As you advance, so must your rope. Maguey ropes made from the maguey plant in old Mexico are used for fancy horse roping, in contests where experts "call their shots" -meaning the foot they intend to catch. Small loops are used to catch the front feet, a hind foot, or the stirrup of the rider; large loops are employed to catch all four feet. Horses to be roped in such contests are always managed by good riders who know how to pull up to keep them from being burned by the rope.

But you'd better enjoy this kind of roping from the sidelines until you have mastered the rope-spinning tricks.

IN SPINNING, an even, rotary motion must be maintained to keep the loop from closing. Since the rope kinks easily, tricks should be learned in pairs so that the kinks put in by one trick will be removed by the following one

THE ARMY's 10 KNOTS . . . AND HOW TO TIE THEM

ANCHOR KNOT-used to fasten a cable or rope to an anchor, or for use when there will be a slacking and tightening motion on the rope

MOORING KNOT

MOORING KNOT-used to make fast a rope to mooring post or snubbing post. permits a load to be eased off without losing control of rope.

BOWLINE ON A BIGHT

BOWLINE ON A BIGHT used when a double loop or sling is required, as in a boatswain's chair. also to form a loop in a rope when ends are not available

THE BOWLINE

THE BOWLINE-used TO FORM A LOOP OF ANY DESIRED SIZE, THAT WILL NOT SLIR EASY TO TIE AND UNTIE. WILL NOT JAM

SQUARE KNOT

SQUARE KNOT-used to join two ropes of equal sizes

SINGLE SHEET BEND

SINGLE SHEET BEND-

USED TO JOIN TWO ROPES OF DIFFERENT SIZES

MAKING A SINGLE SHEET BEND

NOTE-WHEN MAKING A SINGLE SHEET BEND, THE FIRST BIGHT SHOLD BE MADE WITH THE HEAVIER ROPE

TIMBER HITCH-

USED TO HAUL LOGS,SPARS, OR ANY LONG, ROUND OBJECT WITH POLL PARALLELTO OBJECT.TENSION SHOULD BE MAINTAINED AT ALL TIMES. EASY TO TIE AND UNTIE AND WILL NOT JAM

ROUND TURN AND TWO HALF HITCHES

ROUND TURN AND TWO HALF HITCHES -

USED TO FASTEN A ROPE TO A SPAR OR OTHER OBJECT

(FOR PERMANENCY, RUNNING END SHOULD BE SEIZED TO STANDING PART)

CLOVE HITCH

CLOVE HITCH -

MOST WIDELY USED HITCH IN FIELD RIGGING. WILL TIGHTEN AS TENSION IS APPLIED,NO MATTER WHICH END OF HITCH IS PULLED ON. USED TO FASTEN GUY LINES TO ANCHORAGES AND SPARS

THE ROLLING HITCH

THE ROLLING HITCH-

USED WHEN FASTENING ONE ROPE TO ANOTHER, ESPECIALLY A SMALL ROPE TO A LARGER ONE

A SMALL ROPE TO A LARGER ONEThe rolling hitch is a quick

The rolling hitch is a quick, secure knot. Here the engineer uses It to fasten the small piece of rope in his hand to a large one.

Any Boy Can Operate This Novel String Telegraph

No Code Need Be Memorized to Operate This String Telegraph

A NOVEL TELEGRAPH

A NOVEL TELEGRAPH capable of furnishing much amusement, yet efficient enough for practical use, can be easily made of odds and ends. The apparatus described below was first built for two boys of the neighborhood who were convalescing in adjacent houses, their bedrooms facing across a small yard, who have since applied it for use in a dairy, a foundry and a farmhouse. In the foundry the transmitting cord was almost 300 feet long.

The principle of the device is elementary, its operation depending on the fact that a cord suspended between two pulleys and weighted at each end, as shown in Fig. 1, will move at one end in exact relation to a movement applied at the other end if there is no undue stretching of the transmitting cord itself.

Two identical instruments are necessary. Described here is the simplest type, such as was built for the boys, with suggested improvements which followed on the later models. On a base A, as shown in Fig. 2, two uprights B were placed 30 inches apart and then braced by four arms C, nailed against blocks D. At each outer end of the braces ordinary spools E were placed to serve as pulleys.

On a line connecting the tops of these spools a hole was drilled through each upright to allow free play for the transmitting cord, and exactly 1 inch above these holes another set was drilled to handle a conveyor wire.

From this conveyor, which is merely a wire stretched between the two upper holes and tightened at each end by wedges as shown at K, an indicator block is suspended so that it may be moved back and forth by the transmitting cord.

This block and the transmitting cord itself are the only parts of the apparatus on which much care must be spent. The block, which is shown in Fig. 3 with its principal dimensions, consists of two halves fastened together at the middle by screws. One of the halves carries the index pointer F, which can be made from thin plywood or even tin.

The halves fit together over the conveyor wire and against the transmitting cord by means of holes 1 inch apart as shown. These holes can be scribed on the facing sides of each half, the upper mark being sufficiently deep to provide a loose fit for the conveyor wire, and the lower so shallow that it will act as a clamp over the transmitting cord.

The transmitting cord is a thick fishline (a drop line is the best type) which has been soaked in water overnight and then stretched full length in the sun to dry. Then it must be soaked in a basin of melted candle wax and again stretched overnight after the surplus wax has been removed with a cloth. This treatment produces a practically weather- and stretchproof cord.

The alphabetical index is left until each of the two instruments is almost completed. Since this index must tally exactly on each instrument, it is better to make two at a time, using one as a pattern so that the other will be identical.

The index is shown at J in Fig. 2. It consists of a strip of cardboard with a bottom edge marked into 1-inch divisions. Two of these divisions are left clear at the left end, and the alphabet is lettered in, starting with the third division and using one space for each letter. When this is completed, the cardboard is fastened between the uprights against small blocks of wood, the bottom edge with its lettering being 3/8 inch in front of, and 3/8 inch above, the conveyor wire.

Installation of the telegraph can be quickly completed. In the case of the sick boys, one of the instruments was clamped on a table in each room, making sure that each index card faced in the same direction and that the conveyor wires were in line with each other. The transmitting cord was strung between the rooms and threaded through the proper holes, a weight being fastened at each end. In this case the weights were ordinary sash weights. Since one was lighter than the other, a spot of lead was added to give balance.

After the cord was stretched, the index blocks were fastened with the aid of a helper. The index block on one instrument was tightened against the transmitting cord and so held that its pointer indicated the letter A on the index. Then the second block was fastened to point at A, and the apparatus was ready for use.

In operating the telegraph, the boys wiggled the pointer to indicate that a message was ready, then transmitted it letter by letter, using the same wiggling motion to mark spaces between words. In time, they developed great speed and discovered they could transmit more quickly on the string telegraph than on a regular telegraph circuit using the Morse code.

How the instruments are connectedperspective of one instrument

How the instruments are connected (Fig I), perspective of one instrument (Fig. 2), and detail of indicator (Fig. 3).

detail of indicator