Some excellent suggestions on landscape photography are offered to amateurs by Mr. Edwin S. Bennett, who speaks not only as an amateur photographer of experience and skill, but as also a painter of both figure and landscape subjects. In regard to landscape photography, which is his specialty, he says: "The amateur who devotes himself only to the technical side of his art will never be an artist. It is not enough to secure a sharp impression; indeed, a picture faultless in this respect may be only so much the worse. For, as is the case in paintings, the photograph that shows distinctly every grass-blade and every leaf is very likely to be lacking in effects of mass. What should strike the spectator first is the entire mass of the tree, then the forms of the branches, lastly the individual leaves; and if in a small picture these do not clearly appear, the loss is hardly to be regretted.

"The best time of day tor landscape work is in the early morning or late afternoon. Then the lights and shades are disposed in large masses and few details come out prominently. Before determining on a point of view, look at your subject from all sides, from near and from far. Frequently it happens that with a slight change of position the appearance of the subject is greatly improved. As a rule, it is well to take up your position so that the light may come from one side upon the principal objects in the scene. If the light should fall full in front, the subject may look flat for want of shadow, and if from the back the result may be little more than a silhouette. Avoid subjects in which straigh lines, as of a fence or a railroad track, run across the picture; they will appear to divide it into horizontal sections; but, if necessary for any purpose to take such a view, the effect may be ameliorated by placing a figure so that it will break the monotony of the lines. Bits of foreground, studies of objects close at hand are more likely to give satisfaction than extended views. Let the beginner content himself with photographing picturesque old houses, old mills, rustic bridges, and groups of trees, when the lights and shadows are well defined and well balanced. Effects of atmosphere and light will come later when he knows perfectly the management of camera, developing bath, and printing apparatus."

A Settle, which may be built with great strength while vet owning all the litheness and slenderness shown in our sketch, is provided with a back the upholstery of which is somewhat lower than usual. The deficiency is made up by loose hangings carried all about under a high frame. For a tete-a-tete this seat would be very comfortable, without risk of draught and with much of the seclusion of the old-time high-back settle. For a young lady's sitting-room it would look well covered with some pretty striped and flowered material and with a little painted or gilded decoration. One made in this fashion had its woodwork finished in white enamel, devoid of all ornament. The cushions and curtains were of white soft silk with a gold-colour pattern; the whole effect was cool and dainty.

Design for a Settle.by F. G. S. Bryce. 196

Design for a Settle.by F. G. S. Bryce. 196

Glimpse of the Home like Hall In A Country House

Glimpse of the Home-like Hall In A Country House. With Timbered Ceiling and generous Fire-place.

Awarded Third Prize at the recent Exhibition of Arts and Crafts at Oxford.

Awarded Third Prize at the recent Exhibition of Arts and Crafts at Oxford.