Wood-Carving

The relief should not be very high, and when the form is cut down to the level of the ground, the cuts should be firm and decisive. At the junction of the leaves with the stalks and in the treatment of the corn itself, the cuts should be as clean as possible. Altogether, the carving affords a fine opportunity for cultivating a vigorous stroke with both chisel and gouge.

Metalwork

After the necessary tracing, the work may be mostly clone upon a sandbag. Apart from the large amount of tracing necessary there is nothing difficult in the modelling. Care should be exercised in finishing to give effect to the wavy type of the leal. The sheath should have the highest relief, and graduated to show the folds of the leaves.

The Tudor Rose Frame (No. 100).

Metalwork

The frame could be made either completely from metal or with the rose design cut out and laid on a wood base. In either case, the modelling of the roses and leaves would be the same. The border should be raised, forming an even ridge, inside and outside. In modelling the flowers and leaves, leave the latter flat and raise the tops of the petals with undercutting on the inner edge, to sharpen them up.

Wood-Carving

The hardest part of the work will be the preparation of the frame, and its size suggests that it be carefully made from sound wood by an expert, for if made from one piece it will not be satisfactory. Having the made frame, the actual carving will not be found difficult; the relief is very low, and the amount of work correspondingly small. The rose should, of course, be the highest relief, the leaves being kept low on the ground. To give sharpness, the folds of the petal should be carefully undercut.

Gesso

A plain frame should be prepared for this, with the border worked in the wood, although it may be worked on with compo. The relief should be treated similar to that suggested for the carving.

The Panel (N0. 05). Metalwork. - This is not very difficult, the principal work being in the tracing. Transfer the design carefully on to the polished surface of the copper, then scratch it in, taking care to keep to the carbon lines. After mounting it on the pitch-block, trace the lines, keeping them as even as possible. ? The round seeds may be omitted; next reverse the metal and raise up gradually the seed pod and leaves, taking care to give full effect to the curl of the leaves. When sufficiently raised, reverse again and work from the other side, and, if necessary, turning the metal back again for further raising until finished. The seeds may be put in with ring tools, thus saving a lot of work. In finishing off, the surface of the leaves should be carefully tooled with lines radiating from the stalk, and the edges of both pod and leaves carefully undercut, to give crispness.

Wood-Carving

This will be found a very useful design for the carver; the relief is rather high, but the effect of the leaves and stalk, when carefully carved and well undercut, will be worth the time spent on it. Make the seed-pod the highest relief, graduating to the lower stalk, and, by the use of the gouge in finishing up the leaves, impart a sweep to curves of the leaves.

Gesso

The gesso worker will find some interesting work in this panel. The high relief must be built up with wool and composition carefully mixed together. The curves of the leaves will take some working up. and it may be necessary to carve the work when set, to get the full effect.

Marquetry Panel (No. 108).

To get the best effect, this simple design should be worked up in several colours. The veneers used might be of rare woods as the panel is small. Use one colour for the background, two others for the central panel, and a contrasting pair for the outside. The lines might be omitted or cut in afterwards with a V-shaped tool. The gluing up should be very carefully done to get the whole panel flat. Clean off with a toothing plane and glass paper.