(To be concluded.)

Oak Chest of Drawers with Cupboards.

Oak Chest of Drawers with Cupboards.

Designed by Ambrose Heal, Junr. Exhibited by Messrs. Heal & Sons.

The newspapers inveigh against the extravagant pampering of pet dogs that is prevalent in a certain "set," but there is nothing new in this form of fashionable folly. In France, in the eighteenth century, Havard tells us of hutches for pet dogs, of basket-work lined with silk, of walnut inlaid with ebony, of marquetry with ornaments in gilt bronze. Madame de Pompadour's dogs had a hutch covered with damask, and supplied within with mattresses and coverlets. Another pet animal had one in yellow Genoa damask, which might be taken apart in summer and mounted as a bedstead, with canopy and curtains fringed with silver. Still another had a chateau like a lord, with its jet d'eau and wrought grille at the entrance.

The colours of precious stones vary much. Mineralogists recognise the different kinds by their crystallisation, their hardness and chemical" composition, whatever their colour, but lapidaries and their customers have agreed that the most desirable varieties of each gem are those in which the typical colour is purest and strongest. Thus the diamond should he most transparent, the purest crystal coming next, and strass after. The best strass is made with powdered rock crystal, oxide of lead, potash, borax and white oxide of arsenic. The ruby should be of a lake or carmine tone; garnet, of a dark, purplish lake; sapphire, of an ultramarine blue; chrysolite, greenish yellow; beryl, yellowish green; emerald, green; amethyst, deep violet; tourmaline, between brown and green; opal, milk white, with flame-coloured and greenish-blue reflections; carnelian, a cherry red; jet, black. This last, it should be remembered, is inflammable.

Enamelled Cast iron Mantelpiece.

Enamelled Cast-iron Mantelpiece.

Designed by Mr. Francis D., Bedford for the Teale Fireplace Company.

Enamelled Cast iron Mantelpiece 2.

Enamelled Cast-iron Mantelpiece.

Designed by Mr. Francis D. Bedford for the Teale Fireplace Company.

Smoker's Cabinet, in Carved Oak. By Marie Jefferson.

Smoker's Cabinet, in Carved Oak. By Marie Jefferson.

"A Good seamstress is known by a short thread " is an adage which some needle-workers take comfort in repeating to, a novice struggling with a tangling line and fast tangling patience. It may be said, however, that this old saying is founded on fallacy.

Carved Dyptich, enclosing a Set of Picture Frames.

Carved Dyptich, enclosing a Set of Picture Frames.

Designed by J. Lawrence. Executed by J. Ridsdale. Exhibited at the arts and Crafts Exhibition at Leeds.

When skill has been acquired through practice, a long thread which is allowed to How easily and guarded against catching in surrounding objects is much better. The constant interruption caused by threading the needle interferes greatly with the evenness of work, and is likely to break the surface by the fastening necessary at both ends of the thread. If the thread commences to wear, its gloss and smoothness can often be restored by passing it quickly between the edge of the thumb-nail and tip of the forefinger. A strand of silk one yard! long is not too much for a needle in a practised hand to carry. Anyone who will acquire the habit of handling a long thread will be repaid by the additional ease and grace the long sweep cultivates.

Arts And Crafts At Leeds 449

"The Magic Globe," for Electric Light. By Frances Darlington.

"Style in Furniture."*

IT is the connoisseur and dilettante who are always kept in view in Jacquemart's standard work on this subject, and it is so with most of our more modern histories of furniture. It is, therefore, with a certain feeling of relief that we find the name of Mr. R. Davis Benn on the title-page of the handsome volume before us; for we recognise it as that of the able editor of The Cabinet Maker and Art Furnisher, organ of the trade, and we know that, at all events, his big subject will be handled in a practical manner. Nor are we disappointed. Devoting himself mainly to English furniture, he carries us along with him from the time of Elizabeth to the "early clays of Jacobean," the "inception of Queen Anne," to Chippendale, Heppelwhite and Sheraton, and so to the close of the eighteenth century. Up to that time, the English styles of furniture, it must be admitted, were, for the most part, but modifications of the contemporary French styles, when, indeed, they were not absolute copies of them. With the decline of the classic "Empire" style of Percier and Fontaine, there being no new French models worthy of our emulation, we drifted into the atrocities of the early Victorian era, and, later - once more imitating our Gallic neighbours - into those of the third Empire. About the half a century or more covering this deplorable period, Mr. Benn

Modern

Modern

British

Furniture

From R. Davis Benn's "Style in Furniture."

(Longmans, Green &. Co.) is mercifully silent. Yet we can but think that reference should have been made to the Eastlake movement, which assuredly was not without significance in its honest, if mistaken, efforts to adapt Gothic forms to domestic uses. At all events, it was the first indication of a desire for better things,

* Style in Furniture. By R. Davis Benn. With illustrations by W. C. Baldock. London: Longmans, Green & Co., 39, Paternoster Row, E.C. (Price 21s. net.) and it should have bridged the chasm between the style of the First Empire and the "New Art" development across the Channel, to which many pages are devoted - principally to illustrate its extravagances; although, in fairness, it must be said that some rational, not to say quite acceptable French, examples under the same discredited

Modern

British

Furniture designation are also shown. In Germany and Austria, this "stringy, interlaced, entangled style of ornament " is called the " Moderne Stil," and in the illustrations given in the book we note with satisfaction the same spirit of absolute fairness which characterises the whole volume. These examples are "good, bad, and different" - as a dear old family servant of the writer used to say.

From R. Davis Benn's "Style in Furniture."

(Longmans, Green & Co.)

Arts And Crafts At Leeds 451