, cut it out and mount on wrapping paper and cut lace around the edges.

4. Many varieties of valentines may be made similar to the Christmas cards described above. Wall paper may be used instead of colored pictures from magazines. Laces of all kinds may be cut from wrapping paper. Suitable for all grades.

Checker Board

Cut sixty-four squares from the colored pictures in magazines. Light and dark backgrounds from pictures with few figures are the best. Paste the squares to a piece of cardboard from a heavy box. A border may be cut from more elaborately decorated colored pictures and pasted in place. A coat of shellac or varnish will make a firmer surface for the board. Black and white buttons may be used for checkers. Suitable for middle and upper grades.

Puzzles

Cut a large bright colored picture from a magazine, put paste all over the back and paste to a piece of cardboard from a suit box. Press under a pile of books and when thoroughly dry trim the edges and cut into odd shaped pieces. A coat of shellac or varnish will make the puzzle more durable. Children like to set each others' puzzles together. Suitable for middle and upper grades.

Beads

Cut a long slender triangle from a colored magazine picture. Cover the wrong side of it with paste and roll into a bead on a piece of wire, hair pin or tooth pick. Slip off and dry. A coat of shellac will give the beads a more finished appearance. Beads of different thickness and length may be made. Long straight pieces of paper will make beads the same thickness thruout and with flat ends. Beads may be strung on string with discarded glass or wooden beads between them. Suitable for all grades.

Belts, Bracelets And Napkin Rings

Choose magazine pictures that are harmonious in color. Cut them into pieces half as wide as they are long (three by six inches is a good size). Fold pieces into links and fit links together as shown on page 47. Use a large pin for a buckle on the belt. Fasten ends together to make bracelets and napkin rings. Scraps of white and colored cellophane paper, envelope linings or other colored papers may be used instead of magazine pictures. Suitable for all grades.

Painting by Anton Otto Fischer

Painting by Anton Otto Fischer, reproduced by special permission from the Saturday Evening Poet.

Checker board made by pasting pieces from magazine advertisements to heavy cardboard. Puzzle made from a magazine illustration.

Beads made from colored magazine pictures

Beads made from colored magazine pictures. Belt and bracelet, showing process of making from magazine advertisements.