Under the title, "The New Lace Embroidery (Punto Tagliato)," Miss Louisa A. Tebbs has written a practical guide to a style of needlework which she is teaching with much success, and which, being thoroughly artistic, certainly deserves to be popular - hateful word. Our author, a past-mistress of her craft, says that there are altogether about 300 different kinds of stitches which can be adapted to Punto Tagliato, and " from these as many more can be invented and arranged by the imaginative worker." Of course, she does not claim literally that " Punto Tagliato" is "new" - that is evident from her adoption of the old Italian name (which means " cut-out lace ") as the sub-title of her book. The main point of difference between the old " Punto Tagliato" and the method she has introduced, and is teaching, is shown by the two illustrations reproduced on the opposite page. In the one it is the ground that is cut out; in the other it is the pattern - "the parts between the design are filled in with fancy stitches, the material afterwards cut away from the back of these stitches, leaving an open network of beautiful lace-like effect on a solid foundation." For the stitchery rather coarse floss silk is used. The material need by no means be confined to linen; velvet, cloth, or silk will do, but the last-named "must be of special make, soft and strong." The printing and illustrations of the book are excellent. (Chapman and Hall, Ltd. 2s. 6d. net.)

The New Lace Embroidery (Punto Tagliato).

Collar on Oatmeal Silk with Embroidery

Collar on "Oatmeal" Silk with Embroidery in White Floss, in the New Punto Tagliato

Style, introduced by Louisa A. Tebbs.

One of Nine Squares of a Bedspread, in the Old Punto Tagliato Style, with the Cut out Background. By Louisa A. Tebbs.

One of Nine Squares of a Bedspread, in the Old Punto Tagliato Style, with the Cut out Background. By Louisa A. Tebbs.

(By courtesy of Messrs. Chapman & Hall, Ltd.)'